The 2013 Indy 500 was truly historic in more ways than one

2 Comments

Several years ago, Firestone put together an Indianapolis 500 ad (above) that asked the question about Indy, “How do I love you? Let me count the ways.”

It may sound like hyperbole, but it’s hard to find anything not to love about this Sunday’s 97th running of the Indianapolis 500. Sure, a green flag finish could have helped, but tradition has always dictated the race stays just 500 miles, and does not implement a NASCAR-style “Green-White-Checkered” outcome.

Consider, from that standpoint, that the last two years the race has ended under yellow only because of a last lap accident (JR Hildebrand in 2011, Takuma Sato in 2012) marked by a driver either going for the win or trying to hold off pressure from behind. The 2010 race marked the last time an Indianapolis 500 ended with more than one lap under yellow, after Mike Conway’s savage accident.

From the view of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway pressroom, let me count the number of historical notes and/or records set on Sunday:

  • Tony Kanaan’s first ‘500 win in his 12th start ties Sam Hanks (1957) for the latest first-time win in race history, and was his ninth 500-mile race he led before winning.
  • Kanaan set a new record for the fastest ‘500 in history: an average speed of 187.433 mph beat Arie Luyendyk’s old record of 185.981, set in 1990.
  • Kanaan was the first driver to win the ‘500 with the number 11, and the first driver to deliver a win for KV Racing Technology under IndyCar sanction (its last win came in the Champ Car finale in 2008 at Long Beach).
  • Kanaan led this race 15 different times, as did Marco Andretti. That marks the most times any driver has led in both a winning and non-winning effort.
  • Scott Dixon extended his own record of consecutive Indianapolis 500 laps completed to 1,566, while completing the full 500 miles for a sixth straight year (ties Wilbur Shaw, Rodger Ward).
  • There were a record 14 leaders (old record 12 in 1993) for a record 68 lead changes (old record 34 in 2012).
  • Six drivers: Ryan Hunter-Reay, James Jakes, E.J. Viso, Carlos Munoz, AJ Allmendinger and Townsend Bell, all led the ‘500 for the first time.
  • The ‘500 tied the record for number of finishers (26, same as the first in 1911) in a full race distance, and tied the record for number of lead lap finishers (19 in 2009).

Lewis Hamilton receives Daytona 500 invitation from Bubba Wallace

Lewis Hamilton Bubba Wallace
Rudy Carezzevoli/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Lewis Hamilton is a fan of the new NASCAR Cup Series team formed by Denny Hamlin and Michael Jordan to field a car for Bubba Wallace.

Will the six-time Formula One champion also be a fan in person at a NASCAR race in the near future?

Wallace is hoping so.

After Hamilton tweeted his support Tuesday morning about the news of a Hamlin-Jordan-Wallace team making its debut with the 2021 season, Wallace responded with a sly invitation to the Daytona 500.

Much would need to be worked out, starting with how much garage and grandstand access would be afforded for a 2021 season opener that likely would occur during a still ongoing novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

But it would seem fitting given that Hamilton and Wallace have been two of the world’s most outspoken Black athletes about the quest for diversity and racial justice. Hamilton recently reaffirmed his commitment to activism after his donning a Breonna Taylor shirt sparked an FIA inquiry.

The idea of Hamilton attending the season opener already had legs, too. The Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 driver has expressed a desire to race the Daytona 500 after he has retired from Formula One.

He was a spectator (with racing legend Mario Andretti) at four-time champion Jeff Gordon’s final Cup race as a full-time in the 2015 season finale at Homestead-Miami Speedway. In 2011, Hamilton swapped cars with three-time champion Tony Stewart at Watkins Glen International.

Having rubbed shoulders with other racing greats so often, it only would be fitting if Hamilton — who is one victory from tying Michael Schumacher’s career record and also could tie the F1 record with a seventh championship this season — spent some time with the greatest basketball player of all time.

Jeff Gordon was flanked by Mario Andretti and Lewis Hamilton before the 2015 Cup season finale at Homestead-Miami Speedway (Jared C. Tilton/NASCAR via Getty Images).