Le Mans: Krohn Racing’s logistics for last-minute trip

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Krohn Racing received a late invitation to the 2014 24 Hours of Le Mans race and had a very short window in which to prepare their Ferrari F458 and get all their racing equipment and team members to Le Mans, France in time for the official start of the week’s activities. A 17-day turnaround of all race equipment and personnel was all the Krohn Team had for all logistical movements.

Below are some interesting facts and timeline specifics about the complexities of the logistical effort:

  • Krohn Racing received a call from the ACO on Friday, May 23, 2014, that they were officially invited to participate in the 2014 running of the 24 Hours of Le Mans, June 14-15.
  • First official ACO event that Krohn Racing needed to attend was ACO scrutineering on Monday, June 9 at 3:30 p.m.
  • Three Krohn crew members flew on June 2, via Milan, Italy, to Padova, Italy to the Michelotto shop to assist with the transformation of the Ferrari F458 from IMSA specs to the 2014 Le Mans GTE-Am aerodynamics package and Le Mans race engine installation
  • Over 8,650 kilograms (19,000 lbs) of Ferrari racecar, spare parts, and the Ferrari engine were shipped from Houston, Texas to Le Mans, France, via air, water, and land
  • In the process of shipping parts and the car, the following transportation vehicles were used: a small van, a 40-foot curtain side truck, a car transporter, a 53-foot semi truck, a ferry, a Boeing 777, and a Boeing 747
  • On May 30, the No. 57 Krohn Racing Ferrari’s spare parts were driven from Houston to Chicago, and were then put on a plane to London Heathrow airport on June 1. Once they arrived in London on June 2, the parts were driven and also rode a ferry to get to the Le Mans paddock from June 5-6. This task required seven days, door-to-door, and 12 people.
  • The Krohn Racing Ferrari and engine had to make a stop in Padova, Italy at Michelotto’s shop on their journey from Houston to Le Mans. On May 28, the car traveled from Houston to Luxembourg and then on to Padova on May 31.
  • On May 27 the Ferrari engine was flown from Houston to London Heathrow, and rode in a van through the Chunnel under the English Channel, arriving at Michelotto in Italy on May 29
  • Seven different destinations were involved in Krohn Racing’s journey to the 24 Hours of Le Mans: the Houston George Bush Intercontinental Airport, Chicago O’Hare International Airport, London Heathrow Airport, Luxembourg Findel Airport, Milan Malpensa Airport,Eurotunnel Calais Terminal (Chunnel),  Michelotto shop in Padova, Italy, and finally the Le Mans paddock
  • All said and done, almost 18,000 miles were covered in getting the Krohn Racing Ferrari race car and necessary race parts from the Krohn shop in Houston, Texas to the Le Mans paddock
  • 7.1 tons of freight were sent, which included seven freight boxes, the race car and engine
  • 24 people work for the Krohn Racing team during Le Mans week and air travel had to be arranged for 21 of them, with the furthest origination point being Perth, Australia (over 10,600 miles without layovers). The main Krohn Racing crew arrived in Le Mans on Saturday, June 7
  • All three Krohn drivers arrived into Le Mans on Sunday, June 8. Team owner/driver Tracy W. Krohn arrived directly into Le Mans by private jet from Houston, Texas, USA; Nic Jonsson flew commercial from his home in Atlanta, Georgia USA to Paris and took the TGV train to Le Mans; and Brit Ben Collins drove and went through the Chunnel  from his home in Bristol, England
  • The Ferrari F458 arrived from Michelotto on Sunday, June 8, and finished the preparations. The three drivers and car went to ACO scrutineering on Monday, June 9 at 3:30 p.m.
KROHN RACING LOGISTIC EFFORT – LEMANS 2014
Date Activity
23-May Krohn Racing receives invitation from ACO
27-May Ferrari engine flown from Houston to Michelotto in Italy via Luxembourg
28-May Ferrari race car flown Houston, Texas for Michelotto in Italy via London
29-May Ferrari engine arrive at Michelotto in Padova, Italy
30-May Krohn Racing spare parts and equipment driven to Chicago
31-May Ferrari race car arrives at Michelotto in Padova, Italy
1-Jun Krohn Racing spare parts and equipment put on plane to London Heathrow Airport
Road  journey begins for equipment and spares from London to Le Mans, France
2-Jun Three Krohn Racing crew fly to Milan, Italy and drive to Michelotto shop in Padova
2-6 Jun Crew work with Michelotto on car prep and installation of engine and 2014 aero bodywork
6-8 Jun Krohn Racing crew arrives in Le Mans
8-Jun Krohn Ferrari arrives in Le Mans
All 3 Krohn drivers arrive in Le Mans
9-Jun ACO Scrutineering at 3:30 p.m.
Post-Race:

