Jeff Gordon on back problems: “I wouldn’t say I’m 100%”

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Sprint Cup points leader Jeff Gordon gutted out the Coca-Cola 600 despite dealing with back spasms, and he’s set to do it again this weekend at Dover International Speedway.

Gordon, who won at Kansas earlier this month to secure a place in the Chase Grid, noted that while he’s still feeling residual effects after NASCAR’s longest race, he’ll be good to go for the FedEx 400 benefiting Autism Speaks.

“I wouldn’t say I’m 100%,” said Gordon, who does have a degenerative disc and needed an epidural and a Cortisone shot for treatment last week.

“I’m back closer to normal, which is just always aggravation and some discomfort. I’m still feeling some of the effects of what went on last week, but I felt good in the car. I didn’t have any sharp pains, so that’s good.

“I just had a week of rest and normal activity – lots of ice this week. I was pretty sore on Monday and Tuesday after that long 600, but that’s not totally unusual; but probably just a little bit more than normal because of all that I went through. So, I feel good for this weekend.”

Nonetheless, the four-time Cup champion indicated that the matter was a wake-up call to him – not just regarding his conditioning but about possibly being forced to hang up his helmet.

“I think that it really more pointed toward some things that I have to address throughout a race weekend and how I handle the downtime,” he said. “I’ve been working a lot harder on my training and riding a bike and exercising and the problem with that is that it tightens everything up even more so than normal.

“If I don’t stay loose and ice and do other things that keep me loose when I get to the race weekend, what happened could possible occur again. So, that’s the biggest thing I’m focused on; not thinking or focusing on anything else. I can tell you if that happens many more times, I won’t have a choice [regarding retirement].”

But despite talk of the R-word, Gordon is having none of it. While not annoyed by such chatter, he insists his focus is on remaining as consistent as he has been on the track and contending for a fifth Cup title this fall.

“I think that if anything, [the 600] only built more momentum for our race team to go through what we went through, he said.

“And to go have that kind of a race – to show the team what kind of determination I have as well as kind of show our competitors that it’s going to take a lot to get us down – I think that did more good for us for this season and our chances for a championship than anything else.”

March 28 in Motorsports History: Adrian Fernandez wins Motegi’s first race

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While auto racing is an international sport, oval racing remains uniquely American. 

That almost always has remained the case since the inception of the sport, but in 1998, the citizens of Japan got their first taste of American oval racing.

Having opened the previous year, Twin Ring Motegi was built by Honda in an effort to bring Indy-style racing to the Land of the Rising Sun. 

Adrian Fernandez was the first driver to win at the facility, taking the checkered flag in CART’s inaugural race after shaking off flu earlier that day.

Fernandez held off a hard-charging Al Unser Jr to win by 1.086 seconds. The victory was the second of his career and his first since Toronto in 1996.

Adrian Fernandez celebrates with Al Unser Jr and Gil de Ferran after winning the inaugural race at Motegi. (Photo by Robert Laberge/Getty Images)

The race was also memorable for a violent crash involving Bobby Rahal.

Running third with 15 laps remaining, Rahal’s right front suspension broke in Turn 2, causing his car to hit the outside wall and flip down the backstretch.

Luckily, Rahal walked away from the accident without a scratch.

“The car was on rails through (turns) 1 and 2, and all of a sudden it just got up into the marbles, and it was gone,” Rahal said. “Thank God we’ve got such safe cars.”

The following season, Fernadez went back-to-back and won again at Motegi. The track remained on the CART schedule until 2002.

In 2003, Honda switched their alliance to the Indy Racing Leauge, and Motegi followed suit.

The track continued to host IndyCar racing until 2011 with the final race being held on the facility’s 2.98-mile road course, as the oval sustained damage in the Tōhoku earthquake earlier that year.

Also on this date:

1976: Clay Regazzoni won the United States Grand Prix – West, Formula One’s first race on the Long Beach street circuit. The Grand Prix would become an IndyCar event following the 1983 edition of the race.

1993: Ayrton Senna won his home race, the Grand Prix of Brazil, for the second and final time of his career. The victory was also the 100th in F1 for McLaren.

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