Lotus confident of their chances in Barcelona

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After up-and-down qualifying efforts in the first four races, Lotus came through with better “Q” form on Saturday at Circuit de Catalunya as Kimi Raikkonen and Romain Grosjean — who both hit the podium last time out in Bahrain — placed fourth and sixth respectively on the grid for tomorrow’s Spanish Grand Prix (7:30 a.m. ET, NBC Sports Network/NBC Sports Live Extra).

Naturally, Raikkonen (pictured), who comes to Barcelona 10 points back of championship leader Sebastian Vettel, isn’t letting himself get hyped up about the performance on Saturday. But he wonders if the Mercedes front row of pole sitter Nico Rosberg and Lewis Hamilton will be able to finally turn their one-lap mastery into something more.

If they can’t, the Finn and his other main rivals may be in prime position on Sunday.

“You can’t really say on Saturday what will happen; you just have to make a good start and then see what you can do,” Raikkonen said. “We’ve got two fast Mercedes ahead of us and we’ll have to see how strong they are over a full distance. I’m sure the Ferrari and Red Bull will be competitive, so like any race we’ll just do our best and see where we end up.”

A mistake on his flying lap in Q3 caused Grosjean to originally qualify seventh this morning, but he was elevated to sixth following a grid penalty for Ferrari’s Felipe Massa. Lotus has done well in taking care of their tires this season, and the Frenchman is banking on that to help him get another solid result.

“We saw a lot of degradation during Friday’s [practice] sessions and today, it was a bit warmer, so with the changing conditions tyre management will again be key,” he said. “Our car is quite good in this aspect; it has been well designed and prepared by our engineers to preserve the tires, so we’ll see what happens and hope to find the best possible strategy.”

Watch tomorrow’s Spanish Grand Prix online and on your mobile device.

Morris Nunn, former IndyCar and F1 engineer, team owner dies at 79

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Morris Nunn, a former Formula 1 team owner and a prominent fixture in the American Open Wheel Racing scene through the 1990s and the early 2000s, died at 79 on Wednesday after a long battle with Parkinson’s disease, according to the Indianapolis Star.

Nunn’s career in racing spans both sides of the Atlantic. He started in the 1960s as a driver before shifting his attention toward the mechanical side of the sport. He then founded a Formula 1 effort, dubbed Ensign Racing, which competed in over 100 F1 races between 1973 and 1982 – the team had a best result of fourth.

However, Nunn may be best known in the U.S. for his exploits in American Open Wheel Racing. He crossed the pond after closing the Ensign outfit in 1982, and was a part of the Patrick Racing team that won the 1989 Indianapolis 500 with Emerson Fittipaldi.

He moved to Chip Ganassi Racing in the 1990s, where he perhaps achieved the bulk of his success. He worked with Alex Zanardi as both his crew chief and engineer during Zanardi’s tenure from 1996 to 1998, and the combination saw Zanardi take Rookie of the Year Honors in ’96, followed by a pair of championships in ’97 and ’98 in the old CART series.

31 May 1997: Alex Zanardi (left) of Italy talks to Mo Nunn , engineer for the Target Ganassi Racing Team, at The Milwaukee Mile in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Nunn also won the 1999 championship with then CART rookie Juan Pablo Montoya.

In 2000, he formed his own team, Mo Nunn Racing, with driver Tony Kanaan – Bryan Herta also contested a trio of events for Nunn that year after Kanaan suffered an injury – and the outfit grew to two cars in 2001, with Zanardi competing alongside Kanaan.

Nunn also ventured into the series that is now called the Verizon IndyCar Series in 2002, fielding an entry for Felipe Giaffone. They went on to win one race that year (Kentucky Speedway) and Nunn’s outfit won another in 2003, with Alex Barron at Michigan International Speedway.

Nunn was a popular and highly regarded figure in the paddock, and a number of people in the racing world took to social media to offer condolences and tributes.

IndyCar on NBC’s Robin Miller offered this detailed look at Nunn’s life in the sport on RACER.com, covering the origins of his career and the impact he had on such drivers as Zanardi and Montoya.

Nunn was 79 years of age at the time of his passing.

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