F1 engine technology could hinder efforts to improve sound

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As the concerns about the new sound of Formula 1 continue to dominate the headlines, some of those involved with the development of the new turbocharged V6 engines have said that there is only so much that they can do to improve their volume.

A number of leading figures in the sport have raised worries about its image now that the definitive screeching sound of the V8 engines has been lost. Although the 2014 power units are certainly quieter than their predecessors, they are by no means silent, and we are also now able to hear cars locking up under braking.

Bernie Ecclestone, FIA president Jean Todt and Ferrari president Luca di Montezemolo met for talks in Bahrain, and agreed that steps should be taken to improve the engine sound. However, speaking in the FIA technical press conference today in China, Renault’s Rob White and Ferrari’s Pat Fry said that this may not be such a cut and dry solution.

“The noise of the current engine is a consequence of the overall layout, the architecture and so forth,” White explained. “I think the scope to fundamentally and profoundly alter the noise of the engines is extremely limited by the type of technology that we have deployed.

“Therefore I think we need to be realistic about the scope of any action that we might take, but of course we’re sensitive to the subject and we’ll certainly participate in any of the studies that might lead to actions being taken.”

Fry revealed that the technical heads of each team were meeting in China to discuss what steps – if any – can be taken.

“You’ve got the turbo there to try and take all the energy that we can out, so it’s always going to be quieter,” he said. “There’s a round of meetings starting today, in fact, that will discuss and try and work out how to improve the situation.”

The great engine debate appears to be a rather subjective matter. As Formula 1 takes the hybrid route, a change in the sound is inevitable. It is hard to find a balance that will please all parties.

Just as the V8s were criticized when they replaced V10s back in 2006, it might just be a case of us all getting used to the new sound.

AJ Foyt Racing promotes Benjamin Pedersen from Indy Lights to IndyCar for 2023 season

Benjamin Pedersen AJ Foyt
AJ Foyt Racing
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Benjamin Pedersen is the first driver to land a promotion from Indy Lights into IndyCar for next season as AJ Foyt Racing confirmed Wednesday he’ll be part of its 2023 lineup.

Pedersen, a 23-year-old dual citizen of Denmark and the United States, spent last season running the full Indy Lights schedule for HMD Motorsports. Linus Lundqvist, his teammate, won the Lights title, and Pedersen finished fifth in the final standings. Pedersen earned his only win earlier this month when he led every lap from the pole at Portland.

Pedersen also ran four races for HMD in 2021 with back-to-back runner-up finishes in his debut. Pedersen landed on AJ Foyt Racing team president Larry Foyt’s radar through a “trusted colleague” and Pedersen spent most of last season shadowing the IndyCar team.

His promotion to IndyCar comes ahead of all four drivers who finished ahead of him in the Indy Lights standings, including champion Lundqvist.

“We are really looking forward to having Benjamin as part of the team,” Larry Foyt said. “His enthusiasm is infectious, and he is 100 percent committed to IndyCar, AJ Foyt Racing, and doing the best he can to win races.

“It’s been great to have him embedded with the team this past season, and everyone is excited to hit the ground running when testing begins. It is also great to have a multi-year program in place, which will help him and the team grow together.”

Foyt did not announce a car number for Pedersen. Kyle Kirkwood spent his rookie season driving AJ Foyt’s flagship No. 14 but Kirkwood is moving to Andretti Autosport. The team has not yet announced if Dalton Kellett will return for a fourth season, and a third car for Tatiana Calderon was pulled from competition after seven races because of sponsorship non-payment. Shutting down Calderon’s team removed the only semi-regular female driver from the IndyCar field.

Pedersen, however, was signed to an agreement Foyt said “spans multiple seasons as the team plans to develop the young rookie and is aligned to a longer-term plan for AJ Foyt Racing.”

Pedersen was born in Copenhagen but raised in Seattle and currently lives in Indianapolis. He said his time shadowing the IndyCar team has given him a jump on his rookie preparations.

“I’ve spent a lot of time this season with AJ Foyt Racing learning the ins and outs of making the jump to IndyCar and it’s been really nice to do that in conjunction with my Indy Lights season,” Pedersen said. “IndyCar has been my target goal since I started open wheel racing in 2016. The racing, atmosphere, fans, events, tracks, etc. are all awesome.”