IndyCar: Hunter-Reay captures his second straight Barber race (VIDEO)

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Ryan Hunter-Reay erased a frustrating Long Beach weekend with an authoritative drive in the third round of the 2014 Verizon IndyCar Series season, as he repeated his 2013 win at Barber Motorsports Park.

But there were differences. This one didn’t require a late pass for the win, came from third on the grid rather than pole, and featured a Honda rather than a Chevrolet powering his DHL Andretti Autosport entry.

It also ended under yellow following an accident for Russian rookie Mikhail Aleshin in the Schmidt Peterson Motorsports SMP Racing Honda, as he ran wide at Turn 14 and hit the tire barriers hard with just more than six minutes to go.

Hunter-Reay cycled back to the lead following the second round of pit stops, a green flag round after four cautions for 12 laps flew during the first 55 laps. He led 40 of 69 laps.

“I had such a blast, it was a bummer we ended under yellow, what a dream to win with a Honda at a Honda-sponsored race,” Hunter-Reay said to NBCSN’s Kevin Lee in victory lane. “Last week it should have been a great result. Firestones to the wets, blacks and reds, they did a great job. The race kind of dragged on at the end, but it was tough for everybody today. (Switching to slicks) was horrible for everybody – it was like ice skating with sneakers on.”

The win makes RHR the third different winner in as many races to open the season. Marco Andretti in second made it an Andretti Autosport 1-2, the team’s first since Iowa last season.

“I’m really proud of this whole team – Marco drove his whole way to the front. Feels good after Long Beach,” team principal Michael Andretti told NBCSN’s Jon Beekhuis. “The race came to us. It was a good day.”

Added Marco Andretti to NBCSN’s Kelli Stavast, “It was an awesome job by Andretti Autosport. We didn’t have much for the DHL car, but it was a heck of a team effort.”

Scott Dixon in third took his first podium finish of the season. Long Beach sparring partners Simon Pagenaud and Will Power rounded out the top five, continuing their streak of ending in the top five in all three races this season. Power’s off in the early stages of the race cost him a likely win.

Justin Wilson, James Hinchcliffe, Josef Newgarden, Tony Kanaan and Charlie Kimball rounded out the top 10.

Power leads Hunter-Reay, 125 to 107, in the points standings unofficially. Pagenaud is third, 33 back.

Morris Nunn, former IndyCar and F1 engineer, team owner dies at 79

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Morris Nunn, a former Formula 1 team owner and a prominent fixture in the American Open Wheel Racing scene through the 1990s and the early 2000s, died at 79 on Wednesday after a long battle with Parkinson’s disease, according to the Indianapolis Star.

Nunn’s career in racing spans both sides of the Atlantic. He started in the 1960s as a driver before shifting his attention toward the mechanical side of the sport. He then founded a Formula 1 effort, dubbed Ensign Racing, which competed in over 100 F1 races between 1973 and 1982 – the team had a best result of fourth.

However, Nunn may be best known in the U.S. for his exploits in American Open Wheel Racing. He crossed the pond after closing the Ensign outfit in 1982, and was a part of the Patrick Racing team that won the 1989 Indianapolis 500 with Emerson Fittipaldi.

He moved to Chip Ganassi Racing in the 1990s, where he perhaps achieved the bulk of his success. He worked with Alex Zanardi as both his crew chief and engineer during Zanardi’s tenure from 1996 to 1998, and the combination saw Zanardi take Rookie of the Year Honors in ’96, followed by a pair of championships in ’97 and ’98 in the old CART series.

31 May 1997: Alex Zanardi (left) of Italy talks to Mo Nunn , engineer for the Target Ganassi Racing Team, at The Milwaukee Mile in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Nunn also won the 1999 championship with then CART rookie Juan Pablo Montoya.

In 2000, he formed his own team, Mo Nunn Racing, with driver Tony Kanaan – Bryan Herta also contested a trio of events for Nunn that year after Kanaan suffered an injury – and the outfit grew to two cars in 2001, with Zanardi competing alongside Kanaan.

Nunn also ventured into the series that is now called the Verizon IndyCar Series in 2002, fielding an entry for Felipe Giaffone. They went on to win one race that year (Kentucky Speedway) and Nunn’s outfit won another in 2003, with Alex Barron at Michigan International Speedway.

Nunn was a popular and highly regarded figure in the paddock, and a number of people in the racing world took to social media to offer condolences and tributes.

IndyCar on NBC’s Robin Miller offered this detailed look at Nunn’s life in the sport on RACER.com, covering the origins of his career and the impact he had on such drivers as Zanardi and Montoya.

Nunn was 79 years of age at the time of his passing.

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