IndyCar: Servia and RLL nearly win GP of Indy, stake case for more races

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As I wrote pre-season, some Oriol Servia is better than no Oriol Servia, and that some Oriol Servia damn near pulled off the upset in the Grand Prix of Indianapolis in the No. 16 Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing Honda.

As the second half of the Verizon IndyCar Series’ fourth round of the season commenced, the race finally got into a rhythm after a spate of yellow flags interrupted the middle of the race.

Servia, who had last pitted on the same lap as eventual winner Simon Pagenaud and runner-up Ryan Hunter-Reay (Lap 53 of 82), did not have the full fuel mileage available to make the finish despite leading for seven laps from Laps 71 to 77.

It was a toss-up for the RLL team, which is only committed to four races with Servia (this was the third of four planned this season), as to whether to pit the Catalan for a splash or attempt to stay out, go for it and hope for a yellow that would have left him P1.

But the stop relegated him to 12th, which wasn’t representative of how well he ran after coming from 22nd on the grid.

“We were not super quick but at the end we knew that we either had to save a lot of fuel like some of the guys which meant we couldn’t attack and finish seventh or eighth or try to win,” he said. “If there was just one more yellow, we could easily get to the end. We only needed one yellow. It was a chance to win and when we were leading, that’s all we needed was one yellow but it didn’t happen but it was defi­nitely fun. From starting where we started, I think we came back really strong. We’re ready to attack the month of May very aggressively.”

Adding to the frustration for the RLL squad was the fact Graham Rahal turned in by far his best race of the season in the No. 15 National Guard Honda, running with the potential of a top-five finish before contact with Juan Pablo Montoya took him out following a restart on Lap 52.

“I got punted. Montoya was a lap down. He almost hit me actu­ally on the restart before. He tried to dive-bombed me into Turn 7. He was a lap down and I don’t know what he was trying to do playing with the leaders but he just ruined our day,” he said.

Servia only has the rest of the month of May scheduled, but the team is working hard on pursuing additional sponsorship opportunities to add to that.

As one of the series’ – and paddock’s – most popular drivers, it would be a welcome continuation for the rest of 2014.

How IndyCar rookie Sting Ray Robb got that name (and some more of his backstory)

IndyCar Sting Ray Robb
Chris Owens/Penske Entertainment
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PALM SPRINGS, Calif. – Every NTT IndyCar Series season brings a new round of getting to know the rookies, and it’s fairly obvious where the story starts with Sting Ray Robb.

Just for clarification, “Robb” is the last name. His given name indeed is “String Ray” on the birth certificate.

Why, yes, he does come from performance-car parentage.

And yes, the IndyCar rookie named “Sting Ray” will be driving the No. 51 Dallara-Honda for Dale Coyne Racing with Rick Ware.

How did that go over with a mom and dad who clearly prefer American automotive brands?

“That’s a tricky question,” Robb said with a laugh Tuesday during the IndyCar Preseason Content Days. “Yeah, my parents are big Corvette fans, and I think that they ruled out criticizing me too badly because they know the dream is IndyCar.”

“I’ll be in a Honda car and I’m assuming it’ll go pretty quick, so I’m OK with all of that.”

“They’re not going to rename you ‘NSX’ or something?” asked Motorsport.com’s David Malsher-Lopez (whose bitingly sardonic wit is regularly heard in IndyCar media centers).

“No. I hope not,” Robb said. “My name is my name. I don’t need a rename, thank you.”

Robb, 21, has been making a name for himself lately, finishing second in last year’s Indy NXT standings with 11 top-five finishes, eight podiums and two pole positions.

But the Payette, Idaho, native also has an intriguing backstory beyond his successful four years in the Road to Indy ladder system (that also included the 2020 Indy Pro title).

He hails from the same small town (northwest of Boise on the Oregon border) that produced Minnesota Twins slugger and Hall of Famer Harmon Killebrew.

Robb, whose graduating class was less than 100, recently found that Wikipedia listed him and Killebrew as the “notable alumni” from Payette High School.

“It’s nice to be see and appreciate all the things that I’ve learned and been through,” said Robb, who also played some baseball in his day, adding that “I’m more of a consistent singles hitter, slap hitter if you want to call it. No home runs, just doubles or triples here and there.”

Some other facts on the newest memorable name of IndyCar:

–He’s managed by Pieter Rossi (father of Alexander Rossi, the 2016 Indy 500 winner), but he also gets a lot of help from his mother, Kimmie.

“We call her my ‘momager’ because she’s my mom and my manager,” Robb said. “She has been a huge role in my career because she does things that I’m unable to do as a driver.

“She’s able to play hardball with the contracts, etc., and have my best interest in mind when it comes to negotiating, along with Pieter. He may be someone that has a lot of experience in the series with Alexander, but he may not know what’s best for me. It’s good to have them both on my side, and I can learn a lot from them.”

–His family have been lifelong supporters since go-karting. “It was my mom, my dad, my grandparents on the road every weekend,” he said. “My dad has missed one race in my entire life, and it was because he was in the hospital. So we let him have a pass, and he was still on the phone every 30 minutes making sure that tire pressure was right, engine temp was right, we had the right gear on the car, etc.”

–Robb graduated high school a year early to focus on racing after being home-schooled as a child. “I went to someone’s house actually, and she taught me from the time I was in pre-K through sixth grade,” Robb said. “So in seventh grade I started going to public school, and I hate to say it, but I feel like I stopped learning after that point. But it was OK. I got some social skills, lucky for you guys.”

–He also has a wild story about how he landed his current ride during a random encounter in a trip to the gym (which you can read about here).