Schedule gaps a necessary evil in F1, IndyCar seasons

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It’s a Wednesday afternoon, and we’re smack dab in the middle of two several-week long breaks in the Formula One and IndyCar calendars.

It feels like there’s been longer periods of inactivity this year because, well, there have been. F1 is in the midst of its annual August summer break, four weeks from Hungary on July 28 to Belgium on August 25. But there have been three-week gaps four times already: from Malaysia (March 24) to China (April 14), Bahrain (April 21) to Spain (May 12), Canada (June 9) to Britain (June 30) and Germany (July 7) to Hungary (July 28). But for the remaining nine Grands Prix of 2013, there are no gaps of that length, and the last six F1 races of the year are three sets of back-to-back weekends, which will push the crews to the max.

IndyCar’s schedule was first-half heavy, with 13 of the 19 races between March 24 and July 14, and only six the rest of the way through October 19. The insane stretch of weekends from before Indianapolis in May through Toronto in July featured exactly one off weekend, June 28-30, which was ludicrous. But now IndyCar is into a heavy stretch of breaks, too: three weeks from Toronto (July 14) to Mid-Ohio (August 4), another three weeks until Sonoma (August 25), and a full month between Baltimore (Sept. 1) and Houston (Oct. 5-6).

News is at a minimum particularly in the dog days of July and August which means speculation runs rampant, and the “silly season” rumor mill heats up. Honestly, it’s just a way to fill space and print, and when you prefer official announcements to guesswork (as I do), it tends to grate. It’s kind of that in-between “we’re not at the awesome, exciting starting portion” and the “thrilling, championship chase climax” points of the year. We’re just kind of along for the ride.

The difference for F1 and IndyCar, unlike the summer baseball months for instance, is that on-track activity ceases to exist save for a few tests here or there, because of cost cutbacks. There’s not a daily grind of games, but there is a thrash at race team shops, as crews work tirelessly to find that extra aerodynamic or damper improvement that could provide that necessary extra tenth or two to put them over the top. You don’t see it, unfortunately, because teams aren’t going to be giving away their secrets.

Breaks are good, but this year’s been tough in the way the schedules have shaken out to provide a consistent dose of open-wheel racing either every weekend or at least every other weekend. It’s something I hope the schedule-makers can rectify in part for 2014.

Carb Day: Tony Kanaan is fastest in final practice for Sunday’s Indy 500

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Tony Kanaan wants to put legendary driver and team owner A.J. Foyt back into Victory Lane at the Indianapolis 500.

Kanaan took a big step toward achieving that goal in Friday’s final practice for Sunday’s 102nd running of the Greatest Spectacle In Racing.

Kanaan was fastest of the 33-driver field, with a best lap around the 2.5-mile Indianapolis Motor Speedway oval at 227.791 mph, more than 2 mph faster than the second-fastest driver, Kanaan’s former teammate, Scott Dixon (225.684 mph).

Foyt won a record-tying four Indy 500’s as a driver. It’s been nearly 20 years since he also won as a team owner in 1999 with Kenny Brack behind the wheel.

Marco Andretti was third-fastest (225.200 mph), followed by Sebastien Bourdais (224.815), Charlie Kimball (224.712), 2017 Indy 500 winner Takuma Sato (224.083), Will Power (223.942), Danica Patrick (223.653), Spencer Pigot (223.584) and Ed Jones (223.556).

Other notable driver speeds included:

* Pole sitter Ed Carpenter was 14th fastest (223.219 mph).

* Reigning Verizon IndyCar Series champ Josef Newgarden was 15th (223.186 mph).

* Helio Castroneves, hoping to earn a record-tying fourth 500 win, was 17th (222.913 mph).

* Graham Rahal was 21st (222.526).

* Former 500 winner Ryan Hunter-Reay was 26th (221.916 mph), followed by rookie Robert Wickens (221.821 mph), carrying the mantle for Schmidt Peterson Motorsports with James Hinchcliffe having failed to qualify for the race.

* The biggest surprise was 2016 Indy 500 winner Alexander Rossi, who was 32nd fastest (221.374 mph).

We’ll have the full speed grid, as well as full driver quotes, shortly. Please check back soon.

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