Forget driving or flying to Sonoma NASCAR race: take the train

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You’ve heard of the Chattanooga Choo-Choo, the Orange Blossom Special and the Wabash Cannonball.

Now you can add the NASCAR Express to the list, as fans attending this weekend’s NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Toyota/SaveMart 350 race and activities at Sonoma Raceway will have a rather unique way to say they’ve arrived — at the racetrack, that is.

Instead of flying or driving to the race, for the first time fans can hop aboard an actual train that will take them literally right to the main entrance.

How cool is that?

The train will depart on race morning from Sacramento with additional stops in Davis and Suisun City before ending up right in front of the track.

“We couldn’t be more excited to finally offer fans this unique and hassle-free enhancement to their race-day experience,” Steve Page, president and general manager of Sonoma Raceway, said in a statement.  “We have worked for nearly two decades to make this happen and we are very grateful for the support and cooperation of all the agencies who’ve come together to make it happen.”

One of the biggest complaints by race fans over the years has been the ingress and egress to the track, with essentially only two main roads into and out of the track. The train option gives an added — and likely much easier and nerve-settling — way to get to and away from the track. If the experiment works out, perhaps we may soon see trains from other venues, including San Francisco (we can only hope, right?).

One other lure: there’s two cars on the train that offer food and drinks!

But this isn’t a $10 roundtrip, unfortunately. The cost is somewhat steep at $199, but there are perks in addition to your roundtrip train fare, including a reserved-seat ticket in the main grandstand, VIP entry to the track, on-track access to driver introductions and pre-race ceremonies (worth much of the price right there) and a commemorative T-shirt.

For more information, call 1-800-870-RACE (7223) or click here.

F1: Max Verstappen provides late-lap thrills at U.S. Grand Prix

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AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Leave it to Red Bull’s Max Verstappen to provide some late-race thrills at the U.S. Grand Prix.

Verstappen’s key block on Mercedes driver Lewis Hamilton late in Sunday’s race denied Hamilton a chance to maybe chase down Ferrari’s Kimi Raikkonen to win. And it helped deny Hamilton’s bid for the season championship.

Verstappen’s defensive skills allowed the Red Bull driver to finish second, his best result yet at the U.S Grand Prix, his fourth podium in six races. By keeping Hamilton third, it kept the season championship alive, even if just another week to the Mexican Grand Prix.

Last season, Verstappen had surged past Raikkonen on a final-lap pass to finish third. It was the kind of aggressive move that earned him the “Mad Max” nickname. Before he could even reach the podium, race officials declared Verstappen’s move illegal and bumped an angry Verstappen down to fifth.

The Circuit of the Americas this week installed a new curb on the same corner, dubbed “Verstoppen,” to punish drivers who tried anything similar this year. It worked when Verstappen hit it hard enough in qualifying to knock his car out of the session with a damaged suspension and gear box. He started Sunday’s race 18th.

The Dutch driver launched a furious attack through the field and found himself in the thick of things late Sunday. His move to block Hamilton wasn’t on the same corner with the curbs, and it came with him playing defense instead of being the aggressor.

Verstappen had to make multiple moves to keep Hamilton behind him and finally drove the Mercedes wide, forcing Hamilton to finally concede the position and the race.

“I was trying to get close to Kimi but at the same time keeping an eye on Lewis in my mirror. It was close, but we managed to hang on,” Verstappen said. “It is safe to say today went a lot better than expected.”

Knowing Verstappen’s aggressive nature, Hamilton said there was too much at stake to risk a collision.

“The key to me was to make sure I finished ahead of Seb. I don’t care when you win a championship, just that you win,” Hamilton said. “”For Max, to come back from so far, he did a great job.”

Verstappen has been just as aggressive at the Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez in Mexico City.

In 2016, race officials ruled he improperly left the track to gain an advantage on Vettel to finish third and he was bumped from the podium. Last season, Verstappen’s strong start sent him into the lead out of the first turn, while Hamilton and Vettel bumped each other. The collision ruptured one of Hamilton’s tires.

Verstappen won the race while Hamilton limped home in ninth place, but still won the season championship.