IMS road course race: The glass half-full outlook

2 Comments

On the fence about how to feel regarding an IndyCar road race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway? Feeling overly positive and need a sprinkle of negativity in your coffee? Or vice versa? Here’s some potential upsides and downsides of the first race to be held next May. We’ll start with the positives first. Feel free to add more in the comments.

POSITIVE ARGUMENTS

  • A needed title sponsor that won’t affect the Indianapolis 500. The day the Indianapolis 500 adds a title sponsor, it becomes just another race. This gives Corporate America a shot to say it sponsors an IndyCar race at Indianapolis, and isn’t “the bad guy” who will forever be known as “the sponsor that took over naming rights for the ‘500.”
  • Track upgrades. The Speedway has pledged to make improvements based on the feedback of drivers Graham Rahal and Ryan Briscoe, who tested there earlier this month. If it’s a better track, even more reason this race could be great. Consider too, the Dallara DW12 chassis has spiced up races at otherwise dull road courses Barber Motorsports Park and Sonoma Raceway – why not at the Speedway?
  • Marketing bonanzas. A points and/or cash prize for a sweep of the road course race and the ‘500? All-star wild card entries for one or both events? A test on the next level of the ladder for anyone who wins a Mazda Road to Indy road race? Frankly the opportunities are endless for cross-promotion between the two events. Additionally, thinking from a corporate perspective, it’s double the chances to entertain clients in corporate suites and show the variety IndyCar has to offer.
  • A potential Mazda Road to Indy ladder weekend. For anyone who’s been to the Night Before the 500 at Lucas Oil Raceway Park with Pro Mazda and USF2000 on the docket, it feels like a night at a high school football game. It’s cozy, comfortable with intense on-field action. But it ain’t the big show. For the lower two rungs on the ladder, the cars aren’t able to run the Speedway oval because of skinny tires, not enough power and downforce. This could give them the opportunity to race at the pro-sized stadium and at speeds and a form of racing – road course racing – they are familiar with.

My take:  All I want is for the race to have a chance to be successful instead of dismissing it in advance. If it proves a bad proposition, either from an optics or business standpoint, then you dump it. But otherwise, it’s here, and ideally can grow from its inaugural running.

Ken Roczen signs with HEP Progressive Ecstar Suzuki for 2023

Roczen Progressive Ecstar Suzuki
Align Media
0 Comments

ANAHEIM, California – Ken Roczen will make the move from HRC Honda to H.E.P. Motorsports with the Progressive Ecstar Suzuki team, ending a long and eventful offseason that saw his split from his longstanding team after he committed to running World Supercross (WSX).

“H.E.P. Motorsports is thrilled to announce that the team has signed Ken Roczen as its premier rider for the 2023 season,” the team announced on Instagram. “Former AMA Motocross champion Roczen will be aboard a Suzuki RM-Z450. Roczen, who won his most recent championship on a Suzuki, will be reunited with the brand and bring his exciting style, determination, and grit back to the RM Army.

“Ken Roczen will compete in the upcoming 2023 Supercross and Motocross Championship series which is set to start on January 7 at Anaheim Stadium in Southern California.”

For Roczen, it is a return to the bike of his youth and on which he had some of his greatest professional success.

“This thing has been going on for weeks and weeks and weeks in the making, but there was so much uncertainty,” Roczen told NBC Sports during Monster Energy Supercross Media Sessions. “It was a very unique situation. I just finally signed two nights ago, so it’s really only legit once the ink hits the paper. It’s been in the works for a long time, but there were just a lot of questions and a lot of input from a lot of other teams too.

“Good things take time, and I’m okay with that. I grew up riding Suzuki. Ot’s like a homecoming. It’s a special feeling”

Roczen won the 2016 Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship on a Suzuki before making the move to Honda. That year he won nine of 12 Nationals and finished no worse than second as he easily outpaced Eli Tomac by 86 points. He finished third in his next Pro Motocross outing in 2018 after sitting out the outdoor season in 2017.

“I am beyond excited to reconnect with Suzuki for the 3rd time in my career. We’ve had a lot of success in the past and I’m looking forward to seeing what we can accomplish together in our future.” Roczen said in the Instagram post.