2013 Monaco Grand Prix Preview

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The streets of Monte Carlo welcome Formula One for its annual event, attracting the rich and famous from all over the globe for the sport’s jewel in the crown: the Monaco Grand Prix. It is the ultimate test of a driver’s talent behind the wheel and his mental agility, requiring 78 laps of near-perfect precision; anything less sees them finish in the wall, which is never too far away. In Formula One, it doesn’t get much bigger than winning in Monaco.

Monaco Grand Prix Talking Points

Can Mercedes win, finally?

It’s been a talking point since the start of the season, and Mercedes will now be keen to get the monkey off their back. In Spain, overtaking was easy, making Rosberg and Hamilton susceptible to overtakes. Monaco is a different story though, with there being only two real overtaking opportunities on the track. Good tactics and a resolution of their rear tire issues could see the Silver Arrows finally win a grand prix in 2013; their pace in FP1 and FP2 is an encouraging sign that this could be possible.

Just how much of an issue are the Pirelli tires?

Monaco has always been relatively kind on driver’s tires, with a one stop strategy being utilized by most of the field last year. Sergio Perez is confident that he can stop just once on Sunday, and Pirelli have stated that a two-stop will be the optimum strategy for the front runners; a far cry from the four-stop ‘fiasco’ that ensued in Spain. Monaco could see Pirelli regain some credit.

Three and easy for Red Bull in Monaco?

Red Bull Racing has a fine record in Monaco, claiming its first podium there in 2006 and winning the last three races in the principality. As a result, it may surprise many to see them languishing towards the bottom half of the top ten in practice, and the pressure is on for them to return to winning ways this weekend. Luckily, they have the drivers with the most combined Monaco wins of any team on the grid (3), and cannot be written off after practice alone.

Mixed signals from Williams after an odd Thursday

After faring so poorly in the opening five races, you may expect Pastor Maldonado’s P6 finish in FP1 to bring some joy to Williams. However, their response after practice was still somewhat subdued, admitting that the changes made to his car for FP2 (where he finished P14) did not work. Regardless, this race still appears to be the team’s best chance of scoring any points so far this season.

Caterham and Marussia pin their hopes on a crazy race

Monaco has a tendency to produce a crazy race every now and then. In 1996, just three cars finished and Olivier Panis won for Ligier in what is widely considered to be the most surprising race of all time. Therefore, maybe, just maybe, if Caterham and Marussia can keep it on track, they could possible record a strong finish to give either team a stranglehold on P10 in the constructors’ championship. Points may be out of the question, but if it’s going to happen anywhere, it will be at Monaco.

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Track: Circuit de Monaco, Monte Carlo (3.34km)
Laps: 78
Corners: 19
Lap Record: Michael Schumacher 1:14.439 (2004)
Tire Compounds: Super-Soft (Option); Soft (Prime)
2012 Winner: Mark Webber (Red Bull)
2012 Pole Position: Mark Webber 1:14.381
2012 Fastest Lap: Sergio Perez 1:17.296
DRS Zones: Main straight (T19 to T1)

Thursday – Free Practice 1: Session report
Thursday – Free Practice 2: Session report
Saturday – Free Practice 3: 11:00am local/05:00pm ET
Saturday – Qualifying: 14:00pm local/08:00am ET
Sunday – Race: 14:00pm local/08:00am ET

Danica says goodbye: ‘Definitely not a great ending’ but ‘I’m for sure grateful’

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INDIANAPOLIS – Danica Patrick’s final racing news conference didn’t but at least she didn’t lose her sense of humor about it.

“Is that like the Oscars when they close the show out?” Patrick joked when her opening address was drowned out by the midrace broadcast of Sunday’s Indianapolis 500 in the media center. “Take my mic away. I’ll leave. I promise. I don’t really want to be here because I’m pretty sad, but all right. I guess I’ll stop there.”

That was about as lighthearted as it got, though, for the most accomplished female driver in racing history after the final start of her career. That naturally made for some reflection, too.

“I will say that I’m for sure very grateful for everybody,” she said. “It still was a lot of great moments this month. A lot of great moments this year.”

Patrick was the first woman to lead both the Indianapolis 500 (in her 2005 debut) and the Daytona 500 (in 2013 when she also was the first female to qualify on pole position in NACAR history).

But she couldn’t bookend that with similarly memorable finishes. After crashing out of her final two Cup races in the November 2017 season finale at Homestead-Miami Speedway and the 2018 Daytona 500, Indy concluded the same way.

“Definitely not a great ending,” she said. “But I kind of said before I came here that it could be a complete disaster, as in not in the ballpark at all. And look silly, then people may remember that. And if I win, people will remember that.

“Probably anything in between might just be a little part of the big story. So I kind of feel like that’s how it is. I’m appreciative for all the fans, for GoDaddy, for Ed Carpenter Racing, for IndyCar. Today was a tough day. A little bit of it was OK. A lot of it was just a typical drive.”

Beforehand, Patrick seemed relaxed while smiling and laughing outside her car with a tight circle of close friends and family that included her parents and boyfriend Aaron Rodgers, the Green Bay Packers quarterback.

“For sure, I was definitely nervous,” she said about her first Indy 500 start in seven years. “I found myself most of the time on the grid being confused what part of prerace we were in. I was like, ‘I remember this,’ and ‘Where are the Taps?’ and ‘When is the anthem?’ but I had all my people around me, so I was in good spirits.”

And with that, she bid adieu.

“Thank you guys,” she said. “Thank you for everything. I’ll miss you. Most of the time. Maybe you’ll miss me just a little. Thanks, guys.”