At his current pace, Joey Logano on target to make 1,000 starts in Sprint Cup career

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Time sure flies in NASCAR annals.

Can you believe that Saturday night’s Quaker State 400 at Kentucky Speedway will be the 200th career Sprint Cup start for Team Penske driver Joey Logano?

That’s right.

Logano made his Cup debut at the precocious age of 18 in 2008 at his “home track” of New Hampshire Motor Speedway – while also competing full-time on the Nationwide Series.

The following year, Logano was promoted to Sprint Cup with Joe Gibbs Racing and has become one of the more successful and popular young drivers on the circuit.

“It’s hard to believe that it’s been 200 races already,” Logano said in a team media release. “It just doesn’t feel like it’s been that many.

“When you add in the Nationwide Series races (129) and the few Truck (five) starts I’ve had, I’ve started well over 300 races in my NASCAR career.”

Hard as it also may seem to believe, Logano is now in his sixth full season on the Sprint Cup circuit.

At the rate he’s going, let’s do the math and extrapolate things a bit (and this is all based upon no missed races due to injury or otherwise):

* Logano is on pace to make 400 starts before he turns 30

* He would hit 600 starts by the time he’s 35

* Would make 800 starts after he turns 40

* Would make 1,000 career Sprint Cup starts as he closes in on 46 years old (of course, that’s provided Logano intends on still be racing at that age)

And if Logano does reach 1,000 starts, he would overtake Ricky Rudd (906 starts) for second place on the all-time Sprint Cup starts list. NASCAR Hall of Famer Richard Petty holds the record with 1,185 career starts.

“I’ve often answered the question of what I think about my career up to this point, and I will always say the same thing about it: I did start early,” Logano said. “And did I start earlier that I should have? Was I ready? Probably not.

“But it was an opportunity I couldn’t pass up and I would do it all again the same way.”

Although he earned his first career Cup win as a 19-year-old (at his home track of New Hampshire) Logano endured some dark moments during his time at JGR, including failing to qualify for the Chase in any of his four seasons there.

But since switching to Team Penske in 2013, Logano not only won a race that season as well as made the Chase (finished eightht), and thus far this season he has two wins and is locked into this year’s Chase, as well.

“I learned a lot through my struggles early on and that had taught me a lot that I know today,” Logano said. “I don’t think I would be in the position that I am today without those early struggles.”

To date, Logano, who just turned 24 on May 24th, has earned five wins, 33 top-five and 68 top-10 finishes, as well as eight poles, in 199 starts.

To also extrapolate those numbers further, since joining Team Penske, Logano has three wins, 17 top-fives and 27 top-10s.

“I’m just 24 now and I have six years of Sprint Cup Series experience under my belt,” Logano said. “There isn’t a lot of people who can say something like that. It’s been a fun ride, so I’m pretty excited to get a chance to continue it on until 600 or 800 starts.”

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Valiant efforts from Hunter-Reay, Dixon come up just short at Road America

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Ryan Hunter-Reay and Scott Dixon drove about as hard as they possibly could during Sunday’s KOHLER Grand Prix, and they both drove nearly perfect races.

Hunter-Reay took advantage of Will Power’s engine issues on the start to immediately jump into second, and stalked pole sitter and leader Josef Newgarden from there, often staying within only a couple car lengths of his gearbox.

Dixon, meanwhile, had a tougher chore after qualifying a disappointing 12th. Further, he was starting in the same lane as Will Power, and when Power had engine issues when the green flag waved, Dixon was one of several drivers who was swamped in the aftermath.

Scott Dixon had to come from deep in the field on Sunday’s KOHLER Grand Prix. Photo: IndyCar

However, as is his style, he quietly worked his way forward, running sixth after the opening round of pit stops, and then working his way up to third after the second round of stops.

It all meant that, after Lap 30, Newgarden, Hunter-Reay, and Dixon were nose-to-tail at the front, with the latter two in position to challenge for the win.

Yet, neither was able to do so. Hunter-Reay never got close enough to try to pass Newgarden, while Dixon couldn’t do so on either Hunter-Reay or Newgarden. And, neither driver went longer in their final stint – Dixon was actually the first of that group to pit, doing so on Lap 43, with Hunter-Reay and Newgarden pitting together one lap later.

And Newgarden pulled away in the final stint, winning by over three seconds, leaving Hunter-Reay and Dixon to finish second and third.

It was a somewhat bitter pill to swallow, with Hunter-Reay noting that he felt like he had enough to challenge for a win.

“I felt like we had the pace for (Newgarden), especially in the first two stints,” he asserted. “I really felt like it was going to be a really good race between us. Whether it be first, second, third, fourth stint – I didn’t know when it was going to come.”

He added that, if he could do it over again, he would have been more aggressive and tried to pass Newgarden in the opening stint.

“In hindsight, I should have pressured him a bit more in the first stint,” Hunter-Reay lamented. “We were focused on a fuel number at the time. Unfortunately that Penske fuel number comes into play, can’t really go hard.”

Dixon, meanwhile, expressed more disappointment in the result, asserting that qualifying better would have put him in a possibly race-winning position.

“I think had we started a little further up, we could have had a good shot at trying to fight for the win today,” he expressed.

The disappointment for Dixon also stems from the knowledge that his No. 9 PNC Bank Honda had the pace to win, especially longer into a run.

“The car was pretty good on the long stint,” he asserted. “I think for us the saving grace was probably the black tire stint two. We closed a hefty gap there. We were able to save fuel early in the first stint, which enabled us to go a lap longer than everybody, had the overcut for the rest of the race.

“I think speed-wise we were right there. Had a bit of a crack at Hunter-Reay on his out lap on the last stint there, but cooked it too much going into (Turn 14), got a bit loose, lost momentum. That would have been really the only chance of passing him.”

Dixon remains in the championship lead, however, by 45 points, while Hunter-Reay moved up to second, tied with Andretti Autosport teammate Alexander Rossi.

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