Pair of former IndyCar drivers score Le Mans class wins

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Three drivers with former IndyCar ties won their classes at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, and one current part-timer also secured a class podium.

Bertrand Baguette and Martin Plowman, who each drove part-time in IndyCar in 2011 with Baguette full-time a year earlier, shared the winning No. 35 OAK Racing Morgan Nissan (sister No. 24 car, which finished second, pictured) in the LMP2 class with Ricardo Gonzalez.

Baguette, who nearly stole the 2011 Indianapolis 500 for Bobby Rahal’s team on fuel mileage, had to take evasive action when another LMP2 Oreca Nissan spun in front of him with just over one hour remaining. He avoided the other car and the Armco barriers to bring the car home to the finish.

“I’m delighted to win here because this is only the second time I have taken part in the 24 Hours of Le Mans,” said the Belgian, who paid tribute to his countryman Jacky Ickx, a six-time Le Mans winner. “I hope I can follow in his footsteps and that this win was just the start.”

Plowman struggled for available track time in the week leading up to his first Le Mans start, as red flags seemed to frequently occur prior to his stint in practice and qualifying. But the Englishman drove an excellent race and was rarely outside the top three positions in the 22-car class.

“Winning Le Mans is a dream for young drivers, so this is obviously the highlight of my career to date,” he said. “Our thoughts also go out to the family of Allan Simonsen, because even though I didn’t know him personally, we have all lost a brother today.”

Jean-Karl Vernay, who raced Plowman in the 2010 Firestone Indy Lights Series and secured that year’s championship, was part of the winning lineup in the GTE Am class in the No. 76 Imsa Performance Matmut Porsche 911 GT3 RSR.

Mike Conway, Detroit race one winner in IndyCar this year, joined Plowman on the LMP2 class podium. The Englishman co-drove the G-Drive Racing No. 26 Oreca 03 Nissan with John Martin and Roman Rusinov to a third-place finish in his Le Mans debut.

“We had the pace to win,” Conway told RACER.com. “We had two light panel issues and lost 15 minutes in the pits total getting it fixed. That ended up costing us a couple of laps…the fight back was good, but now we need to come back and win.”

Various mechanical failures blighted the charge of Ryan Briscoe in the Level 5 Motorsports’ HPD ARX-03b. The jet-setting Australian now heads back to the U.S. to test Panther Racing’s IndyCar Tuesday in Pocono.

Josef Newgarden dominates from pole to win KOHLER Grand Prix at Road America

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There’s a reason why Josef Newgarden calls Road America his favorite racetrack – and he showed why Sunday, dominating to victory in the KOHLER Grand Prix at Road America in Elkhart Lake, Wisc.

Newgarden led all but two laps from the pole and was in a class of his own throughout the 55-lap caution-free race on the 4.048-mile, 14-turn road course in central Wisconsin, defeating runner-up Ryan Hunter-Reay by 3.3759 seconds.

“(I wanted this one) really bad,” Newgarden told NBCSN in victory lane. “I wanted to win here since last year. This car has been a rocket all weekend. It wasn’t easy. Ryan was very quick and I knew Dixon was right behind him, so we were working for it the entire race.

“I kind of knew what I had to do, but it was a lot of work. Ryan was really pushing me. It’s good to get a win. It doesn’t matter what car, as long as it’s Team Penske.”

It was Newgarden’s series-leading third win of the season in the first 10 races (also won at ISM Raceway in Phoenix and Barber Motorsports Park in Birmingham, Alabama), pushing him past Team Penske teammate and Indy 500 winner Will Power and Scott Dixon, who both have two wins in the 2018 campaign.

“I was hoping to make it more interesting for the fans here at Road American and on TV,” Hunter-Reay said. “The last two stints, when he put on used red and I had blacks, he was really hooked up. … I was pushing 110 percent, that’s for sure.

“Unfortunately, I just couldn’t catch up to Josef. I was able to close up the gap a little bit here and there, but not like I was early in the race. He found his own way for sure. Definitely, the clean air out front helps, but hats off to him: he had a great race and deserves the win.”

Dixon finished third, followed by Takuma Sato, Robert Wickens, Graham Rahal, Simon Pagenaud, Spencer Pigot (his best finish of the season), Ed Jones and James Hinchcliffe.

Dixon (393 points) maintains the Verizon IndyCar Series points lead, Hunter-Reay (348) moved up two spots to second place, Alexander Rossi (tied with Hunter-Reay for second at 348) dropped one spot to third, Newgarden (343) climbed one spot to fourth and Will Power (328) dropped two spots to fifth in the standings.

“It’s so tight … so tough,” Dixon said. “The Verizon IndyCar Series, right now, the competition is through the roof. To get a podium these days is tough enough, yet to get a win. But we’ll keep pushing and see what we get.”

There was action right from the opening lap, including misfortune for Indianapolis 500 winner Will Power, who suffered engine issues that sent him to the pits after the opening lap.

After trying to work on his car in the pits, Power’s team pushed it back to the paddock to attempt further repairs, but those efforts failed and the car was retired.

Power was third in the IndyCar points standings coming into the race, 36 points behind series leader Scott Dixon. He finished last (23rd) in Sunday’s race and will likely drop to fifth in the standings.

“They replaced the exhaust, and it just blew straight back out,” Power told NBCSN’s Marty Snider. “So, there’s obviously something going on in there that’s gone wrong.

“I feel bad for all the guys. It’s just one of those things, you know – you’ll get that every now and then at some point. No good, but we’ll move on to the next one.”

Also, 2016 Indy 500 winner Alexander Rossi had an issue with what appeared to be brakes- or suspension-related that resulted in a lengthy pit stop after 38 laps. Rossi finished 16th in the 23-car field.

“Hugely disappointing,” Rossi told NBCSN. “It was good enough for fourth … but I guess it just wasn’t meant to be.”

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