Top 10 drivers in Formula One history: Positions 6-4

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The run up to the United States release of “Rush” is on, and to mark the occasion, the NBC Sports team has assembled a countdown of the Top 10 drivers in the history of Formula One.

We’ll be revealing our picks for this very special list over the next couple of weeks here on MotorSportsTalk. We focused on positions 10 through 7 in the first post, and here’s the next batch of three, numbers 6 to 4…

No. 6 – Fernando Alonso

source: Getty Images
Fernando Alonso – Getty Images

The first active driver on our countdown, Alonso emerged at the head of F1’s new breed of young talent in the early-to-mid-2000s. He debuted as a teenager with Minardi in 2001, and his first of 32 career victories, the 2003 Hungarian Grand Prix, earned him the distinction of youngest Grand Prix winner. He achieved a similar accolade – youngest World Champion – at age 24 in 2005, his first of two consecutive titles. But that mark has been eclipsed twice since as Alonso’s bounced around from Renault, where he won both his titles, to a tumultuous single season at McLaren, back to Renault, and then to his current seat at Ferrari. In the last five or six years, Alonso frequently has had to outperform his machinery to remain in title contention, and is still widely regarded as the most complete driver on the grid today.

No. 5 – Jim Clark

source: Getty Images
Jim Clark – Getty Images

The Scot won the 1963 and 1965 World Championships and in the latter year, he also won the Indianapolis 500. Clark’s versatility, poise, confidence, pace and ability behind the wheel were his trademarks, and during the 1960s he and Colin Chapman’s Team Lotus set the benchmark for success in F1. His Grand Prix career included what were records at the time of 25 victories and 33 pole positions, although those have since been eclipsed.  Tragically, the talented driver was killed in a Formula Two race at the Hockenheimring in 1968. Clark’s legacy lives on for those who were fortunate enough to see him race. Clark’s impact was profound on Dario Franchitti, three-time Indianapolis 500 and four-time IZOD IndyCar Series champion, as he considers Clark his racing hero.

No. 4 – Sebastian Vettel

source: Getty Images
Sebastian Vettel – Getty Images

Vettel was destined for stardom from the moment he entered F1, and over the last five years, he’s performed a nearly unrivaled assault on the record books. Like Alonso he debuted as a teenager, and scored a point on his debut for BMW Sauber in the 2007 U.S. Grand Prix. He became the youngest race winner a year later with Scuderia Toro Rosso, formerly Minardi, at Monza in 2008. He won Red Bull’s first race in 2009 and in 2010, made it to the top of the mountain where he has established residency as F1’s youngest World Champion at age 23. Three consecutive titles, 32 victories, 40 pole positions later and with a current lead of more than 50 points in the 2013 campaign, there’s no telling when Vettel and Red Bull-Renault’s run of success will stop.

We will reveal the remaining drivers in our Top 10 after the Singapore Grand Prix on Sept. 22.

Make sure to follow all of Friday’s Indy 500 ‘Carb Day’ action on NBCSN from Indianapolis

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It’s known as “Carburetor Day” – or in its simplest term, just “Carb Day.”

But the final day of on-track action Friday at Indianapolis Motor Speedway before Sunday’s 102nd Running of the Indianapolis 500 is so much more.

Especially on NBCSN, which will have wall-to-wall live coverage starting Friday morning.

Here’s how Friday’s schedule breaks down:

  • 11 a.m. ET: Carb Day kicks off with the final practice for Sunday’s Indy 500. The session will last one hour in length.
  • 12 p.m. ET: We’re going racing! Strap in for coverage of the Indy Lights’ Freedom 100 on the famous Brickyard.
  • 1:30 p.m. ET: We’ll have coverage of the annual IndyCar Pit Stop Challenge. Which teams have the best – and most importantly, fastest and accurate – pit crews? Team Penske has won 10 of the last 12, including the last two years edging out Schmidt Peterson Motorsports each time. Who can potentially beat them this year?
  • 3:30 p.m. ET: We’ll have our annual NASCAR America Motorsports Special. Among segments included in the 90-minute show will be:1) 2016 Indy 500 winner Alexander Rossi will discuss how it used to upset him when people suggested he “backed into” his big win and how he didn’t really feel vindicated until he qualified on the front row for last year’s race.
    2) Defending 500 winner Takuma Sato, the first Japanese driver to ever win at Indianapolis, discusses the impact of his big win personally and professionally, particularly back in his native land.
    3) An essay by Robin Miller on Stefan Wilson giving up his ride last year to allow Fernando Alonso to race for Andretti Autosport.
    4) An essay by Nate Ryan on Danica Patrick as she looks to compete in her final Indy 500 before retiring from professional racing.

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