Matt Kenseth, Jimmie Johnson, others ready for competition caution on Lap 50 at Bristol

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Now that the rain has stopped and we’re getting closer to drop of the the green flag for Sunday’s Food City 500, fans might wonder why NASCAR has called for a competition caution to be thrown at Lap 50.

The caution will be to primarily check tire wear on a track that will start under completely green conditions due to rain washing away all the rubber that was built up on the track Friday and Saturday in practice, qualifying and the Nationwide Series race.

At other tracks, most competition cautions fall typically between the 20-lap and 30-lap range.

So why wait until 50 laps at Bristol Motor Speedway?

A couple of reasons:

1. 50 laps at Bristol translates only into 26.65 miles in an event that is 266.50 miles in length. In other words, the competition caution will come just one-tenth of the way through the race.

2. If adjustments need to be made to cars, the competition caution is the perfect time to do so. Overall race strategy is also reevaluated, particularly with the green track at the start of the event.

NASCAR officials still remember what happened on a completely green race track during Friday’s Sprint Cup practice, when a number of drivers including Danica Patrick, Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Greg Biffle and Saturday’s Nationwide Series winner Kyle Busch all lost control and bounced off each other or had solo wrecks into the wall.

“The track’s going to be a challenge, it’s pretty green, tires are going to wear aggressively, the top groove is going to come in — who knows what we’ve got,” said Marcos Ambrose.

Pit stops under green flag racing planned before the race will potentially be juggled, if not some eliminated from teams’ initial strategy coming into the race with expectations that additional caution flags will fall due to wrecks or debris on the track.

“Hopefully, it’ll be okay,” Matt Kenseth said before the race. “It’ll be good once the track rubbers up and I think things are going to change a lot 75 or 100 laps in.

“You just have to pay a lot of attention to when it rubbers in … and keep searching around and keep trying to find that grip because it’s definitely going to change throughout the race.”

Bristol Motor Speedway has been particularly difficult to several drivers, including Tony Stewart, who counts Bristol as his second-worst performing track in his career.

Even six-time and defending Sprint Cup champion Jimmie Johnson has had difficulty at the half-mile bullring, with just one Sprint Cup career victory to date there.

“We all assume it’s going to be pretty loose at the start,” Johnson said. “Once we get 100 laps or so in, we’ll start to work on what the car really needs to set up for a race win.

“I just hope to survive here. You can be leading and have weird things happen. I have the survival mindset, and if we’re there at that last pit stop and know we have a car fast enough to win, but we’ve got to get there first.”

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Zach Veach splits with Andretti Autosport for rest of IndyCar season

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Zach Veach will be leaving his Andretti Autosport ride with three races remaining in the season, choosing to explore options after the decision was made he wouldn’t return for 2021.

In a Wednesday release, Andretti Autosport said a replacement driver for the No. 26 Dallara-Honda would be named in the coming days. The NTT IndyCar Series will race Oct. 2-3 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway road course and then conclude the season Oct. 25 on the streets of St. Petersburg, Florida.

Veach was ranked 11th in the points standings through 11 races of his third season with Andretti. Since a fourth in the June 6 season opener at Texas Motor Speedway, he hadn’t finished higher than 14th.

“The decision was made that I will not be returning in 2021 with Andretti Autosport in the No. 26 Gainbridge car,” Veach said in the Andretti release. “This, along with knowing that limited testing exists for teams due to COVID, have led me to the decision to step out of the car for the remainder of the 2020 IndyCar season. I am doing this to allow the team to have time with other drivers as they prepare for 2021, and so that I can also explore my own 2021 options.

“This is the hardest decision I have ever made, but to me, racing is about family, and it is my belief that you take care of your family. Andretti Autosport is my family and I feel this is what is best to help us all reach the next step. I will forever be grateful to Michael and the team for all of their support over the years. I would not be where I am today if it wasn’t for a relationship that started many years ago with Road to Indy. I will also be forever grateful to Dan Towriss for his friendship and for the opportunity he and Gainbridge have given me.

“My love for this sport and the people involved is unmeasurable, and I look forward to continuing to be amongst the racing world and fans in 2021.”

Said team owner Michael Andretti: “We first welcomed Zach to the Andretti team back in his USF2000 days and have enjoyed watching him grow and evolve as a racer, and a person. His decision to allow us to use the last few races to explore our 2021 options shows the measure of his character.

“Zach has always placed team and family first, and we’re very happy to have had him as part of ours for so many years. We wish him the best in whatever 2021 may bring and will always consider him a friend.”

Andretti fields five full-time cars for Veach, Alexander Rossi, Ryan Hunter-Reay, Marco Andretti and Colton Herta.

It also has fielded James Hinchcliffe in three races this season.