IMS radio voice Mike King will step down

4 Comments

There will be a new “voice of the Indianapolis 500” on the IMS Radio Network next May. The question is whether it will be a completely new voice or a familiar old friend.

The position is open because Mike King, the longtime voice for IMSRN since 1996, and the voice of the ‘500 since 1999, will step down on November 1 to tend to family and other business responsibilities, per an IMS release. King started as a pit reporter in 1995.

“I would like to thank the Hulman-George family and the entire INDYCAR family for an incredible 19 years with the IMS Radio Network,” King said in the release. “Calling the Indy 500 and every other IndyCar Series race has fulfilled so many of my hopes and dreams. I loved every second of it, especially that special connection with the fans over the airwaves. But I’m also looking forward to this next phase of my life, including dedicating more time to my family, which always has been so understanding and supportive while I was on the road working with the network.”

King’s day job is working as a marketing and public relations specialist at Union Hospital in Terre Haute, Ind.

Some of the other voices on the IMS Radio Network include Jake Query (also a pit reporter for NBCSN’s Indy Lights coverage), IndyCar driver Pippa Mann, full season reporters Nick Yeoman, Mark Jaynes and Michael Young and other part-time voices that include Indiana Pacers broadcaster Chris Denari, Jerry Baker and Katie Hargitt, who was a pit reporter for a handful of events earlier this year.

Familiar voices who no doubt would stir the senses for longtime Indianapolis 500 and IndyCar fans include Bob Jenkins and Paul Page, but no word has been given as to whether either is a serious candidate for the role.

Whether this is merely King stepping down or a harbinger of other changes within the Hulman Racing division, under Hulman & Co. CEO Mark Miles, also remains to be seen. Miles has said throughout this year that some strategic changes would come under the Hulman Racing umbrella on the personnel side.

Dean Wilson’s life as a privateer reconnects the rider to his roots

Leave a comment

One of the added benefits of subscribing to NBC Sports Gold is the in-depth interviews from each Saturday’s action. Last week between the first and second rounds of qualification for the Glendale Supercross race, a relaxed and confident Dean Wilson joined Race Day Live’s Daniel Blair and Jim Holley to review his fourth-place finish in the season opener and his mindset moving forward.

Losing factory support from Rockstar / Husqvarna at the end of 2018 was not exactly what Wilson had in mind, but after getting off to a great start in the first two races this season, it may well have been a blessing in disguise.

The life of a privateer is not exactly relaxed, but it affords a rider the opportunity to call his own shots. For Wilson, it is also a way to reconnect with the grassroots feel that attracted him to Supercross in the first place.

“I think that’s what I like,” Wilson said on Race Day Live. “I think that’s the environment and atmosphere I like – it’s just more low key. At Anaheim I, you would think I was local racing at Glen Helen. I had a Sprinter and I had another trailer just to chill in, do my spins. It was so cold I had a little propane heater to warm me up. But I like that. That’s what works for me.”

MORE: Dean Wilson’s Cinderella story at Anaheim 

The program Wilson was able to put together during the offseason produced back-to back top 10s – a much better start to the 2019 season than he experienced last year.

In 2018, Wilson did not score a top 10 until his fourth feature at San Diego. His first top five would not come until late March in Indianapolis.

This year Wilson got the hole shot and led 14 laps at Anaheim in the opener before finishing fourth. Last week in Glendale, he finished eighth.

“What was going through my head was ‘it’s about time; it’s about five years too late to lead some laps here,’ ” Wilson described his emotion as he led at Anaheim. “It was nice because I did a lot of work in the off-season and my starts were really good. The thing is I haven’t over-analyzed my starts and practice.”

At Anaheim I, Wilson struggled with visibility as his goggles began to get fouled by mud. A once comfortable lead was eroded by Justin Barcia. With pressure from behind, Wilson made a minor mistake that was then compounded by lapped traffic.

“I was leading my laps; I was just trying to hit my marks. I was doing really well until I made a couple of mistakes. I couldn’t hit that middle double, double … the rut was getting real chewed out, but I was already on the right side where you couldn’t double the middle part so you had to go roll, roll, roll – and Barcia was already on me.”

Wilson’s pair of top 10s was enough to keep him fifth in the standings, three points behind Glendale’s winner Blake Baggett.

For more, watch the video above.

Next Race: Anaheim II Jan. 19, 11 p.m., NBCSN

Follow Dan Beaver on Twitter