A.J. and Larry Foyt have family team at top of IndyCar

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Larry Foyt may be earning praise for his management of the team that bears his father’s name. But he makes sure to keep four-time Indianapolis 500 champion A.J. Foyt 100 percent involved in its direction.

“Believe it or not, I hardly make a decision that we [both] don’t go over,” Larry said on Thursday at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. “Our working relationship has really been awesome. When I first came in, when he made the announcement that I was going to be team director, I didn’t want to just jump in and be the boss’ kid [and] come in and change everything. I really had to get back into an IndyCar mentality. I wanted to analyze the team, see what we were working with.

“As I’ve learned over the years, every year he’s given me a little bit more leeway to do things the way I’ve wanted. I think we’ve become a more engineering-based team, kind of what modern IndyCar racing is. It has changed a lot over the years.”

It was Larry that was the catalyst for the team’s signing of driver Takuma Sato, with A.J. mentioning that his son was “doing most of the talking” on that effort. So far, the decision has paid off handsomely with Sato’s victory at Long Beach last month (the first in over a decade for A.J. Foyt Racing) and a place atop the IZOD IndyCar Series championship standings going into this weekend’s “500.”

“I think we knew he was a good race driver,” A.J. said about Sato’s hire. “He did a lot of testing for Honda way back yonder on road courses. [We were] kind of looking for a guy that could play both parts, ovals and road courses…He does give you good feedback. [He] and the engineers work very close. I think that’s really been successful for us.”

As for the chances that he, Rick Mears and Al Unser are joined by either Helio Castroneves or Dario Franchitti this weekend as four-time winners of the “500,” A.J. said he wouldn’t be surprised to see “a six, seven, eight-time winner” of the race one day with the current technology being used.

However, he also wondered how Castroneves and Franchitti would fare in the equipment he raced with in the past.

“They’re good race car drivers with the equipment they’re in, [but] they need to get in a roadster with cement tires and see how good they stick in a corner,” A.J. said, earning some laughs from his audience.

Make sure to follow all of Friday’s Indy 500 ‘Carb Day’ action on NBCSN from Indianapolis

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It’s known as “Carburetor Day” – or in its simplest term, just “Carb Day.”

But the final day of on-track action Friday at Indianapolis Motor Speedway before Sunday’s 102nd Running of the Indianapolis 500 is so much more.

Especially on NBCSN, which will have wall-to-wall live coverage starting Friday morning.

Here’s how Friday’s schedule breaks down:

  • 11 a.m. ET: Carb Day kicks off with the final practice for Sunday’s Indy 500. The session will last one hour in length.
  • 12 p.m. ET: We’re going racing! Strap in for coverage of the Indy Lights’ Freedom 100 on the famous Brickyard.
  • 1:30 p.m. ET: We’ll have coverage of the annual IndyCar Pit Stop Challenge. Which teams have the best – and most importantly, fastest and accurate – pit crews? Team Penske has won 10 of the last 12, including the last two years edging out Schmidt Peterson Motorsports each time. Who can potentially beat them this year?
  • 3:30 p.m. ET: We’ll have our annual NASCAR America Motorsports Special. Among segments included in the 90-minute show will be:1) 2016 Indy 500 winner Alexander Rossi will discuss how it used to upset him when people suggested he “backed into” his big win and how he didn’t really feel vindicated until he qualified on the front row for last year’s race.
    2) Defending 500 winner Takuma Sato, the first Japanese driver to ever win at Indianapolis, discusses the impact of his big win personally and professionally, particularly back in his native land.
    3) An essay by Robin Miller on Stefan Wilson giving up his ride last year to allow Fernando Alonso to race for Andretti Autosport.
    4) An essay by Nate Ryan on Danica Patrick as she looks to compete in her final Indy 500 before retiring from professional racing.

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