It took a while, but the Spanish Grand Prix came alive late on

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When Bernie Ecclestone and Luca di Montezemolo arrived in Bahrain last month, their proclamation of “taxi cab racing” was immediately written off as the drivers served up a thriller under the lights.

However, at the halfway stage of yesterday’s Spanish Grand Prix, their argument appeared to have some truth. Lewis Hamilton held an easy lead over teammate Nico Rosberg, and there was little going on further back.

In the final third of the race, though, it came alive. Not only did Rosberg threaten to rain on Hamilton’s parade and snatch the win away, but the split in strategies meant that the likes of Valtteri Bottas, Sebastian Vettel, Fernando Alonso, Kimi Raikkonen and Romain Grosjean all went into battle. Who says that you can’t overtake in Barcelona?

Let’s start with the battle at the front. Mercedes’ decision to split their drivers’ strategies ensured that it was a fair fight. Theoretically, Hamilton had the advantage in the middle stint on the option tire, and Rosberg had an equivalent improvement in pace when he made the switch. However, Rosberg’s middle stint on the prime compound was simply superb.

The two sides of the Mercedes garage were setting targets for their respective drivers. The gap after both drivers had stopped for the first time stood at around four seconds, and over the following 20 laps, Peter Bonnington – Hamilton’s engineer – wanted that advantage to double. On the other side of the garage, Tony Ross informed Nico Rosberg that he was to cut the gap to two seconds, largely matching the pace of Hamilton on the option tire. Frankly, Hamilton didn’t deliver during this period, and instead saved a lot of fuel that he ultimately didn’t use. Maybe he was right when he said that Rosberg had the edge?

So in the final stint, Rosberg managed to use low fuel and the quicker tire to carve into his teammate’s lead, but ultimately fell six-tenths of a second short. The German driver said that he needed one more lap, and again, he is probably right. He never actually was close enough to make a move on Hamilton. It was a tantalizing battle at the front, and although it was a big psychological victory for Lewis, Nico certainly proved that he was no push-over.

Further back, the split in strategy that Pirelli had predicted – two or three stops – made things very interesting in the closing stages of the race. Romain Grosjean ran well to score Lotus’ first points of the season in eighth place, but he just wasn’t quick enough to finish any higher. Williams’ race was lost in the later stages, with Felipe Massa’s decision to run a low downforce setup costing him dearly. Valtteri Bottas finished a solid fifth, but again the decision to pit him late at the first round of stops cost him a shot at the podium, and ultimately Sebastian Vettel also found a way past.

The Vettel-Alonso-Raikkonen battle was a particularly interesting one. Ferrari made the mistake of pitting Raikkonen too late for his second stop, and this meant that both Alonso and Vettel could find a way past. The raw pace of the Red Bull allowed Vettel to come out ahead of Alonso when the Spaniard pitted for a final time, but the real masterstroke with his strategy came with the early first stop. By running in clear air, he was able to easily pass the likes of Hulkenberg and Button who would have otherwise compromised his pace.

All in all, it was a ‘good’ race, with ‘good’ being the perfect adjective. It was by no means Bahrain, but the mix of strategy that Formula 1 has craved for so long was on display for us all to see.

Let us hope that we see more of the same in Monaco, given that overtaking is nigh on impossible around the streets of the principality.

Miguel Oliveira wins MotoGP Thai Grand Prix, Bagnaia closes to two points in championship

MotoGP Thai Grand Prix
Mirco Lazzari / Getty Images
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Miguel Oliveira mastered mixed conditions on the Chang International Circuit in Buriram, Thailand to win the MotoGP Thai Grand Prix. Oliveira showed the adaptability as he navigated a race that began in wet conditions and turned dry over the course of the race. Oliveira won the Indonesian GP in similar conditions.

“It was a long race, but I can’t complain,” Oliveira said on CNBC. “Every time we get to ride in the wet, I’m always super-fast. When it started raining, I had flashbacks of Indonesia. I tried to keep my feet on the ground, make a good start and not make mistakes and carry the bike to the end.”

All eyes were on the championship, however. Francesco Bagnaia got a great start to slot into second in Turn 1.

Meanwhile Fabio Quartararo had a disastrous first lap. He lost five positions in the first couple of turns and then rode over the rumble strips and fell back to 17th. At the end of the first lap, Bagnaia had the points’ lead by two. A win would have added to the gain and for a moment, it appeared Bagnaia might assume the lead.

Early leader Marco Bezzecchi was penalized for exceeding track limits, but before that happened, Jack Miller got around Bagnaia and pushed him back to third. Oliveira was not far behind.

After throwing away ninth-place and seven points on the last lap of the Japanese GP last week, Bagnaia did not allow the competition to press him into a mistake. He fell back as far as fourth before retaking the final position on the podium.

“It’s like a win for me, this podium,” Bagnaia. “My first podium in the wet and then there was a mix of conditions, so I’m very happy. I want to thank Jack Miller. Before the race, he gave me a motivational chat.”

Miller led the first half of the Thai Grand Prix before giving up the top spot to Oliveira and then held on to finish second. Coupled with his Japanese GP win, Miller is now fully in the MotoGP championship battle with a 40-point deficit, but he will need a string of results like Bagnaia has put together in recent weeks – and he needs Bagnaia to lose momentum.

Miller’s home Grand Prix in Australia is next up on the calendar in two weeks.

Bagnaia entered the race 18 points behind Quartararo after he failed to score any in Japan. The balance of power has rapidly shifted, however, with Quartararo now failing to earn points in two of the last three rounds. Bagnaia won four consecutive races and finished second in the five races leading up to Japan. His third-place finish in Thailand is now his sixth MotoGP podium in the last seven rounds.

Aleix Espargaro entered the race third in the standings with a 25-point deficit to Quartararo, but was able to close the gap by only five after getting hit with a long-lap penalty for aggressive riding when he pushed Darryn Binder off course during a pass for position. Espargaro finished 11th.

Rain mixed up the Moto2 running order in the MotoGP Thai Grand Prix as well. Starting on a wet track, Somkiat Chantra led the opening lap in his home Grand Prix. He could not hold onto it and crashed one circuit later, but still gave his countrymen a moment of pride by winning the pole.

Half points were awarded as the race went only eight laps before Tony Arbolino crossed under the checkers first with Filip Salac and Aron Canet rounding out the podium.

American Joe Roberts earned another top-10 in eighth with Sean Dylan Kelly finishing just outside the top 10 in 11th.