Breaking down the new changes to the Chase for the Sprint Cup

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CHARLOTTE, N.C. — In one of the biggest changes of his 11-year administration, NASCAR Chairman/CEO Brian France on Thursday announced a new format to the Chase for the Sprint Cup designed to further emphasize winning and enhance fan excitement – and potentially create a vibe that sells more tickets and increases TV ratings in the process.

The new format “is as simple as it gets,” France said during a roughly 20-minute presentation to the press on the final day of the NASCAR Media Tour at the Charlotte Convention Center.

“We have arrived at a format that makes every race matter even more, diminishes points racing, puts a premium on winning races and concludes with a best-of-the-best, first-to-the-finish-line showdown race – all of which is exactly what fans want,” France said. “The new Chase for the NASCAR Sprint Cup will be thrilling, easy to understand and help drive our sport’s competition to a whole new level.”

Here’s a breakdown on how the new format shakes out:

1) The Chase field will increase in size from 12 to 16 drivers. There will no longer be two wild card entries that make the Chase.

2) A win in the first 26 races all but guarantees a driver a berth in the 10-race Chase.

3) The top 15 drivers with the most wins over the first 26 races earn an automatic berth in what is being called the NASCAR Chase Grid – provided they leave Richmond, the 26th race, in the top 30 in points and have attempted to qualify for every race up to that point on the schedule.

4) If there are 16 or more different winners in the first 26 races, the only winless driver who can earn a berth would be the points leader after Richmond. For example, if Jeff Gordon goes through the first 26 races without a win but is the points leader after Richmond, he would be the only winless driver to qualify for the Chase.

5) If there are fewer than 16 race winners in the first 26 races, the 16-driver Chase field would be filled out with winless drivers with the most points following the first 26 races.

6) The points will be reset to 2,000 after the 16-driver Chase field is finalized following the September race at Richmond.

7) In perhaps the biggest key difference of the new format, the lowest-ranked four drivers (13th through 16th place) after the first three races will be eliminated from further advancement in the Chase, leaving 12 drivers. There will be a second round of elimination of the next-lowest four drivers (9th through 12th place) after the sixth race of the Chase, and a third round of elimination of the lowest four of the eight (5th through 8th place) remaining championship-eligible drivers after the ninth race. That sets up the biggest battle of the season, a four-driver winner-take-all race in the season finale at Homestead-Miami Speedway.

8) The first three races of the Chase will be known as the Challenger Round (races 27-29). The fourth through sixth races of the Chase will be known as the Contender Round (races 30-32). The seventh through ninth races of the Chase will be known as the Eliminator Round (races 33-35). The final race will be known simply as the NASCAR Sprint Cup Championship (race 36).

9) Any driver that wins a race in the first three Chase races (the Challenger Round) automatically advances to the next round. Likewise, a driver that wins a race in the second round (Contender Round) advances to the third round, and a third-round (Eliminator Round) race winner advances to the four-driver final round (Sprint Cup Championship).

10) If one of the final four drivers wins the season finale at Homestead, he/she is the champion. Otherwise, the highest-finishing driver in the race would then win the championship. One other note about the season-ending race: there will be NO bonus points for laps led. All four drivers will start the race tied in points, with the highest finisher being crowned champion.

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Who has the best odds of winning Sunday’s Indianapolis 500?

Can Takuma Sato make it 2 Indy 500 wins in a row Sunday? Photo: IndyCar
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Noted oddsmaker Bovada (www.Bovada.lv) has released its annual list of which drivers have the best — or worst — odds of winning Sunday’s 102nd Running of the Indianapolis 500 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Topping the list is 2016 Indy 500 winner Alexander Rossi at 8/1 odds, followed closely by Team Penske drivers Helio Castroneves (going for a record-tying fourth 500 triumph), 2017 Verizon IndyCar Series champ Josef Newgarden and Will Power, all at 10/1 odds.

Other notables include:

  • Pole sitter Ed Carpenter 12/1
  • Danica Patrick 25/1
  • Defending 500 winner Takuma Sato, who is vying to become the first back-to-back winner since Helio Castroneves did so in 2001 and 2002, 30/1
  • Rounding out the list with the highest odds of winning is Max Chilton at 25/1

Here’s the full list:

Indianapolis 500 – Odds to Win @ Indianapolis Motor Speedway

Alexander Rossi #27                  8/1

Helio Castroneves #3                 10/1

Josef Newgarden #1                  10/1

Will Power #12                          10/1

Sebastien Bourdais #18             12/1

Ed Carpenter #20                      12/1

Scott Dixon #9                          12/1

Ryan Hunter-Reay #28               12/1

Simon Pagenaud #22                12/1

Marco Andretti #98                    15/1

Tony Kanaan #14                       15/1

Sage Karam #24                        20/1

Carlos Munoz #29                      25/1

Danica Patrick #13                    25/1

Graham Rahal #15                     30/1

Takuma Sato #30                      30/1

Robert Wickens #6                    30/1

Gabby Chaves #88                    40/1

JR Hildebrand #66                     40/1

Ed Jones #10                            40/1

Charlie Kimball #23                    40/1

Spencer Pigot #21                     40/1

Zach Veach #26                        40/1

Stefan Wilson #25                     40/1

Zachary Claman De Melo #19     80/1

Jay Howard #7                          80/1

Matheus Leist #4                       80/1

Jack Harvery #60                       100/1

Oriol Servia #64                         100/1

Conor Daly #17                         150/1

James Davison #33                   200/1

Kyle Kaiser #32                         200/1

Max Chilton #59                        250/1