Michael Waltrip Racing confirms drop to two full-time cars in ’14 (UPDATED)

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UPDATE (2:30 p.m. ET): Michael Waltrip Racing has officially confirmed a drop to two full-time cars, the No. 15 5-Hour Energy and No. 55 Aaron’s Toyotas, for next year’s Sprint Cup season. The team’s workforce will be cut by 15 percent as a result.

A third MWR car will be rolled out for a partial 2014 schedule that includes the Daytona 500, which team co-owner Waltrip himself will compete in.

Additionally, driver Martin Truex Jr. and his crew chief, Chad Johnston, have been informed that they are free to negotiate with other teams. MWR executive vice president of competition Scott Miller will continue on as crew chief for the team’s No. 55 car.

“Today was about doing what we had to do, not what we wanted to do,” co-owner Rob Kauffman said in his statement. “It was important to let those whose jobs were affected know as early as possible, and a majority of those will remain with MWR through the end of the season.”

The Associated Press first reported this morning that MWR would downsize to two cars in 2014 due to the departure of major team sponsor NAPA Auto Parts.

Shortly after MWR’s attempt to manipulate the finish of the Sept. 7 race at Richmond International Raceway and secure a Chase for the Sprint Cup spot for Truex, NAPA announced it would leave the squad at the conclusion of the 2013 season. 5-Hour Energy and Aaron’s, the team’s other major sponsors, have since decided to continue their support.

NAPA has been by Waltrip’s side through his two Daytona 500 victories (2001, 2003) and the inception of MWR in 2007, but also has had to face two severe controversies with him: The 2007 “jet fuel” episode that involved MWR leading up to that year’s Daytona 500 and last month’s scandal at Richmond.

The company’s call to leave MWR was perhaps the most devastating hit to the team post-Richmond, even more so than the series of penalties levied by NASCAR that resulted in Truex getting booted from the Chase, the team getting fined $300,000, and its general manager, Ty Norris, being suspended indefinitely.

Valtteri Bottas wins chaotic season-opening F1 Austrian Grand Prix

Mark Thompson/Getty Images
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SPIELBERG, Austria — Valtteri Bottas won a chaotic season-opening F1 Austrian Grand Prix while six-time series champion Lewis Hamilton finished fourth after getting a late time penalty Sunday.

The Formula One race was interrupted three times by a safety car, and nine of 20 drivers abandoned, including both Red Bulls of Max Verstappen and Alexander Albon – who tried to overtake Hamilton on the outside with 10 laps left, touched wheels and flew off track.

Hamilton was given a 5-second time penalty for causing the collision, having earlier been hit with a three-place grid penalty after an incident in Saturday’s qualifying was reviewed by stewards.

SHOW OF SUPPORT: Drivers take knee before race

Bottas led all 71 laps in the eighth victory of his career. It was the second consecutive victory in the season opener for the Finn, though he won four months earlier in 2019 after this season’s start was delayed by the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Lando Norris of McLaren F1 celebrates after his first podium finish (Mark Thompson/Getty Images).

Bottas started from pole position and Hamilton from fifth, but it looked like a straight fight between the two Mercedes drivers as has been the case so often in recent years.

But late drama in Spielberg ensured otherwise and Hamilton’s time penalty meant Charles Leclerc took second place for Ferrari, and Lando Norris sent McLaren’s garage into raptures – and threw all social distancing rules out of the window amid the euphoria – with third place.

It was the 20-year-old British driver’s first career podium, and his superb final lap was the fastest of a dramatic season opener.

Norris became the youngest British driver to secure a podium finish and the third-youngest ever in Formula One.

Valtteri Bottas leads Mercedes teammate Lewis Hamilton during the Formula One Grand Prix of Austria (Mark Thompson/Getty Images).