IndyCar: Possible Long Beach stunners and spoilers

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Picking a Long Beach winner is no easy task – it’s provided several drivers their first IndyCar victory and there’s a good seven or eight to choose from this week if you’re looking for a contender. And even after that there’s another five or six who could play spoilers. Here’s a field breakdown:

PAST LONG BEACH WINNERS (7)

The seven past Long Beach winners are Sebastien Bourdais, who’s won here three times from 2005 through ’07, two-time winner Will Power (2008, ’12), and single-race winners Juan Pablo Montoya (1999), Helio Castroneves (2001), Ryan Hunter-Reay (2010), Mike Conway (2011) and Takuma Sato (2013).

Power and Hunter-Reay are the only two drivers in the field to qualify in the Firestone Fast Six both years at Long Beach since the Dallara DW12’s introduction in 2012, and RHR hasn’t qualified worse than third at Long Beach since 2009. On past performance they’re likely to be the pace setters.

Power’s Penske teammates Castroneves and Montoya aren’t as likely to be pole threats, but at least one of the two should make the Firestone Fast Six.

St. Petersburg polesitter and defending Long Beach winner Sato has a shot at his third straight pole position in a street course qualifying session, after also winning the pole for Houston Race 1 last year (Race 2 qualifying was canceled due to inclement weather, with the grid set by entrant points).

Bourdais and Conway are each in the situation where they’re gelling with new teams in just their second race apiece at KVSH and Ed Carpenter Racing.

Qualifying is important, but not imperative at Long Beach. Power won from 12th after a 10-spot grid penalty and a fuel-saving masterpiece two years ago and Sato from fourth last year. It’s still better to be in the top three, though.

THE SAFE SPOILERS (6)

Any of Ryan Briscoe, Simon Pagenaud, James Hinchcliffe, Tony Kanaan, Justin Wilson or Graham Rahal would be your next best bets.

Briscoe is a former Long Beach polesitter; Pagenaud and Hinchcliffe have past Long Beach wins in other categories (ALMS and Indy Lights, respectively) and Kanaan has the polesitting car from Long Beach last year, Dario Franchitti’s No. 10 Target car.

Wilson and Rahal were the two additional podium finishers in 2013 and while both work with new engineers this year, a repeat result is not impossible.

Although none has won yet at Long Beach, all six have past Long Beach podium finishes in IndyCar and seek that top step of the podium.

LONGER SHOTS BASED ON HISTORY OR THEIR SITUATION (10) 

While Briscoe and Kanaan have had some Long Beach success, Ganassi teammates Scott Dixon and Charlie Kimball haven’t. This has been a frequent bogey track for Dixon, and a place that for whatever reason always seems to bite him.

Asking RLL’s Oriol Servia to pull a repeat of his 2007 heroics in his first race of the new season, when he came second that year to Bourdais, might be a bit tougher to pull off this time around. It wouldn’t be a shock to see him in podium contention by Sunday, but it might take a session or two to gel with the car and the team this week.

For Andretti Autosport, Marco Andretti’s qualifying has left his Long Beach results lacking more often than not (best finish sixth in 2009 in five starts), while Carlos Munoz seeks an encore of his excellent qualifying at St. Petersburg or something close to his Indy Lights win here last year. You wouldn’t put either of these two in the top tier of Long Beach contenders just yet.

The four that fall into the “can they punch above their weight” club are Sebastian Saavedra, Josef Newgarden and rookies Jack Hawksworth, Mikhail Aleshin and Carlos Huertas. All did so at some stage in St. Petersburg and we’ll see if they can follow up this weekend.

You can see the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach Sunday at 4 p.m. ET on NBCSN and NBC Sports Live Extra.

After eating just one chip, NHRA drag racer says: ‘I seriously thought I was going to die’

Alex Laughlin official Instagram page
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Editor’s note: Due to rain, Sunday’s final eliminations of the NHRA Carolina Nationals have been postponed to Monday morning at 10 a.m. ET. In the meantime, check out this rather unusual tale:

Remember the old Lays Potato Chips commercial from back in the 1980s that bragged “No one can eat just one”?

Well, ask NHRA Pro Stock driver Alex Laughlin and a few members of his team, and they’ll tell you they learned a very valuable lesson that there indeed IS a chip that you can only eat one of.

According to NHRA’s National Dragster, Laughlin and Elite Motorsports crew members Chase Freeman, Kelly Murphy and Brian Cunningham took part Friday night in the Paqui One Chip Challenge.

If you haven’t heard of the Challenge, Paqui Chips has produced a tortilla chip that the company boldly claims is the hottest chip ever made anywhere in the world. The secret is the “Carolina Reaper” pepper, considered the hottest chili pepper in the world, with a rating of 1.9 million Scoville units, according to PuckerButt Pepper Company.

How hot is 1.9 million Scoville units? Let’s put it this way: the Devil might even have a hard time taking this kind of heat. By comparison, a Jalapeno pepper only reaches 10,000 units on the Scoville rating. 

So while they were enjoying some downtime Friday night after the first two rounds of qualifying for the NHRA Carolina Nationals at zMAX Dragway in Concord, North Carolina (suburban Charlotte), Laughlin and Co. paid $30 for one chip – you read that right, $30 for one chip, it’s THAT hot – and thought they could take the heat.

They thought wrong.

“This is the hottest chip in the world,” Laughlin said on an Instagram post that documented the entire experience, adding a warning, “What to expect: Mouth on fire, short-term loss of speech, impaired vision from tears, extreme profanity — or death.”

View this post on Instagram

Never. Ever. Again.

A post shared by Alex Laughlin (@alexlaughlin40) on

 

Laughlin’s post also includes several reader comments that Laughlin and his crew should have had milk on hand instead of water to try and cool things down because milk has a natural antidote to cool your mouth down after eating hot food.

Sunday morning, with his mouth and throat still a bit sore, Laughlin recalled the red-hot episode to National Dragster’s Kevin McKenna:

Never again. Never. Ever. Ever,” Laughlin told McKenna. “It was definitely not the smartest thing I’ve ever done.

One of our guys showed me a You Tube video and it looked like it wasn’t going to be too bad. I like spicy food and it’s usually never a problem. I’ve been to those places with hot wings where you have to sign a waiver before you eat them and that’s never been a problem.

But this? This is on a whole different level. I thought it might last ten minutes. Fourteen hours later, I was still in bad shape. I woke up at 3 a.m. and Googled “internal bleeding.” I seriously thought I was going to die. We all did.”

So if the heat from the chip was off the hotness Richter scale, where did the stunt rank on Laughlin’s own personal Richter scale?

I’ve done some dumb things, but this is right up there.

Well, I really didn’t think it would be that bad,” Laughlin told McKenna with a shrug. “I mean, it’s just one tortilla chip. Like I said, I can usually eat stuff that other people won’t eat, but I had no idea what I was in for.

“I’ve done some dumb things, but this is right up there.”

If you’re up for another challenge in the future that involves eating hot food, Alex, here’s a suggestion: Even though it’s a few years old now, maybe you should try the Ice Bucket Challenge (but fill it with milk) to cool down quick. Just a thought.

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