New F1 engines ‘approaching aerospace technology’ – Renault

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Renault were at the forefront of F1’s last turbo era, leading the way by introducing a 1.5-litre turbocharged engine in 1977 at a time when all the other teams were using normally-aspirated power units.

Within a few years F1 had tapped the enormous power of turbocharged engines and Renault won a string of races, although they failed to clinch a championship.

Turbo power was outlawed at the end of 1988 but will return to F1 next year. Renault’s director of testing and development Jean-Pierre Menrath, who worked on the original Renault turbos of 1977, explained how the technology has moved on since then:

“The major difference, of course, and the major technological development on the new engine, is in the electronics,” he said. “We started developing a turbocharged engine with distributors and igniters, which are no longer in use today. The fuel injection system had no electronics.”

“And in terms of design, the modern simulation tools didn’t exist back then, nor did all the computer systems and software used to design the engines more effectively and track their performance more accurately.

“There was no telemetry, no data acquisition. For the record, the driver could alter the booster pressure. Our “telltale” was a dial with a needle that was stuck pointing up. So, at the end of the day, the level of monitoring was somewhat limited.

“Nowadays, engine technology is a lot more effective. We’re very close to the complex systems used in aerospace.”

Towards the end of the development of the old turbo engines Renault saw some astronomical power outputs: “We went from 520/530bhp in 1979 to over 1,000bhp in the space of five years!”

“At the end of 1986, we even had a test engine that was capable of developing up to 1,200bhp thanks to the use of new turbochargers, with a new design. At the outset, they were intended to be used at altitude and in the end, at sea level, they produced exceptional performances. Unfortunately, the engine only lasted three laps!”

Renault anticipate next year’s engine, dubbed F1 Energy, will produce around 600bhp with a further 160bhp coming from the electrical energy recovery systems.

Steve Torrence takes NHRA points lead with Gatornationals victory

NHRA Gainesville Steve Torrence
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GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Two-time defending NHRA Top Fuel champion Steve Torrence took the points lead Sunday in the AMALIE Motor Oil Gatornationals, beating his father, Billy, in the final round at Gainesville Raceway.

Torrence had a 3.809-second run at 322.11 mph to win for the third time this year and 39th overall. He is now on track for another championship despite missing the season opener.

“We’ve got some good momentum and to be in the points lead, it’s a testament to how hard these guys work,” Steve Torrence said after the NHRA Gainesville victory. “We’ve just got to stay focused and concentrate on what the task at hand is, and that’s trying to win a championship. These guys give me an unbelievable race car and you just try not to screw it up.”

Ron Capps won in Funny Car, Alex Laughlin in Pro Stock and Matt Smith in Pro Stock Motorcycle.

Capps raced to his second win this year and 66th overall, beating Tim Wilkerson with a 3.937 at 323.12 in a Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat.

Laughlin topped Aaron Stanfield with a 7.068 at 204.76 in a Chevrolet Camaro for his first win this season and fourth in his career. Smith rode to his first victory in 2020 and 25th overall, topping Andrew Hines with a 6.843 at 196.99 on an EBR.