Renault tabs F1 KERS system for electric car concept

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Formula One machines and road cars may look as if they’re worlds apart, but Renault is making an effort to bring those worlds closer together by utilizing the kinetic energy recovery system — or KERS — for its Twizy F1 electric concept car.

A collaboration between RenaultSport’s production car team and RenaultSport’s F1 department (which supplies engines for a number of F1 squads including Red Bull Racing), the Twizy F1 is a lightweight, rear-wheel drive single-seater that, thanks to KERS, has a claimed 0-62 mph acceleration time of 6.0 seconds.

In case you’re new to F1, the KERS system collects the kinetic energy that’s present in the waste heat created by the car under braking and converts it into power that can be used for acceleration. For the Twizy F1, KERS raises the car’s power from 17 horsepower to 97 (although the boost is only available for 14 seconds). After being stored, said energy is activated by a pair of paddles that are on the car’s steering wheel, which is taken directly from the Formula Renault 3.5 racing machines.

The Twizy F1 also boasts a body kit that mimics its Grand Prix brethren, coming complete with front and rear wings, a rear diffuser, and a set of slicks.

“We always said we wanted to create F1-derived technology that was road relevant,” said Jean-Michel Jalinier, RenaultSport F1 president and managing director in a press release. “Hopefully, this car will make a few people smile while also making a serious point…I’m not sure we’ll be seeing many of these cars on our roads, but it does show that the same principles we see on the race track can be filtered down to the road car range – this is just the evil elder brother!”

Renault has attempted to apply F1 technology to a production vehicle before. In 1994, it unleashed the four-passenger Espace F1 concept, which featured a carbon fiber body, six-speed paddle-shift gearbox, and last but not least, an 820-horsepower V10 engine as used in Williams’ 1993 challenger, the FW15C.

The Twizy F1 will make its public debut this weekend at the World Series by Renault event in Aragon, Spain.

Porsche pulls GTLM cars from Mid-Ohio because of COVID-19 positives

Porsche Mid-Ohio COVID-19
David Rosenblum/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images
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Porsche will skip Saturday’s IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship race with its two GTLM cars at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course after three positive COVID-19 tests were confirmed during the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

That resulted in Porsche choosing to pull out of the Nurburgring 24 Hour endurance race in Germany, electing to avoid sending any team members as a precautionary measure.

Porsche Motorsport announced Tuesday that its COVID-19 decision also would apply at Mid-Ohio to its No. 911 and No. 12 teams.

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Three of Porsche’s four IMSA GTLM drivers — Laurens Vanthoor, Frederic Makowiecki and Nick Tandy — also were racing in Le Mans. The trio has remained isolated in Europe and won’t be allowed to travel.

“Based on yesterday’s decision that no employee or racing driver of our Le Mans team will participate in the Nürburgring 24 Hours, we have today decided that this ruling will also apply to the upcoming IWSC race in Mid-Ohio,” Fritz Enzinger, vice president for Porsche Motorsport, said in a release. “This means that Laurens, Nick and Fred will not be traveling to the USA.

“This is very regrettable, but we would like to emphasize that in this case as well the health of all those concerned is the prime focus of the decisions we have taken.”

The decision also affects Earl Bamber, who teamed with Vanthoor to win the GTLM championship last year in the No. 912.

Porsche said its GTLM Porsche 911 RSR-19 entries will return for the Oct. 10 race at the Charlotte Motor Speedway Roval.

That will reduce the GTLM class to four cars — two Corvettes and two BMWs — this weekend at Mid-Ohio, in what could be somewhat of a 2021 preview. Porsche Motorsport announced earlier this year that it will leave IMSA after the 2020 season because of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.