Swan Racing restructures, splits up two-car Sprint Cup operation

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Swan Racing has restructured its two-car Sprint Cup team, the organization announced Wednesday afternoon.

Minority owner Anthony Marlowe has merged his ownership stake in the No. 26 Toyota driven by Sprint Cup rookie Cole Whitt (photo) with BK Racing, which now expands to a three-car operation. Meanwhile, the No. 30 team has been sold to John Cohen, owner of XxxTreme Motorsports.

Whitt will make his first appearance under the BK banner in Saturday night’s Toyota Owners 400 at Richmond International Raceway.

“I am thrilled about the merger with my new partners at BK Racing,” Marlow said in a Swan media release. “My friend Ron Devine and the BK ownership group really stepped up to enable me to keep the No. 26 on the track.”

Whitt will remain behind the wheel of the entry starting with Saturday’s Toyota Owners 400 at Richmond International Raceway.

As for the No. 30 team, Sprint Cup rookie Parker Kligerman is out, to be replaced by NASCAR veteran JJ Yeley. Stephen Lane will remain as crew chief, and several of Swan Racing’s crewmembers will also be staying with the team.

XxxTreme has struggled itself this season, having entered but also failed to qualify for four Cup events.

It’s expected that Yeley will be in the No. 30 at Richmond.

Davis was forced to take the actions he has due to expected sponsorship that failed to materialize. In addition to Marlowe, the team had two other minority investors: former NFL star Bill Romanowski and rapper Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson.

“Over the past couple weeks, we worked tirelessly to find an alternative to ending operations,” Davis said in a statement. “Fortunately, we were able to find a home for the No. 26 team and the No. 30 team thanks to Anthony Marlowe and Jonathan Cohen.

“I am very relieved to know that the Nos. 26 and 30 will be in good hands and will continue to compete the remainder of the 2014 season. Most importantly, most of the team members have the opportunity to continue their employment in the sport and to support their families.”

Kligerman remains under contract to Davis and the remnants that remain of Swan Racing. Davis is reportedly looking at ways to get Kligerman into another ride, but nothing has materialized as yet.

“Although it’s unfortunate we are having to scale back, I look forward to the future and the exciting things that I’m confident we will accomplish at Swan Racing or with another team,” Kligerman said in a statement.

Kligerman, 23, has struggled significantly in his first full season in the Cup series. In eight starts, he has four DNFs and a season-best finish of just 29th in the season-opening Daytona 500.

“I value the relationship that I’ve had with Brandon Davis and am very grateful for him giving me an opportunity to compete in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series,” Kligerman said. “Whether I continue to race with Brandon and Swan Racing or end up with another team, I will always give it my all on and off track to be the best I can be.”

Davis added in his statement that other organizations have shown interest in Kligerman.

“We are encouraged by the response we have received from interested parties. Parker continues to be one of the most talented young drivers in NASCAR,” Davis said. “He brought this racing team one of its strongest results in his first race with us, and we are certain of his success in the future.”

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Hunter and Jett Lawrence walk a delicate balance between winning races and favoring the fans

Hunter Jett Lawrence fans
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ANAHEIM, California – Hunter and Jett Lawrence are two of the most popular riders on the Monster Energy Supercross circuit, with fan bases that established and grew immediately when they came to America to ride for HRC Honda. Connecting with those fans came naturally for the charming Australian brothers, but it has not come without cost.

“It’s cool they’re there and it’s one of the things we try to do is give the fan that interaction,” Hunter told NBC Sports during Supercross Media Sessions ahead of the 2023 season. “It’s why we do ride days, meet-and-greets, press conferences  – all that stuff, because it’s exciting for them. We are trying to bridge the gap so they get personal interaction. Because that’s all they’re after. It’s all about getting that fan to think, ‘I know that guy. I didn’t meet him, but I get him. I get his humor.’ ”

There is no artifice in either brother. Their fan appeal is directly attributable to who they are at their core. And it’s that very genuineness that has throngs of fans standing outside their hauler, waiting for just a moment of their time.

“It’s about being yourself – talking to people,” Hunter said. “It’s not like I turn it on or turn it off; it’s just about being yourself. This is who we are, this is who you get and this is how it will be. You can’t portray something you’re not. If you keep saying you’re an orange, but apples keep popping out, it’s only a matter of time [until they figure it out].”

The key word is ‘throngs’, however. One person wanting just a few moments of time is incidental. Dozens are an entirely different matter.

“It’s tough in Supercross because it’s such a long day,” Hunter said. “The recovery side of it’s tough to do everything. We get stuck outside the grid; we can’t be there for like 10 minutes. We’re stuck there for like an hour. It gets overwhelming at times.

“You feel bad because you want to sign everything, but you’re still here for a job. Every race day is like that. We do the best we can, but there are so many people who wait out front. They’re screaming for you. Even when we’re coming off the sessions, they’re already yelling before you put your bike on the stands. You don’t even get time to take you helmet off.”

It can be a double-edged sword. Personality is only one part of the equation. A much bigger part of the brothers’ fan appeal comes because of their success. Hunter finished second in the last two Supercross 250 West title battles and third in the past two Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championships.

Jett won the last three titles he competed for, including last year’s 250 East Supercross Championship and the last two Motocross contests.

“I think they expect me to have nothing else to do on a Saturday and that I have unlimited energy,” Jett said. “But, I’m trying to recover for the next race.”

It’s a matter of timing. Jett has gained a reputation last year for handing out hundreds of donuts before the races during Red Bull fan appreciation sessions. And after the race, once the business at hand has been settled, Jett is equally available to the fans.

“After the race it’s fine; I’ll stay behind.” Jett said. “My job is done on the racing side of things, but until that last moto is done, my main thing is dirt bikes. The fans come along with it. The fans are part of the job, but main job at hand is the racing side of things. After the race, I’ll stay there for an hour or so. It’s a lot calmer.”