Helio, Dario go for history at the Indy 500

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When it comes to their thoughts on becoming a four-time winner of the Indianapolis 500, Helio Castroneves (pictured, right) and Dario Franchitti (pictured, left) couldn’t be more different.

Castroneves, the gregarious Brazilian that has become famous at Indy for his joyous fence-climbing victory celebrations, is clearly humbled by his accomplishments at the Brickyard. That said, his humility isn’t completely overpowering. In fact, he approaches the subject of a potential fourth victory in the “500” with what appears to be a mix of anticipation and awe.

And he certainly appreciates his little race with Franchitti to join the four-time winners’ club, one of the bigger storylines going into Sunday’s race.

“I like [the pressure],” he said on Thursday. “I believe it pushes me and it pushes everyone [on the team]. It’s [Franchitti’s] first time and our third or fourth time to be in this position [to win a fourth Indy 500] and I think having competition makes you better.

“I feel that not only myself but the entire Penske team wants to bring it home before they bring it home.”

As for Franchitti, the laid-back Scotsman who has primarily made his mark on Indianapolis in more recent years, he has always been reluctant to discuss where he thinks his place in history may be. When one takes into account his three “500” wins and his four IZOD IndyCar Series championships, one assumes that Franchitti’s place is rather high up already.

But he’s still wary to put himself alongside his heroes of Indy: Drivers such as four-time winners A.J. Foyt, Rick Mears and Al Unser, as well as others like his fellow Scot Jim Clark and Dan Gurney.

“It’s always weird to get involved,” said Franchitti. “There’s something not quite right about feeling in the conversation. I view them on the pedestal.”

Still, while he isn’t as effusive as Castroneves on talking about his achievements at Indy, he is still thankful for the the opportunity he gets every May to be in one of the world’s most iconic sporting events.

“I’ve said it before, but the more you do it, the more you appreciate it,” Franchitti said. “First year [at Indy], I was like, ‘What’s the big deal?’ Then I finished the race and I was like ‘Yeah, I get it.’ [The feeling has] increased year by year.”

Castroneves and Franchitti have had relatively quiet months of May (the former starts 8th on Sunday, while the latter goes from 17th), but all of that is about to change as the spotlight heads squarely towards them. History at Indianapolis is on the line and everyone, from the diehards to the casual onlookers, will be keeping an eye on their progress on Sunday.

This year’s race marks the first since 1987 that will see two three-time winners attempt to join Foyt, Mears and Unser in one of racing’s most exclusive clubs. Castroneves and Franchitti may have different viewpoints on what it would mean to ascend to that legendary status, but both men will give everything they have to get there.

AJ Foyt Racing promotes Benjamin Pedersen from Indy Lights to IndyCar for 2023 season

Benjamin Pedersen AJ Foyt
AJ Foyt Racing
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Benjamin Pedersen is the first driver to land a promotion from Indy Lights into IndyCar for next season as AJ Foyt Racing confirmed Wednesday he’ll be part of its 2023 lineup.

Pedersen, a 23-year-old dual citizen of Denmark and the United States, spent last season running the full Indy Lights schedule for HMD Motorsports. Linus Lundqvist, his teammate, won the Lights title, and Pedersen finished fifth in the final standings. Pedersen earned his only win earlier this month when he led every lap from the pole at Portland.

Pedersen also ran four races for HMD in 2021 with back-to-back runner-up finishes in his debut. Pedersen landed on AJ Foyt Racing team president Larry Foyt’s radar through a “trusted colleague” and Pedersen spent most of last season shadowing the IndyCar team.

His promotion to IndyCar comes ahead of all four drivers who finished ahead of him in the Indy Lights standings, including champion Lundqvist.

“We are really looking forward to having Benjamin as part of the team,” Larry Foyt said. “His enthusiasm is infectious, and he is 100 percent committed to IndyCar, AJ Foyt Racing, and doing the best he can to win races.

“It’s been great to have him embedded with the team this past season, and everyone is excited to hit the ground running when testing begins. It is also great to have a multi-year program in place, which will help him and the team grow together.”

Foyt did not announce a car number for Pedersen. Kyle Kirkwood spent his rookie season driving AJ Foyt’s flagship No. 14 but Kirkwood is moving to Andretti Autosport. The team has not yet announced if Dalton Kellett will return for a fourth season, and a third car for Tatiana Calderon was pulled from competition after seven races because of sponsorship non-payment. Shutting down Calderon’s team removed the only semi-regular female driver from the IndyCar field.

Pedersen, however, was signed to an agreement Foyt said “spans multiple seasons as the team plans to develop the young rookie and is aligned to a longer-term plan for AJ Foyt Racing.”

Pedersen was born in Copenhagen but raised in Seattle and currently lives in Indianapolis. He said his time shadowing the IndyCar team has given him a jump on his rookie preparations.

“I’ve spent a lot of time this season with AJ Foyt Racing learning the ins and outs of making the jump to IndyCar and it’s been really nice to do that in conjunction with my Indy Lights season,” Pedersen said. “IndyCar has been my target goal since I started open wheel racing in 2016. The racing, atmosphere, fans, events, tracks, etc. are all awesome.”