Twice victimized himself, Brian Vickers to drive car in Sunday’s Sprint Cup race to raise awareness of blood clots

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Sprint Cup driver Brian Vickers has twice had to overcome potentially life-threatening blood clots.

To raise awareness about the disease, as well as  March being Blood Clot Awareness Month, Vickers will drive a specially marked No. 55 TreatMyClot.com/Aaron’s Toyota in Sunday’s 400-mile Cup race at Auto Club Speedway, located about an hour east of Los Angeles.

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, which is sponsoring Vickers’ car, is also sponsoring Saturday’s TreatMyClot.com 300 Nationwide Series race, also at Fontana.

“I want people to be mindful of what the signs and symptoms are,” Vickers said in a statement. “Visit http://www.TreatMyClot.com to learn about the warning signs and if you experience any of the signs or symptoms talk to your doctor. That’s the best thing to do.

“I’m always mindful and take precautions. When you’re taking long flights, you stand up and you walk around. That’s not just for me, everyone should do that.”

Vickers’ first bout with severe blood clots occurred in 2010 in both his lungs and legs while driving for Red Bull Racing. He was hospitalized for several weeks and wound up competing in just 11 of that season’s 36 races.

He came back for a full slate of races in 2011, only to have the Red Bull team fold following that season. He drove just eight times in 2012 (due to sponsorship issues), but came back in 2013 to make 17 starts – 15 for MWR and three weeks in place of the injured Denny Hamlin.

Unfortunately, after last fall’s race at Charlotte – and three months after his third career Sprint Cup win, at New Hampshire – Vickers once again was sidelined with a blood clot in his right calf, forcing him to miss the final four races of the season.

“Obviously, I keep an eye out for signs and symptoms, but my last incident was a provoked incident,” Vickers said. “I had to wear an ankle brace for a month, which is known to create clots. In those situations in the future, I will be more mindful and probably more careful and maybe try to get ahead of it. Other than that I just live my life and go racing.”

Fortunately, he’s back racing full-time in 2014. He currently sits 17th in the Sprint Cup standings and is coming off strong finishes of 13th at Las Vegas and a season-best thus far finish of ninth this past Sunday at Bristol.

“I’m totally focused on winning now, but I’ve also teamed up with Janssen to share the risks for deep vein thrombosis and get the word out about the risk of clots,” Vickers said. “I’m telling everyone to go to www.TreatMyClot.com to learn more about blood clots and information that can help everyone.

“You know, I’ve been fortunate over the last few years to have doctors, friends, family and medicine to help me overcome this. This is just a way to give back and help others.”

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Danica says goodbye: ‘Definitely not a great ending’ but ‘I’m for sure grateful’

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INDIANAPOLIS – Danica Patrick’s final racing news conference didn’t go quite as planned, but at least she didn’t lose her sense of humor about it.

“Is that like the Oscars when they close the show out?” Patrick joked when her opening address was drowned out by the midrace broadcast of Sunday’s Indianapolis 500 in the media center. “Take my mic away. I’ll leave. I promise. I don’t really want to be here because I’m pretty sad, but all right. I guess I’ll stop there.”

That was about as lighthearted as it got, though, for the most accomplished female driver in racing history after the final start of her career. That naturally made for some reflection, too.

“I will say that I’m for sure very grateful for everybody,” she said. “It still was a lot of great moments this month. A lot of great moments this year.”

Patrick was the first woman to lead both the Indianapolis 500 (in her 2005 debut) and the Daytona 500 (in 2013 when she also was the first female to qualify on pole position in NACAR history).

But she couldn’t bookend that with similarly memorable finishes. After crashing out of her final two Cup races in the November 2017 season finale at Homestead-Miami Speedway and the 2018 Daytona 500, Indy concluded the same way.

“Definitely not a great ending,” she said. “But I kind of said before I came here that it could be a complete disaster, as in not in the ballpark at all. And look silly, then people may remember that. And if I win, people will remember that.

“Probably anything in between might just be a little part of the big story. So I kind of feel like that’s how it is. I’m appreciative for all the fans, for GoDaddy, for Ed Carpenter Racing, for IndyCar. Today was a tough day. A little bit of it was OK. A lot of it was just a typical drive.”

Beforehand, Patrick seemed relaxed while smiling and laughing outside her car with a tight circle of close friends and family that included her parents and boyfriend Aaron Rodgers, the Green Bay Packers quarterback.

“For sure, I was definitely nervous,” she said about her first Indy 500 start in seven years. “I found myself most of the time on the grid being confused what part of prerace we were in. I was like, ‘I remember this,’ and ‘Where are the Taps?’ and ‘When is the anthem?’ but I had all my people around me, so I was in good spirits.”

And with that, she bid adieu.

“Thank you guys,” she said. “Thank you for everything. I’ll miss you. Most of the time. Maybe you’ll miss me just a little. Thanks, guys.”