Ferrari: No driver announcement at Monza

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All hopes of Ferrari making an announcement regarding its driver line-up for next season at the Italian Grand Prix next weekend have been doused after the team dismissed the move on its official website.

Kimi Raikkonen has been frequently linked to the team in recent weeks, with the Finn thought to be in line to replace Felipe Massa for 2014. However, although such a move has not been denied by either party, the team did confirm that no announcement would be made at its home grand prix at Monza next weekend despite popular opinion being that this is a “custom” for the team.

“Often in Formula 1, these customs are created artificially, just because they sound nice or because they can be made to fit one’s theories about something,” the team explained in its Horse Whisperer blog. “One of these states that the Scuderia likes to announce its driver line-up for the following year at the Italian Grand Prix.

“Well, I’m sorry to disappoint all those with feverish imaginations, who are awaiting Monza in trepidation, but this particular presumed custom is a non-starter.”

Monza is thought to be the ideal location for any announcements from Ferrari, being the team’s home grand prix and playing host to thousands of fans – the Tifosi – who are draped in team colours for the weekend. However, history shows that making an announcement at the race is a rarity.

“All one needs to do is look at the facts,” the article stated. “From 1991, when the Maranello press office first began to put its official pronouncements down on paper, until now, only twice, in 2006 and 2008, has the team’s home grand prix provided the backdrop to an announcement regarding the drivers.”

Therefore, it is unlikely that we will see a conclusion to this part of ‘silly season’ any time soon.

Read NBC’s team-by-team guide to the driver market here.

Morris Nunn, former IndyCar and F1 engineer, team owner dies at 79

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Morris Nunn, a former Formula 1 team owner and a prominent fixture in the American Open Wheel Racing scene through the 1990s and the early 2000s, died at 79 on Wednesday after a long battle with Parkinson’s disease, according to the Indianapolis Star.

Nunn’s career in racing spans both sides of the Atlantic. He started in the 1960s as a driver before shifting his attention toward the mechanical side of the sport. He then founded a Formula 1 effort, dubbed Ensign Racing, which competed in over 100 F1 races between 1973 and 1982 – the team had a best result of fourth.

However, Nunn may be best known in the U.S. for his exploits in American Open Wheel Racing. He crossed the pond after closing the Ensign outfit in 1982, and was a part of the Patrick Racing team that won the 1989 Indianapolis 500 with Emerson Fittipaldi.

He moved to Chip Ganassi Racing in the 1990s, where he perhaps achieved the bulk of his success. He worked with Alex Zanardi as both his crew chief and engineer during Zanardi’s tenure from 1996 to 1998, and the combination saw Zanardi take Rookie of the Year Honors in ’96, followed by a pair of championships in ’97 and ’98 in the old CART series.

31 May 1997: Alex Zanardi (left) of Italy talks to Mo Nunn , engineer for the Target Ganassi Racing Team, at The Milwaukee Mile in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Nunn also won the 1999 championship with then CART rookie Juan Pablo Montoya.

In 2000, he formed his own team, Mo Nunn Racing, with driver Tony Kanaan – Bryan Herta also contested a trio of events for Nunn that year after Kanaan suffered an injury – and the outfit grew to two cars in 2001, with Zanardi competing alongside Kanaan.

Nunn also ventured into the series that is now called the Verizon IndyCar Series in 2002, fielding an entry for Felipe Giaffone. They went on to win one race that year (Kentucky Speedway) and Nunn’s outfit won another in 2003, with Alex Barron at Michigan International Speedway.

Nunn was a popular and highly regarded figure in the paddock, and a number of people in the racing world took to social media to offer condolences and tributes.

IndyCar on NBC’s Robin Miller offered this detailed look at Nunn’s life in the sport on RACER.com, covering the origins of his career and the impact he had on such drivers as Zanardi and Montoya.

Nunn was 79 years of age at the time of his passing.

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