Dakar: Peterhansel closes in on Roma in Stage 9 (VIDEO)

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11-time Dakar Rally champion Stephane Peterhansel (pictured) became the all-time Dakar leader in stage wins with a victory today in Stage 9 from Calama to Iquique, Chile.

With the setting having shifted to the sands of Chile’s Atacama Desert, Peterhansel collected his 64th career win in the Dakar, surpassing Vladimir Chagin to claim the special record.

The Frenchman earned the Tuesday triumph by two minutes, 10 seconds over Nasser Al-Attiyah, and he also drew closer to overall car leader and third-place finisher Nani Roma.

With four stages remaining, the battle is far from decided as Roma’s lead over Peterhansel has shrunk again – this time, to 12 minutes, 10 seconds. And as the Dakar hits crunch time, Peterhansel is relishing his role as the hunter.

“For sure, I am in a good position because I have no pressure…I am not the leader,” he said. “Now I’m trying to drive as fast as possible. I’m taking real pleasure in it now, because I have nothing to lose.

“At the end, I’m second and it’s not my goal to finish second. So I will push and we will see what happens.”

Overall bike leader Marc Coma strengthened his grip on a potential title after a critical win today, while yesterday’s winner, Cyril Despres, followed up with a second place result.

“It was a complicated stage in the Atacama Desert,” said Coma, who now holds a overall lead of 55 minutes, 36 seconds over Joan Barreda.

“Very nice and very fast at the beginning, but on the last part we found some dunes. I tried to catch Joan, because he started two minutes in front of me. When I caught up with him I tried to follow to ride together to the end. It was a good day for me.”

As for Barreda, he initially finished second behind Coma today but drew a penalty that caused him to settle for ninth according to the Dakar website.

Quads leader Ignacio Casale nearly suffered disaster today on the road to Iquique. The Chilean racer was forced to stop multiple times to tend to a tire puncture.

But after putting on a spare, he was able to charge to a second-place finish behind stage winner Sebastian Husseini and also put more ground between himself and main rivals Sergio Lafuente and Rafal Sonik in the overall; Casale is now up 22 minutes, 39 seconds on Lafuente, while Sonik sits 46 minutes, 28 seconds behind.

“In the end, it’s a good stage, because I managed to claw the time back on my pursuers,” Casale said. “I was a bit scared, because there was a lot of time to make up and I had to push myself and the machine, but I’ve managed to get to Iquique after a positive stage, so I’m very happy.”

Andrey Karginov was finally able to put a dent in Gerard de Rooy’s overall lead in the truck category. Karginov earned his second consecutive win, taking away just over 19 minutes from the Dutchman in the process.

de Rooy still came away with a second, but after Stage 9, his lead over Karginov has fallen to 13 minutes, 28 seconds. He may remain atop the standings but the margin of error has noticeably slimmed.

What’s next for Danica Patrick after the Indy 500? Dreams, downtime and waffles

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INDIANAPOLIS – When Danica Patrick was a 14-year-old growing up in Roscoe, Illinois, she had a firm idea of what she’d be doing 20 years later.

A reporter from her hometown newspaper recently reminded her of that in a recent interview when he brought a prescient artifact from those teenage years – an essay that she crafted as an up and coming go-kart driver about her racing accomplishments.

“I’m breezing through it, and then at the end, it said, ‘I wanted to race Indy cars,” Patrick, 36, said Thursday at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. “I was 14. I told him, ‘See? If this isn’t an example of “Write that shit down,” nothing is.’

“This is manifesting. You have write it down and you have to imagine what you want. So I do that as much as I can.”

Heading into the final start of her career in Sunday’s Indianapolis 500 (she will start seventh in her No. 13 Dallara-Chevrolet for Ed Carpenter Racing), Patrick already seems to have a solid idea of the next 20 years — in part, because of having some glimpses into her post-racing life.

There has been plenty of downtime since her final NASCAR start in the Daytona 500 three months ago. She has taken vacations (including an India trip to meet the Dalai Lama with boyfriend Aaron Rodgers) and created several new routines on her suddenly free from racing weekends.

“I make waffles on Sundays now,” she said. “That’s pretty fun.  In the summer, there’s like farmers market.  I can’t wait for that.  I mean, there’s going to be probably some new stuff that I don’t know yet.

“The one thing that I am definitely looking forward to less of is less stress.  Last weekend was awesome at the end of it all because it went well with qualifying, but I was nervous for 95% of that weekend. That’s uncomfortable.”

But testing her comfort zone is appealing to Patrick, who has spent most of her adult life testing the boundaries of gender norms in her profession. Though the pressure of race weekends might disappear, her incessant quest for challenges probably will remain.

Now that racing is over, Patrick still has a winery, a clothing line, a cookbook and a fitness manual to promote – and more is on the way.

“I just have a habit for pushing myself to uncomfortable spaces, making them comfortable for me,” she said. “At least just making them comfortable enough to be able to manage.

“As an example, I went bungee jumping a long while back, like 10 years.  I’m super scared of heights.  I’m still scared of heights.  But I just like to know that if I want to do something, I am brave enough and confident enough to do it.  That doesn’t mean I’m not still scared.  That doesn’t mean it’s not still something that’s easy to me afterward. I just like to know I can get past the fear if I have to.

“I’m OK with transitioning into other things, finding a little bit of happiness and joy each day, less colorization of emotions. I’m ready for that.”

So what specifically is on tap? Talk shows? Another book?

Patrick demurs when pressed.

“I think I have definitely big dreams and aspirations for myself, for all my companies, for the kind of emotion I want to have on a day-to-day basis,” she said. “I’m looking forward to a good, easy, happy, calm, joyful, exciting, adventurous life.  If I say I want it, there’s a very good chance that’s what I’ll get.”

In the short-term, there’s hosting an ESPN awards show that will keep her busy through July.

And after that, her schedule will free up just as Green Bay Packers training camp begins for Rodgers, the two-time MVP quarterback.

“I’m thinking I’m going to have plenty of time to write a cookbook in Green Bay,” she said.