New Jersey featured on 22 race provisional F1 calendar

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The proposed Grand Prix of America at New Jersey has been featured on the World Motor Sport Council’s provisional calendar for the 2014 Formula One season, marking a huge step forward for the second race in the U.S.

The previous ‘draft’ schedule that was circulated at the Italian Grand Prix did not feature the race, but this was purely because the organizers at GP America had failed to submit their application to the national authorities. However, a spokesperson for the race confirmed to NBC Sports in Singapore that the required paperwork had been handed in.

As a result, the race has been given a tentative date of June 1 for 2014, being the middle weekend of a triple-header of races that will see the F1 circus visit Monaco, New Jersey and Montreal all in the space of twenty-one days.

The season will start – as tradition dictates – in Australia on March 16, coming to a close on the final day of November in Brazil. It will be by far the longest Formula One season to date in terms of both races and actual days.

The calendar features three other new races besides New Jersey: Russia, Mexico and Austria. F1 last visited Mexico in 1992, with Austria’s final grand prix being hosted in 2003.

In a couple of other minor changes, Bahrain moves to the third round of the season, swapping places with China, whilst the Korean Grand Prix swaps its fall date for one at the end of April.

It is worth noting that Korea, New Jersey and Mexico are all ‘provisional’, with the circuits still requiring approval.

Provisional 2014 FIA Formula One World Championship Calendar

16th March – Australian Grand Prix
30 March – Malaysian Grand Prix
6th April – Bahrain Grand Prix
20th April – Chinese Grand Prix
27th April – Korean Grand Prix*
11th May – Spanish Grand Prix
25th May – Monaco Grand Prix
1st June – Grand Prix of America (New Jersey)*
8th June – Canadian Grand Prix
22nd June – Austrian Grand Prix
6th July – British Grand Prix
20th July – German Grand Prix (Hockenheim)
27th July – Hungarian Grand Prix
24th August – Belgian Grand Prix
7th September – Italian Grand Prix
21st September – Singapore Grand Prix
5th October – Russian Grand Prix
12th October – Japanese Grand Prix
26th October – Abu Dhabi Grand Prix
9th November – United States Grand Prix
16th November – Mexican Grand Prix*
30th November – Brazilian Grand Prix

Eli Tomac, Ken Roczen’s two-man battle in Motocross provides surprises

Rich Shepherd, ProMotocross
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The 2019 Motocross season is one-third in the books and the title battle may have already come down to a two-man contest, while the pair of contenders might just be a little surprising in their own way.

Strictly by the numbers, no one can count Eli Tomac’s early season charge of first- and second-place finishes shocking, but threepeating in Motocross is such an incredibly difficult feat that no one would have been surprised to see him struggle out of the gates either. And in fact, that is precisely what happened.

Tomac came out of the gates slow in Round 1 and was seventh by the end of Lap 1 of Moto 1 – hardly the auspicious start he hoped for. He rebounded only as far as fourth and that ultimately cost him a chance to win the overall. Tomac won Moto 2 to claim second overall.

In Round 2, Tomac found his rhythm and won both Motos and grabbed the red plate. For the moment, he had the momentum with three consecutive Moto wins.

Tomac stumbled again in Round 3 – this time finishing only fifth in Moto 1 and earning only 16 points to dig a deep hole that eventually surrendered the red plate to Ken Roczen.

It was at Thunder Valley in Round 3 that a pattern emerged. Tomac would not make it easy on himself early in the day, but was more than capable of winning the second Motos to overcome his deficit.

That Roczen has won this season is also not a surprise in itself. Many believed his ascent to the top step of the podium was way overdue.

That he has run so well, however, was not entirely expected at the start of the season. Since injuring both arms in a pair of accidents, Roczen came tantalizingly close to snapping his winless streak a dozen times. He won heat races during the Supercross season and finished second at Anaheim I, Minneapolis, Dallas, and Seattle earlier this year.

He just couldn’t secure the overall win.

Roczen’s Moto 1 victory at Hangtown might have been the precursor to another disappointing weekend, but once Tomac got into the lead, Roczen zeroed in on the Kawasaki’s back tire and finished second in route to the overall victory.

Roczen lost the overall and the red plate to Tomac in Round 2 at Pala, but he stood on the podium in both Motos. Roczen podiumed twice again in Round 3 while taking that overall victory to regain the red plate in what has become a seesaw affair in the early part of the 2019 season.

Last week, Roczen looked more like Tomac with his desperate struggle in Moto 1 and sixth-place finish. That was the first (and so far only) time this season that he failed to stand on the podium.

Roczen’s Moto 2 win last week was just enough to put him second overall with barely enough points to force a tie at the top of the leaderboard with 176 points apiece.

Meanwhile, Tomac failed to win either Moto with a third in the first race and runner-up finish in the second.

The moral victory and advantage may shift to Roczen this week.

As they have swapped the victory in the first four rounds with Roczen winning the odd-numbered events, he sees this weekend’s Round 5 as an opportunity.

“I’m looking forward to next weekend’s race,” Roczen said in a team press release. “The track is sandy. It’s very similar—actually almost identical—to what I ride on a regular basis at home.”

Tomac and Roczen enter Round 5 with a 32-point advantage over two riders tied for third in the standings.

So far Zach Osborne and Jason Anderson have not been in the same league as the leaders, but it only takes one slip of the wheel to fall out of the points in in a race and allow these racers to close the gap.

Season passes can be purchased at NBC Sports Gold.

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