FIA grants Gene Haas Formula 1 entry

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The FIA has granted Gene Haas’ proposed Formula 1 team an entry into the sport for 2015.

Following the governing body’s decision to open up a tender for a 12th team to join the grid, Haas made his intentions clear to try and enter an American team for 2015.

After meeting with the FIA earlier this year and going through a careful selection process, the co-owner of the Stewart-Haas NASCAR team has received the green light for his project to go ahead.

F1 supremo Bernie Ecclestone had said that he expected Haas’ project to be approved, fighting off competition from rival proposals from Colin Kolles and Zoran Stefanovic. However, it was not until today that formal confirmation has been given by the FIA.

“The FIA has launched a selection procedure for an additional F1 team(s), and applications of a high standard have been received. In close consultation with the CRH, the FIA has accepted the candidature of Haas Formula LLC and are in the process of conducting further investigations for Forza Rossa”, a statement from the FIA read.

“We’re extremely pleased to have been granted a Formula 1 licence by the FIA,” Haas said following the news.

“It’s an exciting time for me, Haas Automation and anyone who wanted to see an American team return to Formula 1.

“Now, the really hard work begins. It’s a challenge we embrace as we work to put cars on the grid. I want to thank the FIA for this opportunity and the diligence everyone put forth to see our licence application come to fruition.”

Ecclestone did suggest earlier this week that there could be a 13th team on the grid, suggesting that Colin Kolles Romanian-backed project could still go ahead relying everything is in place.

The last time an American Formula 1 team was proposed saw US F1 fail to make the grid despite a great deal of fanfare and planning. However, the difference this time around is that Haas has a successful racing team and automation business in place already.

Haas is thought to be looking to use a Dallara built chassis and Ferrari engines, with a European base being located in Italy not too far from the prancing horse’s home in Maranello to work in tandem with operations in the United States.

From what he has said though, it is clear that Haas is aware of the steep challenge that awaits him and his team. Many Formula 1 teams have secured a place on the grid only to never actually make it work, but often they have been privateer projects without enough backing or a racing team in place.

It is likely that there will also be a push for an American driver to become involved in the team. Caterham reserve Alexander Rossi is currently the only US driver to hold an FIA superlicense to race in Formula, but fellow GP2 racer Conor Daly is also a bright prospect that could be an option for the team. Should either driver line up on the grid, they would become the first American to race in Formula 1 since Scott Speed in 2007.

Should the team fail to get ready in time to make the grid in 2015, it is likely that the FIA would be willing to hold the spot until 2016 to give Haas and co. more of a chance to prepare.

The arrival of Haas’ team may not bump the number of teams up to 12 should an existing team leave the sport. Caterham owner Tony Fernandes has suggested that without an upturn in fortunes for his team, he would consider walking away from the sport, whilst Marussia has recently changed hands following the collapse of the motor company.

There is also still a push for a second race in the United States to complement the grand prix at the Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas. The proposed “Grand Prix of America” in New Jersey has been postponed twice, but still has a place on the calendar for 2015. Ecclestone is also keen on taking Formula 1 back to Long Beach after 30 years away.

With the possibility of there being two races, an American team and an American driver, the future is very bright for Formula 1 in the United States.

Column: Contrasting Michael Schumacher’s and Robert Wickens’ situations

(Photo: Tony Gentile / Reuters)
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As much of the world looks forward to Christmas and New Years Day in the next few weeks, a dark anniversary is also on the near horizon.

It’s hard to believe that December 29 will mark five years since seven-time Formula One champion Michael Schumacher was critically injured in a skiing accident, suffering a traumatic brain injury.

Schumacher and his family were on holiday in the French Alps when he fell and struck his head on a boulder. The impact was so severe that it cracked the helmet he was wearing straight through.

One can only imagine the damage the impact did to Schumacher’s skull and brain.

While chronologically the accident occurred a half-decade ago, for many of “Schu’s” most ardent fans, it seems like it was just yesterday when the earth-shattering news broke.

In the following days and weeks after his accident, Schumacher was placed in a medically induced coma, as well as had at least two surgeries on his brain.

Since then the world has waited for news about the racing legend’s condition, only to receive very little in terms of updates over the subsequent five years.

That’s the way his family wants it, having repeatedly requested privacy when it comes to details about Michael’s condition. That request for privacy should be respected.

Schumacher’s wife, Corrina, issued a rare statement late last month that didn’t really say much about her husband’s condition or recovery, but she did thank fans and well-wishers for their continued prayers and concern about her husband, adding, “We all know Michael is a fighter and will not give up.”

In the meantime, Schumacher’s fans have been able to stay somewhat close to his legacy by watching as his 19-year-old son, Mick, has showed significant achievement in his own budding racing career.

So much so that rumors have already popped up that the younger Schu may soon follow in his father’s F1 footsteps, perhaps as early as 2020.

That, of course, remains to be seen.

What makes the Schumacher situation so difficult for many to still understand is how, while enjoying a simple skiing excursion with his family, he suffered a life-changing accident while having survived some wicked crashes during his racing career that barely affected him.

We still don’t know if Schumacher can walk, talk, is conscious and lucid or not – and many of his fans have already accepted that we may never, ever know any of those details. But if that’s the way he and/or his family want it, again, then we need to respect their wishes.

At the same time, there’s another race car driver who suffered a horrendous injury at Pocono Raceway this past August, namely IndyCar driver Robert Wickens.

Wickens suffered a devastating spinal cord injury that has left him a paraplegic – although there remains a great deal of hope that he will one day walk again.

While both suffered serious injuries, there’s a significant contrast between Schumacher and Wickens. The former (or his family) is keeping all details about his condition private, while the latter keeps his fans and supporters regularly updated on social media on how he’s doing.

That includes Wickens posting a number of videos, including some rather humorous ones where he has a mischievous look in his eyes or a good-natured smirk on his face — like bringing in a Christmas tree to his rehab facility, or “racing” teammate James Hinchcliffe in wheelchairs in a Days of Thunder homage of sorts.

Watching each new Wickens video or reading his most recent online messages, it’s very clear that expressing himself and reaching out to the world is indeed good therapy and medicine of sorts for the Canadian driver.

He needs those social media posts and videos as much as we need them from him.

And it also helps fans better understand where Wickens is at in his recovery and rehab.

If Schumacher or his family wish to still remain private about his condition, we must respect that. But perhaps they could see the good will and good tidings that Wickens’ videos and posts offer. They’re as good for Wickens’ own well-being as they are for his fans — and they could be equally as good for Schumacher, his family and his fans.

Follow @JerryBonkowski