Dirt, NASCAR, Eldora are big winners after Mudsummer Classic

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Occasionally, you just need to tip your cap to someone on a job well done.

In this case, a tip of the cap to two parties: NASCAR, for taking a chance on a dirt track race for the first time in 40 years, and to Eldora Speedway, its track president Roger Slack and track owner Tony Stewart.

It looked weird at first glance – the sight of these lumbering, overpowered and under-tired NASCAR Camping World Trucks attempting to “slide job” and ride loose around the top groove of the half-mile oval in Rossburg, Ohio.

But after just a few minutes and few laps, it looked massive, and it looked like a spectacle.

From the sold-out crowd, to the heat race format, to Norm Benning making the feature race after holding on in his last-chance qualifier, to the four-wide tribute start and salute to the fans, to the race itself. It looked like authentic racing without appearing contrived. It wasn’t a crash fest; it was fairly clean. It was three hours of racing action, but it was never three hours of tedium.

In fact, the only disappointment was that it seemed every time the leaders were approaching traffic, a caution flew for debris. Now in all cases, the big pieces of debris were shown, so you can put the “phantom debris caution” theory to rest on this occasion.

Kyle Larson drove the wheels off his truck but race winner Austin Dillon came through the field just as much, in fact more so than the widely accepted wunderkind who has been hailed by many as NASCAR’s next big thing.

The immediate cries on social media and in some reports was for “MORE DIRT RACING!” or something along those lines.

The challenge for NASCAR, and perhaps for other domestic forms of motorsport, is not to lose the unique nature of this first, one-off dirt track NASCAR experience.

Some of racing’s most iconic races are that way because they’re sparse. Because they’re unique. Monaco, Indianapolis and Le Mans are iconic; Kansas, Kentucky and Chicagoland are not.

Over-saturation of a certain kind of racing – the preponderance of 400-mile snooze fests on 1.5-mile ovals as an example – pretty much reduces those races to also-ran, can-miss status because there’s no differentiating one from another.

NASCAR’s most exciting races have tended to occur on slower tracks visited infrequently. Bristol and Martinsville, the two half-mile tracks, are among the most fun to watch, as are the two road course races at Sonoma and Watkins Glen. Eldora fits this bill to a T.

For NASCAR, perhaps one or two more dirt track races in a year could go a long way toward building up enough sustained season-long interest in dirt, but not overdoing it.

The easiest way to get “MORE DIRT RACING” from here is to simply visit your local short track and see the action there. They need the support.

But as for last night, it was an excellent dirt-digging, groundbreaking ceremony for a form of racing that seeks to make a resurgence in the minds and wallets of race fans.

Here’s a few extra takes on the race from AP/Dan Gelston, USA Today’s Jeff Gluck and Sporting News’ Bob Pockrass.

And here are tweets from Denny Hamlin and Jimmie Johnson.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway unveils logo for 2019 Indy 500

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The 102nd Running of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway officials are already thinking about next year’s Indy 500.

Speedway officials on Friday unveiled the logo for the 103rd running of the 500 next year, which will be held on Sunday, May 26, 2019.

According to a Speedway media release, “The logo for the 103rd Indianapolis 500 includes bold, dynamic features that will form the core of future logos for ‘The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.’”

 

In addition, the new logo, according to the release, “is athletic, prestigious and confident and includes a rich navy blue that contrasts with gold, the color of the iconic Wing and Wheel logo of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

“A row of red bricks race upward and forward, referencing the bricks that formed the track’s surface for decades and remain present today in the famous Yard of Bricks at the start-finish line.”

The logo will serve as part of a new branding system that will feature it as part of future logo designs, as well.

“This new logo system is an exciting step forward for the identity of the Indianapolis 500,” IMS President J. Douglas Boles said. “The 103rd Indianapolis 500 logo, created within this system, salutes the traditions and legacy of the race while looking ahead to its bright future.”

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