  • Krohn Racing plans to spend the three days after the 24 Hours of Le Mans race in their Garage no. 3 at the track to work on the Ferrari, preparing it for the next IMSA TUDOR Series race at the 6 Hours of Watkins Glen, June 27-29. The Ferrari race car, crew and all equipment will then depart Le Mans on Thursday, June 19, with the crew returning home and the car and the equipment being sent via London to JFK Airport in New York, from where it will be transported to Watkins Glen.
  • The Krohn transporter will depart Houston, Texas on Monday, June 23 to drive to Watkins Glen, New York. The crew will fly out on Tuesday, June 24 to Watkins Glen.
  • Simultaneously on Tuesday, June 24 Tracy Krohn, Nic Jonsson, Race Engineer Hayden Burvill and Team Manager Gary Holland will converge at Magny Cours in central France for a P2 test.

Oliver Askew: ‘I was starting to lose confidence’ after ‘hardest hit I’ve had’

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Oliver Askew knew something was medically wrong in the days after concussion-like symptoms began from “the hardest hit I’ve ever had” in the Indianapolis 500. He’d been evaluated and cleared to race after the Aug. 23 crash, but he just didn’t feel right.

The IndyCar rookie told The Associated Press on Thursday he has been experiencing dizziness, sleeping difficulties, irritability, headaches and confusion since he crashed in the Aug. 23 race. He continued to race in four more events as he tried to “play through it” until friends and family encouraged him to seek medical treatment.

He since has been diagnosed with a concussion and is working on a recovery plan with the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center’s sports medicine concussion program, the same place NASCAR star Dale Earnhardt Jr. received care after concussions in 2012 and ’16. Askew will not compete in next weekend’s doubleheader on the road course at Indianapolis, and Arrow McLaren SP will put three-time Indy 500 winner Helio Castroneves in the No. 7 Chevrolet.

“This is all I’ve worked for,” the 23-year-old told AP. “I don’t come from money, and I’ve worked my way up and have finally gotten my shot in a good car. And then all of a sudden, the results just weren’t there in a car I knew should be performing. And I just didn’t feel like myself, you know?

“So initially I felt like I needed to stay in the car and continue to improve. And then I didn’t feel like I could do that with my condition and what was going on. I was starting to lose confidence in myself.”

Earnhardt praised Askew for going to Pittsburgh to see Dr. Micky Collins.

“Oliver is in the best hands when it comes to taking care of this problem and getting back on the racetrack. It was very smart of him to get in front of Micky so that he could understand the seriousness of the situation and begin the process of getting well,” Earnhardt said. “You can absolutely heal from this but not without taking the step of getting help. Often that’s the most difficult step.”

Athletes often hide injuries to continue competing, and even Earnhardt admittedly masked concussions during his driving career. Askew didn’t know what was wrong with him but was frightened to get out of the car.

He is a paid driver who brings no sponsorship money to the team (but did bring a $1 million scholarship for winning last year’s Indy Lights championship), and owner Sam Schmidt holds the option on his contract.

As he tried to race on, his performance suffered. Askew had finished third and sixth at Iowa — the previous two races before Indianapolis. After the crash, he was part of a multicar accident the next week at Gateway and has not finished higher than 14th in the four races since Indy.

A year after winning seven Indy Lights races, Askew has fallen from 12th to 18th in the standings and slipped considerably off the pace. He said he struggled in team debriefs, had difficulty giving feedback and has gone through a personality change that was noticeable to those close to Askew.

Spire Sports + Entertainment, which represents Askew and was among those who pushed the driver to see a doctor, noted Arrow McLaren SP did not reveal that Askew was suffering from a concussion in its Thursday announcement he would miss next week’s race.

“Oliver clearly demonstrated his talent until Lap 91 of the Indianapolis 500, and I hope this does not become another case study of why athletes do not tell their teams they are injured,” said agent Jeff Dickerson. “The reason they do that is because more often times than not they are replaced. In motorsports, there is always somebody to replace you, and whether it was Dale Jr. or Oliver Askew, there is always another driver available.

“I hope this is not a barrier to progress for other drivers — especially young drivers afraid of losing their job — to notify their teams they are hurt. I hope the team proves me wrong because the good news is, the kid has had a head injury for the past month and has still run 14th in IndyCar.”

After finally seeking medical treatment, Askew said he was relieved to learn there was something wrong. He said doctors told him the injury has a “100% recovery rate” and he believes he will be able to race in the IndyCar season finale next month at St. Petersburg. He’s been rehabilitating with exercises and tasks that strain the brain such as deliberately going to grocery stores and the airport.

“Honestly, you know, if I had not gone to see medical professionals I would probably stay in the car,” Askew said. “But now after hearing what’s wrong and that it could get worse, God forbid I have another hit, I know I did the right thing. I think I can be an example for young drivers now in stepping up and saying something is wrong, I need to have this checked out.”