NASCAR announces new knockout qualifying format

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Taking a page from the playbooks of Formula One and the IndyCar Series, NASCAR will adopt a form of knockout-style qualifying across all three of its national series: Sprint Cup, Nationwide, and Camping World Truck.

NASCAR will use two or three-round sessions depending on the length of each track. Here are the main details:

FOR TRACKS LESS THAN 1.25 MILES LONG – TWO ROUNDS
Round 1: 30 minutes long for all cars; Top 12 drivers on single-lap speed advance.
10-minute Break
Round 2: 10 minutes long for the Top 12 from Round 1; sets positions 1-12.

FOR TRACKS 1.25 MILES LONG OR LARGER – THREE ROUNDS
Round 1: 25 minutes long for all cars; Top 24 drivers on single-lap speed advance.
5-minute Break
Round 2: 10 minutes long for Top 24 from Round 1; Top 12 drivers on single-lap speed advance; sets positions 13-24.
5-minute Break
Round 3: 5 minutes long for Top 12 from Round 2; sets positions 1-12.

With this new format, teams will have a single set of tires to use throughout qualifying and will only be allowed to adjust their cars during the breaks between the rounds.

Should a caution emerge during a qualifying round, that round will be red-flagged and the clock on that round will be stopped. If all qualifying rounds are not completed due to weather or other circumstances, the lineup will be set by the last official completed round; if no rounds are completed, the lineup will be set per the NASCAR rule book.

“We believe the timing is right for a new qualifying format across our three national series,” said Robin Pemberton, NASCAR vice president for competition and racing development in a statement. “This style of group qualifying has all the makings of being highly competitive and more engaging to our fans in the stands and those watching on television and online.

“For the drivers and teams, we believe this new qualifying will fuel even greater competition leading into the events. Additionally, it provides our tracks, broadcasters and other key partners with a greater opportunity to develop more entertaining content for our race weekends.”

There are some exceptions to note, however. The new format will not apply for the Daytona 500, non-points Sprint Cup races (such as the Sprint Unlimited and the Sprint All-Star Race), and the Trucks’ “Mudsummer Classic” event at Eldora Speedway.

The Daytona 500 and the Eldora truck race have unique qualifying formats. Daytona has single-car qualifying to set the front row, followed by a pair of 150-mile “Duels” to determine the rest of the grid.

Eldora also has single-car qualifying but uses that to set the field for a subsequent series of qualifying heat races. After those heats, a “last chance” qualifier and a Camping World Truck Series’ champion’s provisional completes the lineup.

More to follow…

F1: Lewis Hamilton roars back from starting 14th to win German GP, regain points lead

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Heading into Sunday’s German Grand Prix, Lewis Hamilton wasn’t given much of a chance after qualifying so poorly (14th) one day earlier.

But in one of the most significant rallies of the 2018 Formula One season, Hamilton roared back to not only win at Hockenheim, but also regain the lead in the F1 drivers championship standings at the halfway point of the season.

Ditto for Mercedes in the Constructors Championship.

“It was so tough out there,” Hamilton told Sky Sports/ESPN. “Conditions were perfect for business time. When it rained, I knew I’d have a good position, but you never know what’s going to happen behind the safety car.”

Despite rainy conditions for part of the race, not to mention wet overall conditions that caused a number of drivers to spin, Hamilton won the 66th race of his F1 career (44th with Mercedes AMG Petronas) in a time of 1:32.29.845 and took home 25 points for his fourth win of 2018.

It’s the furthest back a driver has come from back in the pack to win since Fernando Alonso started 15th and won the Singapore Grand Prix in 2008.

The win comes just a couple days after Hamilton re-signed with Mercedes AMG through the 2020 season, leading him to pay an immediate return on investment, so to speak.

“It’s obviously very, very difficult (to win) from that position and highly unlikely, but you’ve always got to believe,” Hamilton said. “I said a long, long prayer before the race started.

“When we did the parade lap, I could see how much support we had and I just wanted to stay collected and stay calm. The team did such a great job today, the car was fantastic, I’m so grateful.

“I would never have thought you could do something like that today, but I kept pushing and kept believing and it happened, so I really manifested my dreams today. Thanks to God.”

It was also the 125th F1 podium finish of Hamilton’s career.

To make the win even sweeter, Hamilton’s teammate, Valtteri Bottas, finished second, the first time in German GP history that homeland team Mercedes has finished 1-2.

It’s Bottas’ fifth podium of the season, all being runner-up finishes.

Kimi Raikkonen finished third, 6.5 seconds behind Hamilton, followed my Max Verstappen and Nico Hulkenberg. For Raikkonen, it was his 28th podium since his last win.

Sixth through 10th were Romain Grosjean, Sergio Perez, Esteban Ocon, Marcus Ericsson and Brendon Hartley.

Kevin Magnussen finished 11th, followed by Carlos Sainz, Stoffel Vandoorne, Pierre Gasly, Charles Leclerc and Fernando Alonso was the last running car, finishing 16th.

Failing to finish (17th through 20th) were Lance Stroll, pole sitter Sebastian Vettel (who made a mistake and crashed), Sergey Sirotkin and Daniel Ricciardo.

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