Katherine Legge survives Bump Day bubble at Indy

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With about 20 minutes remaining in Bump Day at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Katherine Legge was strapped into her No. 81 Schmidt Peterson Pelfrey Motorsports Honda, ready to defend her spot on the 33rd starting position for the 97th Indianapolis 500 if necessary.

Turns out she didn’t have to bother. Legge’s four-lap average of 223.176 miles per hour was enough for her to stay in the field as Michel Jourdain, Jr., the only driver that could take her out of it, did not make a bump attempt in the waning moments.

The Mexican racer and his No. 17 Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing team had been searching for solid speed throughout the week, but could never find it. His fastest lap on Sunday was at 219.843 mph — nowhere close to what he’d need to knock Legge off the grid.

As a result, there was no bumping on Bump Day at the Brickyard for the second consecutive year.

“All of the guys tried so hard,” Jourdain said to NBC Sports Network’s Marty Snider. “All week, we struggled a lot. Some days, it felt like it may be feeling a little better but it was never there.

“This morning, we tried  James’ [Jakes] set-up and it was impossible to drive and then we pulled Graham’s [Rahal] setup — the car was exactly the same — and he couldn’t drive it. He said it was impossible to drive. We changed whatever we had time to [change], we went out, and the car was exactly the same…It’s just so sad. My sponsors trust me and it’s not like I can go next week and do another race.”

As for Legge, who was announced as the driver of the No. 81 Honda on Saturday, she had mixed emotions — feeling badly for Jourdain’s plight but happy to be back in the “500.”

“It’s not nice for him to not have the opportunity,” she said to NBCSN’s Will Buxton. “However, I am happy that I am in the field, I’m not gonna lie about that. It’s been a really, really long few days but I’m gonna sleep tonight for the first time really good.”

Also joining her on the last row of the grid will be A.J. Foyt Racing rookie Conor Daly in 31st position (223.582 mph) and 1996 Indy 500 winner Buddy Lazier (223.443) in 32nd position.

“It’s really about the team,” Lazier said to NBCSN’s Robin Miller. “They did a great job. With the small amount of time, a lot of hard work and a lot of heart, they gave us a great race car. We were sweating today. The track temperature was going up and everybody was struggling. But it was a good car. It’s been in the 225 range so we knew it had speed but, boy, I was definitely sweatin’ it the last two hours.”

97TH INDIANAPOLIS 500
STARTING LINEUP

Row 1
20-Ed Carpenter
26-Carlos Munoz
25-Marco Andretti

Row 2
5-E.J. Viso
2-A.J. Allmendinger
12-Will Power

Row 3
1-Ryan Hunter-Reay
3-Helio Castroneves
27-James Hinchcliffe

Row 4
4-J.R. Hildebrand
98-Alex Tagliani
11-Tony Kanaan

Row 5
22-Oriol Servia
19-Justin Wilson
7-Sebastien Bourdais

Row 6
9-Scott Dixon
10-Dario Franchitti
14-Takuma Sato

Row 7
83-Charlie Kimball
16-James Jakes
77-Simon Pagenaud

Row 8
60-Townsend Bell
8-Ryan Briscoe
78-Simona de Silvestro

Row 9
21-Josef Newgarden
15-Graham Rahal
6-Sebastian Saavedra

Row 10
55-Tristan Vautier
18-Ana Beatriz
63-Pippa Mann

Row 11
41-Conor Daly
91-Buddy Lazier
81-Katherine Legge

Reports: Fernando Alonso to test on September 5 at Barber Motorsports Park

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According to a number of media stories Thursday afternoon and evening, two-time Formula One champion Fernando Alonso will reportedly test an Indy car at Barber Motorsports Park on Wednesday, September 5.

The 2.38-mile permanent road course just outside Birmingham, Alabama, per those stories, will play host to Alonso as he reportedly tests with IndyCar’s Andretti Autosport team and Honda.

Honda Performance Development (HPD) President Art St. Cyr issued a statement late Thursday afternoon about Alonso’s reported upcoming test:

“Fernando Alonso is one of the premier racing drivers of this generation, and we very much enjoyed working with him at the 2017 Indianapolis 500.

“He has shown that he can be very competitive right off the bat, and it would be great for IndyCar if he were to decide to drive here full-time after his F1 career. Having Alonso as a driver would be an obvious benefit for any team or manufacturer.”

However, St. Cyr’s statement also included a reference to Honda potentially not being able to field a new engine for Alonso in the IndyCar series in 2019.

“Our engine lease agreements are made between HPD and specific teams,” St. Cyr’s statement said. “Several of our current IndyCar Series teams already have agreements in place with HPD for the 2019 season, and we have been operating near maximum capacity all year long to properly provide powerful, reliable engines for all of our teams.

“We have had discussions with several current and potential teams for 2019, and those discussions are ongoing.”

Rumors of Alonso potentially racing for a hybrid operation that would include Andretti Autosport, McLaren and Harding Racing have been picking up speed. But there’s one potential major hurdle: Harding’s Dallara’s are powered by Chevrolet engines.

Alonso announced earlier this week that he’d be retiring from Formula One at season’s end, saying he’s looking forward to new adventures.

Because of his loyalty to McLaren, it’s increasingly looking as if Alonso comes to IndyCar, McLaren will have some involvement – although perhaps not as much as it potentially could do if it went all-in with a full-time effort immediately in 2019.

There is no word whether Chevrolet or Harding Racing could potentially be on hand at the Sept. 5 test at BMP, even in just an observation role.

Since being part of the winning team at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in June, Alonso’s desire to become only the second driver to win motorsport’s triple crown – the Monaco Grand Prix, Le Mans and the Indianapolis 500 – has increased exponentially.

He’s already won the first two; just a Indy 500 triumph remains on his bucket list.

The late Graham Hill is the only driver to have accomplished the triple crown feat to date.

Alonso, who turned 37 on July 29, has made just one prior IndyCar start, in the 2017 Indianapolis 500. He led 27 laps of the 200-lap event and appeared to have a car strong enough to win before it suffered engine failure with 21 laps remaining.

Instead of what likely could have been a top-five finish, if not a win, Alonso’s first foray into IndyCar racing ended disappointingly with a 24th-place finish.

In addition to being courted by IndyCar, NASCAR has also jumped into the Alonso sweepstakes, saying he’d be welcome to race in the 2019 Daytona 500.

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