Sebring 12-hour: Selected quote roundup

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Here’s a selection of post-race driver and team quotes from the second round of the 2014 TUDOR United SportsCar Championship, the Mobil 1 Twelve Hours of Sebring:

  • “It was incredible. We couldn’t believe we were in position to win. It’s certainly the biggest day in my career. We were lucky the way the traffic and the restart went. With about an hour to go I didn’t think it was going to work out. The car was a real handful but we finally found the sweet spot right at the end and the whole team and my team-mates did a great job,” –Marino Franchitti, No. 01 Chip Ganassi Racing Ford EcoBoost Riley, overall and P class winners.
  •  “The part of the race that is hard to swallow is the mistaken penalty to Cooper (MacNeil) eight hours into the event. That mistake by the officials cost us any chance at winning the race. It was too bad because the car and the drivers never missed a beat all day. The car didn’t have a scratch on it. We just deserved more. Disappointing,” –Alex Job, team principal, Nos. 22/23 Alex Job Racing Porsche 911 GT Americas in GTD.
  • “The No. 2 car had a great day and unfortunately had a little bit of contact and they would have been right there shooting it out for the win. David (Brabham) and Ryan (Dalziel) raced the No. 1 car to the front and did an incredible job.
 We just were very unfortunate with the yellow.  If the Ganassi No. 01 car was two-thirds of a lap down and or the yellow never came, they wouldn’t have been able to gain the ground and catch us, so we would have won,” –Scott Sharp, No. 1 Extreme Speed Motorsports HPD ARX-03b, finished second in P.
  • “This was the hardest race I have ever done. We had no grip on the track during the day and we suffered a lack of power compared to DPs and HPDs,” –Gustavo Yacaman, No. 42 OAK Racing Morgan Nissan, finished fourth in P.
  • “The car felt quite lively and very quick in my first stint. It was nice that when I came out from my pit stop, we were able to run a very similar pace to the other prototypes. We had a bit of a brake issue in the first stint, but once I had the opportunity to cool them down during the long yellow, it was fine. But once again, the DeltaWing proved to be a fantastic car in traffic – it was a good stint and it was good to lead a race again,” –Andy Meyrick, No. 0 DeltaWing DWC13 coupe, first hour race leader.
  •  “I was just telling myself ‘don’t mess it up’ those last laps. Patrick (Long) always says I am good at night and I am just happy that it did work out,” –Jorg Bergmeister, No. 912 Porsche North America Porsche 911 RSR, won GTLM.
  • “It’s still very surreal to be here. Having so many challenges throughout the race made for a very exciting 12 hours, and I’m still in a bit of shock that we came away with a victory,” –John Potter, No. 44 Magnus Racing Porsche 911 GT America, won GTD.
  • “For a program that was pulled together at the last second, to come out of here with a second was more than we could have hoped for, so I’m very pleased. Starting the year with podiums at Daytona and Sebring is not too bad!” –Townsend Bell, No. 555 AIM Autosport Ferrari 458 Italia GT3, finished second in GTD.
  • “We had the drive shaft yoke break at the rear axle. The shaft stayed connected to the transmission and what I felt was it banging around in the driveshaft tunnel, which was all beat up. My power had gone, no drive, and I bet it knocked off a fuel line, I was sitting there trying to start it, feeding, fueling the fire, no pun intended,” –Ben Keating, No. 33 ViperExchange.com SRT Viper GT3-R, GTD, car burned to the ground in the first hour.
  • “The performance of the SRT Motorsports car was flawless, absolutely flawless all day. I just couldn’t believe how close the race was. For almost 12 hours there was less than 20 seconds separating the top-three. It was probably the most exciting race I’ve seen yet,” –Ralph Gilles, SRT President & CEO; Nos. 93 and 91 finished second and seventh in GTLM.
  • “My second stint was really fun. My back-and-forth with the No. 09 got a little bit closer than I wanted it to. I kind of got caught up on the restart there when the whole pack of DP cars came by. But I managed to recover from that and retake the lead,” –James Gue, No. 54 CORE autosport ORECA FLM09, won PC, had great lead battle with David Heinemeier Hansson for class lead.
  • “That was probably the most fun I’ve had in a stint in a long time. The car is excellent. I had a phenomenal battle with the CORE car,” –David Heinemeier Hansson, No. 09 RSR Racing ORECA FLM09, finished second in PC.
  • “The team actually did an incredible job when repairing the car because we only lost about 18 laps, which is pretty good considering the damage we sustained. We had setup issues beforehand and found that they had been cured after the crash, so I don’t know whether we had some mechanical problems beforehand or whether the track just came to us,” –Tom Kimber-Smith, No. 25 8Star Motorsports ORECA FLM09, finished fifth in PC.
  • “I got a little wide and then got into the marbles that sent me right in to the wall. I’m OK, the car not so much. I know the guys will get on it, I know they will. It’s just about putting this one behind us and looking ahead to the next one,” –David Ostella, No. 38 Performance Tech Motorsports ORECA FLM09, PC (accident in fourth hour)

