Ganassi: Baltimore one of few places it hasn’t won

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Chip Ganassi’s team has done almost everything there is to do in terms of winning American open-wheel races between CART, Indy Racing League and now INDYCAR iterations.

One thing it hasn’t done, yet, is win on the streets of Baltimore.

The Target and secondary “G2” squads are 0-for-2 since the race’s introduction in 2011. In fact, the team has yet to even score a podium, with the Penske, Andretti, KV, Schmidt and now-defunct Newman/Haas Racing having secured five of the race’s six podiums.

But the Ganassi team couldn’t be hotter coming into the weekend. Even despite the penalty assessed to Scott Dixon Sunday in Sonoma, the team has secured nine of the last 15 IndyCar race podiums. Dixon has three wins, Dario Franchitti has four third-place finishes, and Charlie Kimball has a win and a second-place result for the Novo Nordisk camp since Pocono July 7, the first race after a team test at Sebring in late June that has paid huge dividends.

A year ago, Dixon and Franchitti made it into the Fast Six and Kimball had his best qualifying effort of the season in seventh, although he would have to start 17th because of an unapproved engine change that cost him 10 spots on the starting grid.

A win for Dixon here would prove pivotal in the championship chase, as he enters the weekend trailing Helio Castroneves by 39 points. Meanwhile a win for Franchitti would break a winless drought dating to Indianapolis 2012. Will Power’s Sonoma win was his first since the race before the 2012 ‘500, and if that’s a sense of anything, then maybe it will be Franchitti’s day on Sunday.

Franchitti has won at 23 different circuits in his illustrious IndyCar career dating to his rookie season in 1997, while Dixon has triumphed at 20 different venues. Baltimore would be another notch on the belt for either of them.

Reviewing Danica Patrick’s highs and lows at Indianapolis Motor Speedway

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So much of Danica Patrick’s fame can be traced to Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

It’s where she became a household name 13 years ago when she became the first woman to lead the Indianapolis 500 and emerged as a transcendent athlete.

It’s where everything started. This Sunday, it’s where everything will end, too.

In her last warmup before starting the final race of her career, Patrick had a bumpy final practice Friday on Carb Day. She was eighth fastest, but her Dallara-Chevrolet was in the garage most of the session because of an electrical problem in the engine. After returning during the final 10 minutes of the session, Patrick’s No. 13 seemed to be OK.

“At the end of the day, these are things you’re actually glad for, because if this had happened Sunday, we would have been done,” she said. “I’m glad to get the issues out of the way early on. Overall, today felt good. We made some changes when I went out the second time, and I’m feeling good about starting seventh on Sunday.”
Though she has had her share of success – along with a fourth in her debut, there was a third in 2009 and six top 10s in seven starts — Patrick has learned well how to handle frustration at the 2.5-mile track, too.

Fuel mileage might have kept her from winning her debut, a pit collision ruined 2008, and an unstable setup made 2010 a wild ride.

For a review of her up-and-down history at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, and her legacy in racing, watch the video essay above that ran during Friday’s NASCAR America Motorsports Special on NBCSN.