Some Homestead stats to keep in mind today…

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With the Sprint Cup season finale set to go green in less than an hour at Homestead-Miami Speedway, here are a few statistical bits and pieces to remember as the Ford Ecoboost 400 goes on this afternoon:

– Since the inception of NASCAR’s points-based position system in 1975, only four drivers have made up a points deficit in the season finale: Richard Petty in 1979 (made up two points on Darrell Waltrip), Alan Kulwicki in 1992 (made up 30 points on Davey Allison), Jimmie Johnson in 2010 (made up 15 points on Denny Hamlin) and Tony Stewart in 2011 (made up three points on Carl Edwards). However, Stewart’s the only driver to do this under the current one-point-per-position structure.

– Five of the 14 Sprint Cup races at Homestead have been won from the front row, and nine of the 14 have been won from a Top-10 starting spot.

– Carl Edwards has the top average finish among Cup drivers at Homestead with a superb 6.0. Only two other drivers – Kevin Harvick (7.9) and Martin Truex, Jr. (9.8) – have an average finish at Homestead within the Top-10.

– Defending race champion Jeff Gordon leads the series with seven Top-5 finishes at Homestead; Edwards and Harvick follow him with five Top-5s apiece.

– Chase contenders have won seven of the nine previous Chase races at Homestead. Only one non-Chase contender has triumphed in that group of races: Greg Biffle, who won in 2004 and 2006.

– Jimmie Johnson needs to finish 23rd or better to win his sixth Sprint Cup. Johnson has competed 122 times on 1.5/1.54-mile tracks in his Sprint Cup career, and has finished worse than 23rd on those tracks a total of 21 times; of those 21 finishes of 23rd or worse, four have come at Homestead.

– Matt Kenseth trails Johnson by 28 points going into today’s race. He has out-pointed Johnson by that same margin in just two races this season: The August night race at Bristol and the Richmond fall race in September.

– Kevin Harvick is third in the championship at 34 points behind Johnson. Since Harvick does not have a tie-breaker over Johnson, he needs to out-point him by 35 points today. He’s only down that once this year: August at Michigan.

Morris Nunn, former IndyCar and F1 engineer, team owner dies at 79

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Morris Nunn, a former Formula 1 team owner and a prominent fixture in the American Open Wheel Racing scene through the 1990s and the early 2000s, died at 79 on Wednesday after a long battle with Parkinson’s disease, according to the Indianapolis Star.

Nunn’s career in racing spans both sides of the Atlantic. He started in the 1960s as a driver before shifting his attention toward the mechanical side of the sport. He then founded a Formula 1 effort, dubbed Ensign Racing, which competed in over 100 F1 races between 1973 and 1982 – the team had a best result of fourth.

However, Nunn may be best known in the U.S. for his exploits in American Open Wheel Racing. He crossed the pond after closing the Ensign outfit in 1982, and was a part of the Patrick Racing team that won the 1989 Indianapolis 500 with Emerson Fittipaldi.

He moved to Chip Ganassi Racing in the 1990s, where he perhaps achieved the bulk of his success. He worked with Alex Zanardi as both his crew chief and engineer during Zanardi’s tenure from 1996 to 1998, and the combination saw Zanardi take Rookie of the Year Honors in ’96, followed by a pair of championships in ’97 and ’98 in the old CART series.

31 May 1997: Alex Zanardi (left) of Italy talks to Mo Nunn , engineer for the Target Ganassi Racing Team, at The Milwaukee Mile in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Nunn also won the 1999 championship with then CART rookie Juan Pablo Montoya.

In 2000, he formed his own team, Mo Nunn Racing, with driver Tony Kanaan – Bryan Herta also contested a trio of events for Nunn that year after Kanaan suffered an injury – and the outfit grew to two cars in 2001, with Zanardi competing alongside Kanaan.

Nunn also ventured into the series that is now called the Verizon IndyCar Series in 2002, fielding an entry for Felipe Giaffone. They went on to win one race that year (Kentucky Speedway) and Nunn’s outfit won another in 2003, with Alex Barron at Michigan International Speedway.

Nunn was a popular and highly regarded figure in the paddock, and a number of people in the racing world took to social media to offer condolences and tributes.

IndyCar on NBC’s Robin Miller offered this detailed look at Nunn’s life in the sport on RACER.com, covering the origins of his career and the impact he had on such drivers as Zanardi and Montoya.

Nunn was 79 years of age at the time of his passing.

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