The stars are out in Monaco, but no-one can out-fame F1

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The Monaco Grand Prix is not only the most famous race on the Formula 1 calendar, but it is also one of the biggest social events in the celebrity world. It’s where the action and excitement of the sport meets the rich and famous for one incredible weekend.

Unsurprisingly, a number of the biggest players in Formula 1 have been present in the principality this weekend. Bernie Ecclestone recovered from a cold that saw his trial in Germany get postponed to mingle with the stars, whilst former team principal Flavio Briatore was also out and about. Many have enjoyed parties held by Force India and Red Bull, and the Amber Lounge fashion show on Friday night was a great success.

Recording artist Justin Bieber has also been in Monaco this weekend for the race. He even snapped one of the most unlikely selfies ever alongside Bernie Ecclestone, but, according to one report, was refused a meeting with Fernando Alonso after the Spaniard said that he was too busy. English pop singer Pixie Lott has been a guest of Caterham, and performed at the fashion show on Friday night.

On Thursday, the annual amfAR charity dinner took place in Cannes, coinciding with the film festival. It is expected that a number of the stars there will come over the Monaco on race day to enjoy the grand prix. Top Gear star Jeremy Clarkson has also made his annual pilgrimage to Monaco, snapping some of the “floating caravans” in the harbor. Never one to shy away from a debate, he also had a very brief say on Nico Rosberg’s ‘mistake’ in Q3, siding with the German.

Film star Benedict Cumberbatch made another appearance in the F1 paddock this weekend, having appeared in Malaysia and even conducted the podium interviews. Quite whether he’ll reprise this role for Monaco remains to be seen, but he is quickly becoming a regular in the paddock. Fellow Star Trek star Sir Patrick Stewart is a guest of Mercedes this weekend, and he is planning to take part in a charity karting race ahead of the British Grand Prix.

A raft of big names will undoubtedly turn up on the grid today, but no matter how famous they are, nothing will detract from the thrilling race that is in store in Monaco.

You can watch the Monaco Grand Prix live on NBC from 7:30am ET. F1 Countdown starts at 7am on NBCSN.

Bourdais hopes last year’s crash turns into Indy 500 Cinderella story on Sunday

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Sebastien Bourdais has relived his May 20, 2017 crash during Indianapolis 500 qualifying over and over in his mind, day after day, week after week and month after month.

He would think of the worst crash of his open-wheel racing career at least once — if not several times — a day, particularly when he’d experience a slight twinge of pain.

“I think about it every day,” Bourdais told MotorSportsTalk. “Even though I’m functionally 100 percent now, it’s still very rare that during the day that there’s not a little pinch or something that reminds me of what happened.”

But this past weekend while qualifying for this year’s 500, one year later, the French driver said he was finally able to work past the mental roadblock that just would not leave his mind.

The solution was simple: complete the task he wasn’t able to do so last year, namely, qualifying for the race – and qualifying well.

Bourdais will start fifth in Sunday’s 102nd Running of the Greatest Spectacle In Racing, in the middle of Row 2.

“(Last year’s crash is) still in my mind,” Bourdais said. “But I think the biggest hurdle, at least mentally, was qualifying last weekend, putting yourself back in the same set of circumstances, going back on the line there.

“It felt a little bit the same, chances of rain, some rain, delays, you get back in line, conditions change, everything gets harder because it gets hotter, but that’s the biggest hurdle to overcome. After that, it’s back to business.”

Bourdais has already won once in 2018 – the season-opening race in his adopted hometown of St. Petersburg, Florida.

It helped jump start him to a strong overall run in the first five races of the season, including a fourth-place showing two weeks ago at the INDYCAR Grand Prix of Indianapolis, coupled with entering the 500 third in the Verizon IndyCar Series standings.

Now, he wants to win the biggest race of his career. If he does so, he’ll feel as if he finally and completely has come full circle from last year’s devastating wreck that shattered his pelvis, going head-on into the Turn 2 wall at a reported 228 mph.

“Well, it’s the Holy Grail of IndyCar, it doesn’t really get any bigger than that,” Bourdais said of the 500. “It’s the biggest achievement that you can accomplish in IndyCar.

“I don’t think I’m any different than anybody else: we all want to win it pretty bad, but I’m sure after what happened after last year, it’d be a Cinderella story.”

But there’s a caveat to Bourdais writing that story: “There’s 32 other drivers that want to accomplish the same thing, and it’s a one day event. We’ll give it our best shot … you can only give your very best and see what happens on that given day.”

Bourdais has a lot going for him heading into Sunday. First off, he’ll start from the highest qualifying position he’s ever had in what will be the seventh Indy 500 of the 39-year-old’s racing career.

Second, his confidence and comfort level are higher than they’ve ever been coming into the annual classic at the 2.5-mile Brickyard oval.

Third, he’s forgiven himself – not IMS – for what happened last year. He has no ill feeling towards the racetrack, nor does he seek revenge. If he were to start thinking that way, it would serve no positive purpose.

“No. I’m not really that way,” he said when asked if he wants revenge over the racetrack. “The track didn’t beat me up, I beat myself.

“The bottom line is there were a couple of reasons why it happened, but I got more comfortable and more confident and confidence and comfort at some point just bite you at Indy.

“You just do your laps, you get into such a rhythm and the week had gone perfectly with an awesome car and there was not a doubt in my mind it was going to stick (going into Turn 2), and that’s when it happened – and I paid the price.”

So, Bourdais is simply going to go out and race, again, hoping to complete what he started last year before being so painfully derailed.

His best finish to date in the 500 has been seventh (2014). He just needs for his Dale Coyne Racing with Vasser – Sullivan Honda to finish six places higher on Sunday.

And if he does, his move to Dale Coyne Racing last year – he’s competed in 13 of 23 races with two wins, 3 podiums and one pole – would only serve to make what already has proven to be a great move into a potentially brilliant move.

Because, yes, Bourdais isn’t just thinking Indy 500 win, he’s also thinking of a potential championship this season.

“I sure hope so,” Bourdais said when asked if his team’s success will continue. “I like to say it’s (the success that the Coyne camp has had since he came there) a little bit of my baby, bringing in Craig (engineer Craig Hampson) and Olivier (race engineer Olivier Boisson) and reinforcing the existing crew.”

Bourdais is no stranger to winning championships. He won four straight combined titles in CART and the Champ Car World Series from 2004 through 2007 (he also won 28 races in that four-year span).

“Obviously, it’s one thing to get into a winning team and basically meet expectations,” Bourdais said. “It’s another thing to try and build something and change the status of the underdog and turn him into a contender week in and week out.

“We got a glimpse of that last year, and this year, we’ve been competitive every weekend so far, and that’s a great feeling. Once you’re able to be competitive on street course, road courses, short ovals and superspeedways, then you can start saying and thinking championship.”

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