IMS radio voice Mike King will step down

4 Comments

There will be a new “voice of the Indianapolis 500” on the IMS Radio Network next May. The question is whether it will be a completely new voice or a familiar old friend.

The position is open because Mike King, the longtime voice for IMSRN since 1996, and the voice of the ‘500 since 1999, will step down on November 1 to tend to family and other business responsibilities, per an IMS release. King started as a pit reporter in 1995.

“I would like to thank the Hulman-George family and the entire INDYCAR family for an incredible 19 years with the IMS Radio Network,” King said in the release. “Calling the Indy 500 and every other IndyCar Series race has fulfilled so many of my hopes and dreams. I loved every second of it, especially that special connection with the fans over the airwaves. But I’m also looking forward to this next phase of my life, including dedicating more time to my family, which always has been so understanding and supportive while I was on the road working with the network.”

King’s day job is working as a marketing and public relations specialist at Union Hospital in Terre Haute, Ind.

Some of the other voices on the IMS Radio Network include Jake Query (also a pit reporter for NBCSN’s Indy Lights coverage), IndyCar driver Pippa Mann, full season reporters Nick Yeoman, Mark Jaynes and Michael Young and other part-time voices that include Indiana Pacers broadcaster Chris Denari, Jerry Baker and Katie Hargitt, who was a pit reporter for a handful of events earlier this year.

Familiar voices who no doubt would stir the senses for longtime Indianapolis 500 and IndyCar fans include Bob Jenkins and Paul Page, but no word has been given as to whether either is a serious candidate for the role.

Whether this is merely King stepping down or a harbinger of other changes within the Hulman Racing division, under Hulman & Co. CEO Mark Miles, also remains to be seen. Miles has said throughout this year that some strategic changes would come under the Hulman Racing umbrella on the personnel side.

Keating stripped of Le Mans GTE-Am win; No. 68 Ganassi entry also disqualified

IMSA
2 Comments

FIA stewards announced Monday that two Ford GT entries have been disqualified from this year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans, including the GTE-Am class-winning No. 85 entry from privateer Keating Motorsports.

Also DQ’d was the factory No. 68 Chip Ganassi Racing entry of Joey Hand, Dirk Mueller and Sebastien Bourdais, which initially finished fourth in the GTE-Pro class.

Both entries were found in violation of fuel capacity regulations, with the No. 85 entry also failing to meet the minimum refueling time during pit stops.

The refueling system on the No. 85 entry, driven by Ben Keating, Jeroen Bleekemolen and Felipe Fraga, measured a time of 44.4 seconds during a stop, just shy of the minimum required time of 45 seconds.

As a result, the team was initially issued a 55.2-second post-race penalty by officials, which elevated the No. 56 Team Project 1 Porsche 911 RSR of Joerg Bergmeister, Patrick Lindsey, and Egidio Perfetti to the class win.

The time penalty was calculated by the difference in the refueling time (0.6 seconds) multiplied by the amount of pit stops made by the team (23), then multiplied by four.

The No. 85 entry was set to finish second in class, but then received an outright DQ after its fuel capacity was also revealed to be 0.1 liters above the maximum permitted capacity of 96 liters.

As for Ganassi’s No. 68 entry, it was found to have a fuel capacity of 97.83 liters, which is above the maximum allowed capacity of 97 liters for the GTE-Pro Fords.

The No. 67 Ford of Andy Priaulx, Harry Tincknell, and Jonathan Bomarito subsequently moves up to fourth, and the No. 69 Ford of Scott Dixon, Ryan Briscoe and Richard Westbrook moves up to fifth.

Follow Michael Eubanks on Twitter