Keselowski reflects on past days of driving for Dale Jr.

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We have a new blogger in the NASCAR ranks, and it’s none other than 2012 Sprint Cup champion Brad Keselowski.

The outspoken Team Penske driver has already shown to be quite adept with social media, but now he’s turned his sights on blogging at his official web site.

His first post is a neat one, a reflection on his past days as a driver for Dale Earnhardt Jr. and his Nationwide Series team.

Prior to joining JR Motorsports mid-way during the 2007 season, Keselowski had been battling to maintain his place in the sport. He had moved into the Nationwide Series that year but the small team he was driving for went bankrupt.

But in June of that year, everything aligned for him. He suited up for Germain Racing in a Camping World Truck Series event to replace a suspended driver.

As it turned out, Dale Jr. – who had met Keselowski earlier that year and recently released his previous Nationwide driver – was watching. We’ll let Brad explain the rest:

The night I ran the truck race for the suspended driver, it went well. I had qualified us on the pole. I was running really well and was winning the race until I was wrecked from behind late. As Dale later told it to me, he was actually watching the race on TV. He needed a driver for his car, he saw me, and he thought, “This is easy. Let’s put him in.”

He called me up the next day when I was flying back to Michigan. “I’d like you to drive my car,” he said. “Come on down here and check it out.”

So I did.

And the rest was history. Keselowski would remain with JRM through the 2009 season before moving up to Sprint Cup full-time – and also winning the Nationwide title – in 2010 with Team Penske.

Two years later, he’d bring Roger Penske his first Cup championship.

We suggest you click the link above for the full story – and then bookmark Keselowski’s blog for future tales. Surely, he’s got more good ones to tell.

March 29 in Motorsports History: Scott Dixon wins first race after reunification

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Reunited and it felt so good.

That’s what drivers likely thought before the 2008 IndyCar opener at Homestead-Miami Speedway.

For the first time since 1995, major-league open-wheel racing in the United States was under the banner of a sole sanctioning body as Champ Car and the Indy Racing Leauge had reunified just a month prior.

Scott Dixon celebrates after winning the 2008 IndyCar opener at Homestead. Photo: Jim Hines/IndyCar.

The first race after reunification also saw a reversal of fortunes for Scott Dixon, who won the race after losing the 2007 IRL championship in crushing fashion.

In the 2007 season finale at Chicagoland Speedway, Dixon ran out of fuel while leading on the final lap of the race. The race victory – and championship – went to Dixon’s future teammate, Dario Franchitti.

But the tides turned for Dixon nearly seven months later, and the Kiwi was able to win with the help of another driver’s misfortune.

Tony Kanaan was leading with seven laps remaining when E.J. Viso spun and made contact with Kanaan’s car. Kanaan remained on track through the caution period despite suffering obvious damage to his right front suspension.

On the final restart with three laps remaining, Dixon and others cars easily passed Kanaan’s wounded car on the outside. Dixon then maintained his lead through the checkered flag to win at Homestead for the second time in his career.

“I think Marco (Andretti) and T.K. probably had a little bit better cars today, but we came through with the win, and that’s what counts,” Dixon told ESPN after his 12th career victory.

Following his victory at Homestead, Dixon continued to redeem himself through the course of the 2008 season. In May, he won the Indianapolis 500 for the first (and so far only) time. Following Indy, he went on to win four more times in 2008 and won his second series championship.

Also on this date:

1998: Mika Hakkinen won the Grand Prix of Brazil, the first of eight victories in his first championship season.

2010: Will Power won the Honda Grand Prix of St. Petersburg, which was held on a Monday morning because of rain postponing the race on Sunday.

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