Ganassi: Baltimore one of few places it hasn’t won

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Chip Ganassi’s team has done almost everything there is to do in terms of winning American open-wheel races between CART, Indy Racing League and now INDYCAR iterations.

One thing it hasn’t done, yet, is win on the streets of Baltimore.

The Target and secondary “G2” squads are 0-for-2 since the race’s introduction in 2011. In fact, the team has yet to even score a podium, with the Penske, Andretti, KV, Schmidt and now-defunct Newman/Haas Racing having secured five of the race’s six podiums.

But the Ganassi team couldn’t be hotter coming into the weekend. Even despite the penalty assessed to Scott Dixon Sunday in Sonoma, the team has secured nine of the last 15 IndyCar race podiums. Dixon has three wins, Dario Franchitti has four third-place finishes, and Charlie Kimball has a win and a second-place result for the Novo Nordisk camp since Pocono July 7, the first race after a team test at Sebring in late June that has paid huge dividends.

A year ago, Dixon and Franchitti made it into the Fast Six and Kimball had his best qualifying effort of the season in seventh, although he would have to start 17th because of an unapproved engine change that cost him 10 spots on the starting grid.

A win for Dixon here would prove pivotal in the championship chase, as he enters the weekend trailing Helio Castroneves by 39 points. Meanwhile a win for Franchitti would break a winless drought dating to Indianapolis 2012. Will Power’s Sonoma win was his first since the race before the 2012 ‘500, and if that’s a sense of anything, then maybe it will be Franchitti’s day on Sunday.

Franchitti has won at 23 different circuits in his illustrious IndyCar career dating to his rookie season in 1997, while Dixon has triumphed at 20 different venues. Baltimore would be another notch on the belt for either of them.

March 29 in Motorsports History: Scott Dixon wins first race after reunification

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Reunited and it felt so good.

That’s what drivers likely thought before the 2008 IndyCar opener at Homestead-Miami Speedway.

For the first time since 1995, major-league open-wheel racing in the United States was under the banner of a sole sanctioning body as Champ Car and the Indy Racing Leauge had reunified just a month prior.

Scott Dixon celebrates after winning the 2008 IndyCar opener at Homestead. Photo: Jim Hines/IndyCar.

The first race after reunification also saw a reversal of fortunes for Scott Dixon, who won the race after losing the 2007 IRL championship in crushing fashion.

In the 2007 season finale at Chicagoland Speedway, Dixon ran out of fuel while leading on the final lap of the race. The race victory – and championship – went to Dixon’s future teammate, Dario Franchitti.

But the tides turned for Dixon nearly seven months later, and the Kiwi was able to win with the help of another driver’s misfortune.

Tony Kanaan was leading with seven laps remaining when E.J. Viso spun and made contact with Kanaan’s car. Kanaan remained on track through the caution period despite suffering obvious damage to his right front suspension.

On the final restart with three laps remaining, Dixon and others cars easily passed Kanaan’s wounded car on the outside. Dixon then maintained his lead through the checkered flag to win at Homestead for the second time in his career.

“I think Marco (Andretti) and T.K. probably had a little bit better cars today, but we came through with the win, and that’s what counts,” Dixon told ESPN after his 12th career victory.

Following his victory at Homestead, Dixon continued to redeem himself through the course of the 2008 season. In May, he won the Indianapolis 500 for the first (and so far only) time. Following Indy, he went on to win four more times in 2008 and won his second series championship.

Also on this date:

1998: Mika Hakkinen won the Grand Prix of Brazil, the first of eight victories in his first championship season.

2010: Will Power won the Honda Grand Prix of St. Petersburg, which was held on a Monday morning because of rain postponing the race on Sunday.

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