IndyCar officials announce preliminary details of return to innovation

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Set against a backdrop of the historic cars that have graced Indianapolis Motor Speedway for more than a century, at the IMS Museum, IndyCar’s new leaders described the preliminary plan for innovation to return to the series.

The key word here is “preliminary.” Specific details were hard to find in the formal remarks made Thursday by Hulman & Co. CEO Mark Miles, head of IndyCar’s parent company, and IndyCar’s new President of Competition/Operations Derrick Walker, who will take his new post after the month of May concludes.

The official line from the sanctioning body is that IndyCar will open the door to increased technical innovation in its cars and safety, with Walker directly responsible for identifying specific improvements and guiding their implementation.

Miles wants to see big speeds return to the Speedway – pun intended. Arie Luyendyk has the four-lap track record (236.986 mph),  the single-lap record (237.498 mph) and unofficial practice lap record (239.260) at IMS, all set in 1996 with a previous-year Reynard-Ford Cosworth IndyCar.

“We want to step up our game,” Miles said. “We’ve achieved a great car platform, so now we can move forward to explore what’s next.”

Ways to do so, at least with the current Dallara DW12 chassis and the 2.2L V6 turbocharged engines from Honda and Chevrolet, include the long-discussed but not-yet-finalized introduction of aero kits, and the plea from drivers, teams and fans alike for – as “Top Gear’s” Jeremy Clarkson might say – more power.

Walker said aero kits are more likely to see the light of day first, before manufacturers agree to a horsepower increase.

“The first bit will likely be aero kits,” said Walker. “There is room for the cars to advance aerodynamically.”

There’s a fine line to ensure innovation returns and the solid nature of the current IndyCar on-track product isn’t affected as a result, Walker said.

“There is plenty of speed in this car if we want to let it go, and if we can manage it,” he said. “To get where we want to go, it will take time. It will take a very careful structuring.”

In March, IndyCar announced the formation of an 11-member advisory Competition Committee. Members on it include Walker, officials from Dallara, HPD, Chevrolet and Firestone, other IndyCar senior officials and two drivers (Ryan Hunter-Reay and Dario Franchitti) and two team representatives (Tim Cindric, Penske and Bryan Herta).

Indianapolis Motor Speedway unveils logo for 2019 Indy 500

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The 102nd Running of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway officials are already thinking about next year’s Indy 500.

Speedway officials on Friday unveiled the logo for the 103rd running of the 500 next year, which will be held on Sunday, May 26, 2019.

According to a Speedway media release, “The logo for the 103rd Indianapolis 500 includes bold, dynamic features that will form the core of future logos for ‘The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.’”

 

In addition, the new logo, according to the release, “is athletic, prestigious and confident and includes a rich navy blue that contrasts with gold, the color of the iconic Wing and Wheel logo of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

“A row of red bricks race upward and forward, referencing the bricks that formed the track’s surface for decades and remain present today in the famous Yard of Bricks at the start-finish line.”

The logo will serve as part of a new branding system that will feature it as part of future logo designs, as well.

“This new logo system is an exciting step forward for the identity of the Indianapolis 500,” IMS President J. Douglas Boles said. “The 103rd Indianapolis 500 logo, created within this system, salutes the traditions and legacy of the race while looking ahead to its bright future.”

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