Edwards: NASCAR should change product, not formats

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Carl Edwards isn’t in charge of NASCAR, nor will be anytime soon. Still, doesn’t mean the Roush Fenway Racing driver can’t offer opinions on potential technical or format changes for the Sprint Cup Series.

“I’d like much softer tires and less downforce, but the process for new changes was really impressive, the way it was tested,” he said during his first media availability of 2014 during the NASCAR Preseason Thunder test at Daytona. “Of the three things tested, they chose the best one in my opinion.”

Edwards is referring to the raised rear spoiler for 2014, which should actually increase downforce. He joked, “I’d be all for chopping the spoilers off and wetting down the track.”

But, in all seriousness, Edwards praised the unified and increased competition committee involving Brian France, Mike Helton, John Darby, Gene Stefanyshyn and now, Darby’s replacement as managing director of the Sprint Cup Series, Richard Buck. The committee is seeking to improve NASCAR’s racing product, particularly on the 1.5-mile ovals where passing wasn’t particularly easy during the first season with the new Generation-6 car.

“I’m not a very patient person, so it’s very difficult for me to go down this road,” Edwards said. “The coolest part of the test (last year) was, Brian France, Mike Helton, Darby, Stefanyshyn, all saying ‘We can make things better. We’ll work with Goodyear, they’re committed.’ Say what you like about NASCAR or directions, but they’re very committed to changing whatever it takes to be the best we can be. It makes me excited.”

When it came to format changes rather than competition ones, Edwards guarded against change simply for the sake of change.

“It would be like the police changing the speed limit every day when you go down the same road. At some point you’d be like, ‘C’mon, man,’” Edwards admitted.

“There’s something to be said about the history of the sport, not moving things too far away, and I also think we have to be careful … we don’t want take away the credibility of a format by changing it all the time. We need the same measure year-to-year. You don’t want to change all the time just to change.”

Because Edwards’ team has traditionally run consistently stronger over a longer stretch of races rather than the 10 Chase races, he wouldn’t mind seeing the Chase add more races, but didn’t estimate it would happen.

After losing the 2011 Cup title on a tiebreaker, Edwards missed the Chase in 2012 and finished 13th and last in this year’s Chase. Edwards won twice, though, marking only his second season with more than one win in the last five years.

See Will Power ‘in the flesh’ as he’ll appear on Indy 500-winning Borg-Warner Trophy

Matthew Thacker
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Will Power has had thousands of photos taken of him during his racing career by media, fans, family and friends.

But Power has never undergone the type of photos – and the sitting/modeling he took part in, posing for the image of him that will adorn the Borg-Warner Trophy, symbolic of Power’s win in this year’s Indianapolis 500.

Power on Thursday was at the Tryon, North Carolina studio of noted artist and sculptor William Behrends to complete the finishing touches on the clay model of his face and head.

From there, Behrends will create a miniature version of Power’s likeness to be placed on the Borg-Warner Trophy, which is set to be unveiled December 5 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum.

“It’s actually really cool to come in the first time and see your face there,” Power told MotorSportsTalk. “All the experiences that goes with the Indy 500 are just all great, and it’s amazing I’m sitting there getting my face sculpted to go on the Borg Warner.”

Power discussed the procedure Behrends went through with him.

“He took photos the day after the race, multiple ones, all the way around my face, the whole periphery of it,” he said. “And then he started sculpting the clay face we see right now, my head.

“And then he had me sit there to get it closer. It’s pretty good as it is, but yeah, he sits there and works on it until he thinks it’s right-on. That’s why he had me there in-person.”

Does it look like you, Will?

“Yes, yes. It was funny, because you’re always looking in the mirror and it’s a reverse of your face,” he said. “No one’s face is completely symmetrical.

“It is funny seeing yourself for the first time like you can almost say in the flesh, an actual model of your face and it looks different from what you expect.”

Power was a perfect subject, Behrends said.

“Oh, he’s a wonderful subject, just a very affable, easy-going guy,” Behrends said. “He was very good company during the sittings.

“These sittings I think, are rather difficult for the subject just because he’s just sitting there. I’m working, but the subject has to sit there for long periods of time.

Will Power watches as sculptor William Behrends puts the finishing touches on the clay molding of Power’s face and head. Photo: Matthew Thacker.

“But Will’s very, very cooperative and very easy-going and we had some very nice conversations.”

Power will be the 29th image that Behrends has created for the Borg-Warner Trophy, dating back to his first effort in 1990 with Arie Luyendyk.

“It doesn’t seem like it, but it’s that many years,” Behrends said. “This is the only thing I do that I’ve done more than once. All of my pieces are one-of-a-kind. But it becomes a regular thing on my calendar of the Fall.”

Behrends explained how the process has worked for nearly the last three decades. It starts with taking photos the day after the Indy 500 to rough drafting and sculpting the model, to having the winning driver come to his studio to do some final touches (as Power did Thursday), and then taking the completed clay model and replicating it to be placed on the trophy.

“There’s really three different parts of the process for my work. I’ll spend 3-4 days here, and then two weeks later, I’ll spend a couple more days, so it’s broken up. I guess if I stacked it all together, it’d be about 2-3 (full-time) weeks’ work of different types.”

After Thursday, seeing the finished product that will eventually be placed on the trophy, Power now has yet another bit of inspiration and motivation to win the Indy 500 again.

“You understand everything that goes into winning that race,” Power said. “(To be on the trophy) will be a lot of great satisfaction and gives you a lot of motivation because you want to go through this process again because it’s such a cool process.”

Here are some more tweets from Thursday’s session at Behrends’ studio for Power:

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