Helio Castroneves: ‘I have nothing to lose’ Sunday in bid for 4th Indy 500 win

All photos: IndyCar
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You might say Helio Castroneves comes into Sunday’s 102nd Running of the Indianapolis 500 with a “less is more” philosophy than he’s had in years past:

* No pressure

* No worrying about points

* No worrying about winning a championship

Take away all those things and the very popular Brazilian driver could be in the best position he’s ever been to achieve the biggest goal of his career:

Winning a fourth Indy 500, making him a member of motor racing’s most exclusive club, joining legendary drivers A.J. Foyt, Al Unser and Rick Mears as the only drivers to conquer the legendary Indianapolis Motor Speedway four times each.

Like his car number, Castroneves has won the Indy 500 three times. He wants to change that number to four times in Sunday’s 102nd Running of the Greatest Spectacle In Racing. Photo: IndyCar.

“For sure, I definitely don’t have much to lose in terms of points, championships, and things like that,” Castroneves told MotorSportsTalk earlier this week. “I don’t have to think that I don’t have a car to win, I’m not going to risk that much because there are still championship points (to earn if he was still racing full-time in the series).

“Not that I did that before, but if the situation occurs, people just need to know I have nothing to lose this time.”

Castroneves three prior triumphs in the 500 came in his first two years in the field – 2001 and 2002 – and again in 2009. In addition, he has finished twice in the last four editions of the Greatest Spectacle In Racing in 2014 and 2017.

Coming so close last year, losing to Takuma Sato by .201 of a second, is something Castroneves hasn’t forgotten about. To come so close to No. 4 has only made him more hungry to get it done on Sunday.

“Yeah, but if it were easy, we would likely have had more than four wins by now,” he said. “We’ve had opportunities in the past, the last four years we were really competitive, we were right there, especially in ’14 and ’17, we were right on it.

“Last year, I thought it was going to be the hardest 500 for me and look what happened: we were battling to the end for a victory,” Castroneves said. “It’s not just about trying hard, it’s about being there at the right place at the right time.

“And this place, Indianapolis, I’ve always said the track winds up choosing who is going to be the winner. Hopefully, with safety and luck, we’ll be part of it and be on the right side.”

Team owner Roger Penske decided after last season to put Castroneves and Juan Pablo Montoya as the chief drivers of Team Penske’s new two-car effort in the IMSA WeatherTech Championship sports car series.

When the announcement was first made, many feared that Castroneves had run out of chances to get that elusive No. 4 at Indy.

But Penske sweetened the deal for Helio to go sports car racing by promising he’d field a car for him at Indy. And Penske has proven to be a man of his word, giving Castroneves everything he needs to finally win No. 4.

“I feel we’ve prepared as much as a team, we’re doing everything possible in relation to preparation,” Castroneves said. “The preparation we had in the previous year helps us tremendously to give us an opportunity fighting there for a win, and that’s what we’re looking for.”

Castroneves has taken to the new style Indy car with aplomb. During the first week of practice leading up to last weekend’s qualifying, he was consistently one of the fastest drivers in the field.

The 43-year-old even topped the speed charts in the Fast Nine last Saturday before ending up eighth in the following day’s pole qualifying.

As a result, he’ll start Sunday’s race from the middle of Row 3, anchoring Team Penske’s four-man Top 8 starting lineup effort in the 500. When the green flag drops, to his left will be Danica Patrick and to his right will be four-time IndyCar champ and former 500 winner Scott Dixon.

And millions of others right behind him, so to speak.

“I feel the sense that everyone wants it to happen,” he said of winning No. 4. “We’re talking about being part of history here. The last guy to do it was Rick Mears in the ‘90s (1991).

“I mean, how cool would that be if I would be in the position and to see No. 4 in my era. I hear a lot of the fans, even those supporting different drivers, all saying ‘Man, I want to see you win No. 4.’ That just shows how special this place is.

“(The Indy 500) is part of a lot of people’s lives. I just would be very fortunate to hopefully to have this generation see someone do No. 4.”

While he’d rather not think about missing out on a fourth win at Indy for a ninth straight year, Castroneves is using reverse psychology somewhat.

He’s going into Sunday’s biggest race in the world fully believing he will finally win No. 4.

And if he does, forget the idea that he would never come back to race at Indy again.

“Not at all. Why? You’re so close to getting four, and then when you get four, you stop it? It doesn’t make sense.

“I think I still have at least four or five more years, there’s no question about it. As long as Roger (Penske) gives me the opportunity, I’m going to be going for it, for sure.”

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