Humpy Wheeler tries to solve what’s wrong with IndyCar (VIDEO)

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As one of the greatest promoters in NASCAR history, Humpy Wheeler has never been short of ideas. And in his latest YouTube dispatch, the former president and GM of Charlotte Motor Speedway puts his mind toward trying to revive IndyCar racing’s mainstream presence.

In the five-minute-plus video, Wheeler commends IndyCar for its great on-track product but also critiques it on several fronts. To start off, he believes that the open-wheelers are simply too quick for those in the grandstands and that they need to be slowed down.

From there, he says that the IndyCar starting grid needs to be increased at every race to 33, which is the number of cars that take the green every May for the Indianapolis 500.

But then, he proceeds to go off on a tangent about the importance of the younger fans and how IndyCar should cater to them.

“You’re entertaining people – Who’s leading the race? What does he look like?” he says. “Little kid, 12 years old, he goes to a race. He’s been in video games, he’s seen all this great stuff. He can’t tell which car is which. You can’t confuse those people. They’re not coming back to a race if you confuse ’em!

“He’s not confusing a monster truck show, because monster trucks are big and huge, they got teeth, all these things on ’em. IndyCars are little teeny cars. A 12-year-old boy – why should he like ’em? Grow that car up, folks! Make it geared toward the 12-year-old, because the 12-year-old is tomorrow’s race fan.”

Finally, he closes with the thought that IndyCar ought to seek out more American drivers from the short-track ranks.

“[Foreign drivers] add to the spice, but let’s get some Saturday night heroes out of America and stick them in IndyCars,” he said. “That’s what’s made NASCAR so good – they got a great field of drivers from around the country.”

The whole video seems a bit bizarre to me. Wheeler’s an entertainer, so it’s only natural that he approaches IndyCar’s image problem from that perspective. Fair enough.

But while it may be true that most people can’t tell the difference between 225 and 195 mph – both are insanely fast to the average Joe – that extra speed is an important part of what makes an IndyCar, well, an IndyCar. From my standpoint, that additional 30-40 mph over the stock cars helped get me hooked on watching open-wheel during a time when it was bleeding fans during the Split.

Then there’s Wheeler’s idea of bigger starting grids. He mentions how there should be 33 at every race. Well, the 2011 IndyCar finale at Las Vegas Motor Speedway started with 34 cars.

We know how that ended. I’m fine with 24-26 cars at races outside of the ‘500,’ thanks.

Finally, the whole argument of adding more American drivers has been played out over and over. IndyCar’s an international sport. Americans should be a part of it, but if IndyCar were to have an all-American field like NASCAR, something would be missing.

Yes, Wheeler mentions he has nothing against the foreigners. But you get the sense that if he were in charge of IndyCar, he’d prefer the all-American field.

Altogether, a strange clip. But perhaps you agree with him? Or maybe you have your own ideas on what IndyCar should do? Drop ’em in the comment box if you like, just be sure to keep them clean.

Zach Veach splits with Andretti Autosport for rest of IndyCar season

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Zach Veach will be leaving his Andretti Autosport ride with three races remaining in the season, choosing to explore options after the decision was made he wouldn’t return for 2021.

In a Wednesday release, Andretti Autosport said a replacement driver for the No. 26 Dallara-Honda would be named in the coming days. The NTT IndyCar Series will race Oct. 2-3 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway road course and then conclude the season Oct. 25 on the streets of St. Petersburg, Florida.

Veach was ranked 11th in the points standings through 11 races of his third season with Andretti. Since a fourth in the June 6 season opener at Texas Motor Speedway, he hadn’t finished higher than 14th.

“The decision was made that I will not be returning in 2021 with Andretti Autosport in the No. 26 Gainbridge car,” Veach said in the Andretti release. “This, along with knowing that limited testing exists for teams due to COVID, have led me to the decision to step out of the car for the remainder of the 2020 IndyCar season. I am doing this to allow the team to have time with other drivers as they prepare for 2021, and so that I can also explore my own 2021 options.

“This is the hardest decision I have ever made, but to me, racing is about family, and it is my belief that you take care of your family. Andretti Autosport is my family and I feel this is what is best to help us all reach the next step. I will forever be grateful to Michael and the team for all of their support over the years. I would not be where I am today if it wasn’t for a relationship that started many years ago with Road to Indy. I will also be forever grateful to Dan Towriss for his friendship and for the opportunity he and Gainbridge have given me.

“My love for this sport and the people involved is unmeasurable, and I look forward to continuing to be amongst the racing world and fans in 2021.”

Said team owner Michael Andretti: “We first welcomed Zach to the Andretti team back in his USF2000 days and have enjoyed watching him grow and evolve as a racer, and a person. His decision to allow us to use the last few races to explore our 2021 options shows the measure of his character.

“Zach has always placed team and family first, and we’re very happy to have had him as part of ours for so many years. We wish him the best in whatever 2021 may bring and will always consider him a friend.”

Andretti fields five full-time cars for Veach, Alexander Rossi, Ryan Hunter-Reay, Marco Andretti and Colton Herta.

It also has fielded James Hinchcliffe in three races this season.