Keselowski: Pocono decision was like “playing a game of blackjack”

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Faced with the prospect of not making it to the finish line thanks to, of all things, a hot dog wrapper on his grille, Brad Keselowski decided to gamble on Sunday at Pocono Raceway.

Keselowski held a narrow lead over Dale Earnhardt Jr. with five laps to go but was also driving a rapidly overheating car. Spotting the lapped car of Danica Patrick, he tried to use the airflow around her car to knock the wrapper off and get his car cooled down.

But Keselowski lost momentum in the process, and that allowed Dale Earnhardt Jr. to take the lead. The Hendrick Motorsports driver would not relinquish it, going on to his second win of 2014.

In the immediate aftermath, Keselowski said he should have kept going. But two days after Pocono, he seemed content with the decision he made.

“I told somebody I felt like I was playing a game of blackjack and I was sitting on 15 and the dealer had a face card,” he said during a teleconference this afternoon.

“If you play by the rules, you should take a card and you should hit, and we did, and we busted. The dealer turns over his card and he was sitting on 15, as well, and so you knew he was going to bust out.

“That’s part of it. That’s the cards we play, and some of racing is always going to be chance, and you have to play it by the odds, and I lost. But that’s just the way it goes.”

From his perspective, what occurred to him at Pocono was simply a move that didn’t pan out.

“I didn’t let Dale go and say, ‘Hey, I’m going to try to cool off my engine,'” he said. “I just didn’t execute the move to try and clean it off, and Dale was close enough to get by me, especially with my engine starting to let go.

“You know, in that sense, I don’t feel like anyone would have done anything different.”

But with Pocono done and dusted, Keselowski is now shifting his focus to racing in his home state of Michigan next weekend.

Considering the overall performance that he and Team Penske teammate Joey Logano have had this season – they have earned three wins between them – he has a reason to be excited about his prospects.

Keselowski has won twice at the Michigan International Speedway in the Nationwide Series, which were emotional experiences for him. But it’s clear that a Cup win at MIS would mean even more.

“I remember that after I won a Nationwide race there, just literally locking myself in the bedroom of my motor home after the race and sitting at the edge of the bed and thinking about how awesome that was and what it meant to me and all those things – and that was a Nationwide race,” he said.

“That wasn’t a Cup race. I can only imagine what it would mean to me at the Cup level. I can tell you it wouldn’t be like any other win.”

Carb Day: Tony Kanaan is fastest in final practice for Sunday’s Indy 500

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Tony Kanaan wants to put legendary driver and team owner A.J. Foyt back into Victory Lane at the Indianapolis 500.

Kanaan took a big step toward achieving that goal in Friday’s final practice for Sunday’s 102nd running of the Greatest Spectacle In Racing.

Kanaan was fastest of the 33-driver field, with a best lap around the 2.5-mile Indianapolis Motor Speedway oval at 227.791 mph, more than 2 mph faster than the second-fastest driver, Kanaan’s former teammate, Scott Dixon (225.684 mph).

Foyt won a record-tying four Indy 500’s as a driver. It’s been nearly 20 years since he also won as a team owner in 1999 with Kenny Brack behind the wheel.

Marco Andretti was third-fastest (225.200 mph), followed by Sebastien Bourdais (224.815), Charlie Kimball (224.712), 2017 Indy 500 winner Takuma Sato (224.083), Will Power (223.942), Danica Patrick (223.653), Spencer Pigot (223.584) and Ed Jones (223.556).

Other notable driver speeds included:

* Pole sitter Ed Carpenter was 14th fastest (223.219 mph).

* Reigning Verizon IndyCar Series champ Josef Newgarden was 15th (223.186 mph).

* Helio Castroneves, hoping to earn a record-tying fourth 500 win, was 17th (222.913 mph).

* Graham Rahal was 21st (222.526).

* Former 500 winner Ryan Hunter-Reay was 26th (221.916 mph), followed by rookie Robert Wickens (221.821 mph), carrying the mantle for Schmidt Peterson Motorsports with James Hinchcliffe having failed to qualify for the race.

* The biggest surprise was 2016 Indy 500 winner Alexander Rossi, who was 32nd fastest (221.374 mph).

We’ll have the full speed grid, as well as full driver quotes, shortly. Please check back soon.

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