F1 2014 Primer: The Tracks

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The calendar for the 2014 Formula 1 season has undergone many drastic changes over the past six or seven months. At one point, we were staring down the barrel of a 22 race season, set to be the longest ever. Ultimately, the final figure was 19, as it has been in recent years, but there have been a few changes made from 2013.

THE NEW ADDITIONS

There are two races on the 2014 calendar that were not held in 2013. Firstly, the Austrian Grand Prix makes a return to Formula 1 after ten years away. Once again, it will be held at the old A1 Ring which fell into disrepair after being dropped from the F1 calendar. However, following serious investment by Red Bull (it is now known as the Red Bull Ring), it is once again a world class racing facility, and is a welcome return to the fray.

The only ‘brand new’ event on the calendar is the Russian Grand Prix, with a circuit being constructed as part of the Sochi Winter Olympics complex. Although this is the first Russian GP to be part of a world championship, it will actually be the third race to be run under the ‘Russian Grand Prix’ moniker. In 1913 and 1914, races were held in St. Petersburg before the outbreak of World War One. It is a new and exciting market, and with Russian youngster Daniil Kvyat on the grid, it should be a well-attended event.

THE DROPPED EVENTS

With two races joining the calendar, two have made way, both of which are short-lived events in Asia. The Korean Grand Prix was first held in 2010, but with plans for significant development at the circuit shelved, and the fact that it is a four hour train journey from Seoul, it has never really taken off. The only person who may miss it is Sebastian Vettel, having won three of the four grands prix held at Yeongam.

In contrast, the Indian Grand Prix will certainly be missed. The nation is booming economically and has a rich and vibrant culture, but financial complications have caused the race to be dropped for 2014. The official line is that the promoters want an early slot on the 2015 calendar, and cannot hold two races within six months of each other. Sadly, it’s unlikely that we will return to Buddh International Circuit next year – again, a favorite of Vettel’s, having won three from three there.

THE CHANGES

There have been a few minor changes to the order of the races in 2014. Firstly, the Bahrain Grand Prix and the Chinese Grand Prix have swapped places, with the event at Sakhir now going back-to-back with the Malaysian Grand Prix.

Further to that, the Bahrain Grand Prix will become a night race for 2014 to mark ten years since its first event. It will start at 6pm local time and run under floodlights (pictured), following in the footsteps of Singapore and Abu Dhabi.

Controversially, the Brazilian Grand Prix will no longer be the season finale, swapping places with the less-popular Abu Dhabi Grand Prix. However, with Interlagos having quite outdated facilities, it is thought that a more modern venue is wanted for the final round of the year. Once the expected upgrades are put in place in Brazil for 2015, it should return to being the final round of the season (although that will only slightly soften the blow of double points).

Finally, there are less back-to-back races in 2014 due to the return of in-season testing. Tests will be held following the races in Bahrain, Spain, Great Britain and Abu Dhabi.

2014 FIA FORMULA 1 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP CALENDAR

1. Australian Grand Prix 16th March 2014 – Albert Park
2. Malaysian Grand Prix 30th March 2014 – Sepang International Circuit
3. Bahrain Grand Prix 6th April 2014 – Bahrain International Circuit
4. Chinese Grand Prix 20th April 2014 – Shanghai International Circuit
5. Spanish Grand Prix 11th May 2014 – Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya
6. Monaco Grand Prix 25th May 2014 – Circuit de Monaco
7. Canadian Grand Prix 8th June 2014 – Circuit Gilles Villeneuve
8. Austrian Grand Prix 22nd June 2014 – Red Bull Ring
9. British Grand Prix 6th July 2014 – Silverstone Circuit
10. German Grand Prix 20th July 2014 – Hockenheimring
11. Hungarian Grand Prix 27th July 2014 – Hungaroring
12. Belgian Grand Prix 24th August 2014 – Circuit de Spa Francorchamps
13. Italian Grand Prix 7th September 2014 – Autodromo Nazionale Monza
14. Singapore Grand Prix 21st September 2014 – Marina Bay Street Circuit
15. Japanese Grand Prix 5th October 2014 – Suzuka Circuit
16. Russian Grand Prix 12th October 2014 – Sochi International Street Circuit
17. United States Grand Prix 2nd November 2014 – Circuit of the Americas
18. Brazilian Grand Prix 9th November 2014 – Autodromo Jose Carlos Pace
19. Abu Dhabi Grand Prix 23rd November 2014 – Yas Marina Circuit

X44 Racing win 2022 Extreme E championship as Abt Cupra score first race victory

2022 Extreme E Uruguay
Extreme E
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Abt Cupra Racing’s Nasser Al-Attiyah and Klara Andersson scored their first win in the Extreme E Energy X Prix in the 2022 finale in Uruguay as Lewis Hamilton’s X44 Vida Carbon Racing drivers Sebastien Loeb and Cristina Gutierrez survived a chaotic finale to edge the 2021 champion Rosberg X Prix team of Johan Kristoffersson and Mikhaela Ahlin-Kottulinsky, by two points.

“There are so many emotions,” Andersson said in Extreme E’s coverage. “I’ve been waiting for this for so long. In my second race, first full weekend to be at the top of the podium: it’s big.”

Andersson was behind the wheel at the finish.

Rosberg Racing entered the event with a 17-point advantage over X44, but the standings were close enough that four teams remained in contention in Round 5.

“It’s a crucial weekend for us,” Loeb said in Extreme E’s coverage prior to the race. “We are not in the best position to win the championship, but the only thing we can do is try to win the race and score as many points as possible.”

The top two title contenders each crashed in qualification and were relegated to the Crazy Race, Extreme E’s version of the Last Chance Qualifier (LCQ). For the moment, they had the steepest hill to climb, but then the other two championship contending teams, Chip Ganassi Racing and Acciona Sainz Racing failed to advance from their heats.

Only one team advances from the Crazy Race, so the X44 drivers were in a must-win situation to simply keep hope alive.

More: Extreme E 2023 schedule

Ahlin-Kottulinsky and Gutierrez ran wheel to wheel into the first turn at the start of the LCQ.

The Rosberg racer experienced crash damage in that turn that damaged her front steering, but managed to limp back to the pits at the end of her two-lap stint. The team attempted to fix the steering, but incurred a penalty for having too many mechanics in the pit area.

Meanwhile, Gutierrez took the early lead, but knew she would need to sit through a five-second penalty for an incident earlier in the weekend. The female half of the gender equal pair erased the penalty by entering the Switch Zone with a five-second lead before turning the car over to Loeb.

That was all the nine-time World Rally Championship titlist needed to give him the advantage needed to win the Crazy Race.

But the championship was not over yet. X44 Racing needed to finish third or better in the five-car finale to earn enough points for the title and after advancing from the LCQ, they were forced to take the worst grid position.

A chaotic start to the Finale saw Loeb run as high the lead and low as fourth after getting pushed off course during his first lap. And that is how he entered to Switch Zone.

On her first lap, Gutierrez slammed into Molly Taylor. With one lap remaining, X44 and Gutierrez were still in fourth and the title hope was quickly evaporating, but it was announced halfway through the lap that the third-running Andretti United team would suffer a penalty for a Switch Zone infraction. The seven-second deduction for Timmy Hansen braking too late in the zone made the difference in the title.

Coming off a disappointing Copper X Prix when Tanner Foust and Emma Gilmour crossed under the checkers first, but were relegated to fifth by penalty, the McLaren pair scored their first podium of the season in second.