Darrell ‘Bubba’ Wallace Jr. picks up where he left off at Martinsville, fastest in Friday morning Trucks practice

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It appears Darrell “Bubba” Wallace Jr. is ready to pick up from where he left off at the last time he raced at Martinsville Speedway.

Wallace became the first African-American driver to win a national event in nearly 50 years when he won at Martinsville last October.

He obviously learned his lessons well there, as he was the fastest in practice Friday morning at the .526-mile, paper-clip shaped track.

In a lengthy practice that lasted nearly three hours (9 am to 11:45 am ET), Wallace was the fastest of the 37 drivers that took practice laps.

And he waited until the final of the 95 laps he ran to do it, covering the track at 96.662 mph.

Ryan Blaney was second-fastest at 96.288 mph, followed by Timothy Peters, Erik Jones and Ben Kennedy in the top-five.

Sixth through 10th were Brian Ickler, German Quiroga Jr., Ron Hornaday Jr., Cole Custer and Matt Crafton.

Nine drivers logged over 100 laps, led by Tyler Reddick (130), John West Townley (118), John Hunter Nemecheck (114), Joey Coulter (113), Korbin Forrister (108), and Marcus Mingus, Ben Rhodes and Tyler Young (all three ran 105 laps), and Erik Jones (103).

Only three drivers failed to exceed 90 mph: Ted Minor (88.718), Norm Benning (who ran just four laps and had a best speed of 88.062) and the slowest driver in the field, Jennifer Jo Cobb (87.594).

The trucks will be back on the track later this afternoon from 3 pm to 4:25 pm ET, just before the start of Sprint Cup qualifying.

Here’s the whole speed chart for the tracks from Friday morning’s practice:

1 Darrell Wallace Jr. 96.662 mph

2 Ryan Blaney 96.228

3 Timothy Peters 96.239

4 Erik Jones 96.220

5 Ben Kennedy 96.146

6 Brian Ickler 96.034

7 German Quiroga Jr. 95.990

8 Ron Hornaday Jr. 95.946

9 Cole Custer 95.762

10 Matt Crafton 95.728

11 Gray Gaulding 95.636

12 Ben Rhodes 95.405

13 Ross Chastain 95.376

14 Johnny Sauter 95.103

15 Chase Pistone 95.094

16 John Wes Townley 95.055

17 Tyler Reddick 94.851

18 Joey Coulter 94.836

19 Mason Mingus 94.623

20 John Hunter Nemecheck 94.581

21 Brandon Jones 94.567

22 Jeb Burton 94.496

23 Tyler Young 94.336

24 Spencer Gallagher 94.087

25 Caleb Holman 94.003

26 Alex Guenette 93.985

27 Clay Greenfield 93.919

28 Ray Black Jr. 93.437

29 Bryan Silas 93.249

30 Raymond Terczak Jr. 92.719

31 Justin Jennings 92.106

32 Travis Kvapil 91.918

33 Josh Williams 91.842

34 Korbin Forrister 90.977

35 Ted Minor 88.718

36 Norm Benning 88.062

37 Jennifer Jo Cobb 87.594

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F1 aggressive on COVID-19 testing, social distancing enforcement

F1 COVID-19 testing
Mario Renzi - Formula 1/Formula 1 via Getty Images
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With big hugs and wide smiles, McLaren Racing CEO Zak Brown exuberantly celebrated the first podium finish of Lando Norris’ Formula One career. His exuberance earned a warning from Formula One and FIA officials during the era of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and subsequent F1 testing.

“Obviously I got excited with Lando on the podium and embraced him after the race,” Brown said with a laugh during a news conference Friday. “You get caught up in the emotion and excitement of the event, but it was suggested maybe I don’t do that again if we get a podium anytime soon.”

MASK WARNING: NASCAR tells teams to avoid ‘complacency’

Now in its second race weekend of 2020, F1 has taken an aggressive approach to maintain a paddock free of COVID-19. Before teams hit the track last week for the season-opening Austrian Grand Prix, F1 and FIA officials said more than 4,000 tests were conducted over a week with no positive tests.

In order to enter the track, any F1 personnel (which includes drivers and team members) must have a negative COVID-19 test. Private testing was used ahead of those traveling to Austria. After entering the track, personnel are tested every five days with private medical teams at events along with extra screening.

The results of F1 COVID-19 testing also will be made public every seven days. More than 8,000 tests were conducted through Saturday.

It’s a much different tack from NASCAR and IndyCar, neither of which is conducting COVID-19 testing (and with NASCAR recently distributing that warned teams of “complacency with protocols).

Though Brown, who also oversees Arrow McLaren SP Motorsports in IndyCar, demurred when asked whether the U.S.-based series should be taking a cue, he praised F1 COVID-19 testing for being a best-in-class example.

“I don’t know exactly what every other racing series is doing, so it would be difficult for me to say they’re doing it right or wrong,” Brown said from Austria. “All I can really do is speak to what Formula One is doing, and they’re doing an unbelievable job with 5,000 tests, and people flying in from different parts of the world. The minute that someone — and there’s not been many instances – has taken a mask off, you’re getting a letter or a phone call saying put your mask back on.

“I think all sports should be looking at all sports and seeing who’s doing what and what are our best practices, but I’ve got nothing but great things to say about how the FIA and Formula One and the countries they’re racing in are executing because it feels extremely safe here.”

Brown said it’s unlikely the European-based circuit will do F1 COVID-19 testing at races in the United States, Brazil, Mexico and Canada because the events likely will be scrubbed. Circuit of The Americas in Austin, Texas, was scheduled to play host to F1 on the Oct. 23-25 race weekend but just canceled its MotoGP race.

“We’d very much like to race at all those circuits,” Brown said. “Unfortunately, my opinion is it’s probably unlikely we’ll race at any of those venues this year. That’s obviously due to the COVID situation. … Let’s see what happens, but certainly it seems like the spikes in Texas are pretty severe and Brazil and Mexico and Canada a little less so. But if we miss them this year, we certainly look forward to going back to those venues next year.”