MotorSportsTalk’s predictions: German GP

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The Nurburgring is nicknamed the ‘green hell’ as it pushes the drivers to the limit on top of the Eifel mountains, and it has become a firm fixture on the F1 calendar as it alternates hosting the German Grand Prix with Hockenheim. Having last hosted the race in 2011, there isn’t much of a form guide for the race, making the MST picks all the more difficult for this weekend…

Tony DiZinno (@tonydizinno)

Race winner: Mark Webber. Webber’s on good form at the moment and at a track where he scored his first Grand Prix win in 2009, he follows up his British GP podium comments and wins on his teammate’s home turf.

Surprising finish: Adrian Sutil. Of the Germans in the field, the Force India is the car that could punch above its proverbial weight and grab a result, and Sutil seems the guy to do it if he’s on the right tire strategy.

Most to prove: Romain Grosjean. Four straight races without scoring points; he needs a result, desperately.

Christopher Estrada (@estradawriting)

Race winner: Lewis Hamilton. Both he and Mercedes teammate Nico Rosberg should have an advantage with the Kevlar-belted tires at the Nurburgring, but it’s time for Hamilton to get on the board in 2013.

Surprising finish: Adrian Sutil. I keep waiting for Force India to get on the podium, and they’ve been very close this year. You have to think support from the home crowd can help Sutil, who has shown solid race pace during the season.

Most to prove: Felipe Massa. Four crashes in the last three weeks is tough on anybody, but even more so for Massa, who could be causing Maranello to lose patience with him. However, he just needs to worry about his own confidence and getting that righted with a solid result.

Luke Smith (@LukeSmithF1)

Race winner: Sebastian Vettel. Never won a race in July and never won his home GP – that ends here. Seb could pounce as the slightly softer compounds brought to the race by Pirelli play against Mercedes, giving him a slightly belated 26th birthday present.

Surprising finish: Felipe Massa. Massa has shown good pace at the Nurburgring before, coming 2nd in 2007 and scoring a podium in the final race before his accident in 2009. Ahead of the tire blowout, he was running 3rd at Silverstone, so the Brazilian driver could be onto something this weekend.

Most to prove: Fernando Alonso. Essentially, he has to prove whether or not Ferrari can still win the world championship. There is no denying his great ability to pull a dog of a car through the field, but Mercedes and Red Bull just look too quick right now.

Keith Collantine (@keithcollantine)

Race winner: Nico Rosberg. Whether by fair means or foul Mercedes are definitely getting into the swing of things at the moment. I reckon the more conservative tyres we’re going to see in the next few races will swing the pendulum further towards them.

Surprising finish: Paul di Resta. Will finally get through Saturday without some misfortune confining him to the back rows.

Most to prove: Felipe Massa. At the beginning of the season he seemed to be back at his best but he’s been a temperamental performer since then. Think of the pillorying a rookie driver would get if they crashed as many times as he has in the last three weekends.

Column: Contrasting Michael Schumacher’s and Robert Wickens’ situations

(Photo: Tony Gentile / Reuters)
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As much of the world looks forward to Christmas and New Years Day in the next few weeks, a dark anniversary is also on the near horizon.

It’s hard to believe that December 29 will mark five years since seven-time Formula One champion Michael Schumacher was critically injured in a skiing accident, suffering a traumatic brain injury.

Schumacher and his family were on holiday in the French Alps when he fell and struck his head on a boulder. The impact was so severe that it cracked the helmet he was wearing straight through.

One can only imagine the damage the impact did to Schumacher’s skull and brain.

While chronologically the accident occurred a half-decade ago, for many of “Schu’s” most ardent fans, it seems like it was just yesterday when the earth-shattering news broke.

In the following days and weeks after his accident, Schumacher was placed in a medically induced coma, as well as had at least two surgeries on his brain.

Since then the world has waited for news about the racing legend’s condition, only to receive very little in terms of updates over the subsequent five years.

That’s the way his family wants it, having repeatedly requested privacy when it comes to details about Michael’s condition. That request for privacy should be respected.

Schumacher’s wife, Corrina, issued a rare statement late last month that didn’t really say much about her husband’s condition or recovery, but she did thank fans and well-wishers for their continued prayers and concern about her husband, adding, “We all know Michael is a fighter and will not give up.”

In the meantime, Schumacher’s fans have been able to stay somewhat close to his legacy by watching as his 19-year-old son, Mick, has showed significant achievement in his own budding racing career.

So much so that rumors have already popped up that the younger Schu may soon follow in his father’s F1 footsteps, perhaps as early as 2020.

That, of course, remains to be seen.

What makes the Schumacher situation so difficult for many to still understand is how, while enjoying a simple skiing excursion with his family, he suffered a life-changing accident while having survived some wicked crashes during his racing career that barely affected him.

We still don’t know if Schumacher can walk, talk, is conscious and lucid or not – and many of his fans have already accepted that we may never, ever know any of those details. But if that’s the way he and/or his family want it, again, then we need to respect their wishes.

At the same time, there’s another race car driver who suffered a horrendous injury at Pocono Raceway this past August, namely IndyCar driver Robert Wickens.

Wickens suffered a devastating spinal cord injury that has left him a paraplegic – although there remains a great deal of hope that he will one day walk again.

While both suffered serious injuries, there’s a significant contrast between Schumacher and Wickens. The former (or his family) is keeping all details about his condition private, while the latter keeps his fans and supporters regularly updated on social media on how he’s doing.

That includes Wickens posting a number of videos, including some rather humorous ones where he has a mischievous look in his eyes or a good-natured smirk on his face — like bringing in a Christmas tree to his rehab facility, or “racing” teammate James Hinchcliffe in wheelchairs in a Days of Thunder homage of sorts.

Watching each new Wickens video or reading his most recent online messages, it’s very clear that expressing himself and reaching out to the world is indeed good therapy and medicine of sorts for the Canadian driver.

He needs those social media posts and videos as much as we need them from him.

And it also helps fans better understand where Wickens is at in his recovery and rehab.

If Schumacher or his family wish to still remain private about his condition, we must respect that. But perhaps they could see the good will and good tidings that Wickens’ videos and posts offer. They’re as good for Wickens’ own well-being as they are for his fans — and they could be equally as good for Schumacher, his family and his fans.

Follow @JerryBonkowski