Even just as a threat, idea to drop Monza continues Italy’s recent F1 plight

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Yes, the FIA is based in France, and the origins of Formula One date to the first World Championship Grand Prix in England, but Italy has been as much a part of the fabric of Formula One as any other country in its 60-plus year history.

And quite honestly, I’m getting a bit sick of it getting treated like a redheaded stepchild instead of the valued country that has brought so much to F1’s lore.

News this morning that Bernie Ecclestone is planning to drop Monza from the F1 calendar after 2016 – hell, even the thought of him dropping Monza from the calendar – just makes my blood boil.

It’s akin to Bud Selig signing off his tenure as Major League Baseball Commissioner and saying MLB should drop Wrigley Field and/or Fenway Park in pursuit of some podunk new stadium in North Dakota or something. Or Roger Goodell lowering the boom on Lambeau Field and saying the National Football League is relocating the Green Bay Packers to Abu Dhabi, in the name of international expansion.

There’s four tracks that stand out more than any other on the modern-day calendar as historic venues: Monaco, Silverstone, Spa and Monza. Nurburgring, Montreal and Suzuka also are favorites, but they’re not staples going back to the beginning in 1950.

Monza has been the scene of so much fever – something that can’t be measured by dollars or commercial value.

Does Niki Lauda’s incredible comeback after his near-death accident at the Nurburgring in 1976 carry the same lore if it wasn’t on Ferrari’s home soil? Or does it even happen if Monza didn’t provide the perfect return? I doubt it.

Does the 1-2 for Ferrari in the 1988 Italian Grand Prix rank as one of the all-time great victories for the brand since it broke McLaren’s perfect season if it occurs at Estoril or Jerez, for instance? Hardly.

Does Michael Schumacher’s first Monza win for Ferrari in 1996 inspire the passion of the tifosi to think that after nearly 20 years in the doldrums, they actually were on the verge of an incredible run if it happened elsewhere? Again, unlikely.

These are but three iconic moments from this iconic circuit – a temple of speed where the level of fans’ volume matches the level of the cars (this year, they might exceed it for all we know).

The flood of fans onto the circuit post-race is one of the remaining links to a bygone era, and so refreshing to watch.

The loss of Monza – however presumptive – would be yet another blow to Italy’s current standing in modern day Formula One.

We’d basically be down to Ferrari and Scuderia Toro Rosso, and with no disrespect to STR, it’s hard to feel the same passion about them as a brand since they’re essentially the Red Bull junior team that its perennial underdog, Faenza-based predecessor, Minardi, brought about for 20+ years.

We haven’t had an Italian driver on the grid since 2011. Jarno Trulli and Giancarlo Fisichella were both Grand Prix winners, but never able to reach stratospheric heights in the sport.

We’ve lost an entire generation of potential Italian F1 stars – Giorgio Pantano, Luca Filippi and likely Davide Valsecchi, the Lotus reserve passed over last fall – who didn’t have the budget or the timing needed to enter or stay in Formula One. Pantano’s 2004 season with Jordan didn’t accurately reflect his ability level; Filippi and Valsecchi, both GP2 stars, never got the chance.

Now, the mere thought of losing this circuit – one which still stirs the soul whenever the F1 fraternity heads there – just seems like another idea where potential dollars are trumping passion and history.

You can’t put a price tag on that.

Here are the starting times for 2020 NTT IndyCar Series action on NBC and NBCSN

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Another important tidbit for NTT IndyCar Series fans is out as INDYCAR and NBC announced starting times for the 2020 season. The full television schedule is also included.

There are different starting times at four races in 2020 from 2019. Those include the March 15 Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg, the AutoNation INDYCAR Challenge at Circuit of the Americas on April 26, a later starting time for the Saturday night race at Iowa Speedway on July 18 on NBCSN

INDYCAR released the green flag times today for the 2020 NTT IndyCar Series season that features starting time shifts at four races – St. Petersburg, Circuit of The Americas, Iowa and Mid-Ohio – and the anticipated evening return to Richmond Raceway.

Those four returning races represent the only significant green flag start time changes from a year ago in the 17-race 2020 NTT IndyCar Series schedule, beginning with the season-opening Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg scheduled for Sunday, March 15.

The August 16 Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio will be moved to an earlier starting time and will be broadcast on NBC. Previously, the race was scheduled for 4:05 p.m., but has been changed to a 12:45 p.m. Eastern Time green flag.

INDYCAR’s return to Richmond Raceway on Saturday, June 27 will begin at 8:15 p.m. ET. That is the only new event on the schedule.

Detailed broadcast information for the entire season will be announced at a later date.

Here are the notable changes to the starting times on the schedule:

The Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg, which began at 1:40 p.m. ET this past season, will now have a 3:30 p.m. green flag. The race on the downtown streets of St. Petersburg, Fla., will be celebrating its 10thanniversary as the series’ season opener and be televised on NBC Sports Network.

The AutoNation INDYCAR Challenge at Circuit of The Americas on Sunday, April 26, will have a similar shift, moving from a 1:43 p.m. ET green flag this past season to 4:10 p.m. (3:10 p.m. local) in 2020. The permanent road course in Austin, Texas, will play host to the fourth race of the season and be broadcast on NBCSN.

The Iowa 300 at Iowa Speedway, set for Saturday, July 18, on NBCSN, will be better accommodated for an evening race under the lights with the green flag moving from 7:15 p.m. ET to 9 p.m. (8 p.m. local).

“The return of a night race for INDYCAR at Iowa Speedway is exciting news for our race fans, sponsors, and the entire region,” Iowa Speedway President David Hyatt said. “The cars look great under the lights, and the competition should be even more fierce given what should be cooler conditions. Our track provides some of the best racing you’ll see anywhere, which will be good for attendance. This will be a can’t-miss weekend for all race fans.”

The return to a true night race at Iowa was the result of fans requesting it. The race will begin at 8:00 p.m. CT on NBCSN and the Advance Auto Parts INDYCAR Radio Network. And for fans and drivers, it is nostalgic, hearkening back to the first race many of them experienced … a night race on a short track.

The series hasn’t held a race that began after dusk at Iowa Speedway since 2015, and drivers and fans are welcoming it. Not only does it look more vibrant — and create sparks as cars bottom out — it also makes for better racing. Tires grip better when the track is cooler. Fans also avoid sweltering conditions during summer afternoons.

The Honda Indy 200 at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course on Sunday, Aug. 16, will be the only race among the four that moves to an earlier start time. The race, which had a 4:05 p.m. ET start this past season, will shift to a 12:45 p.m. green flag in 2020 and be televised on NBC.

The NTT IndyCar Series heads to Richmond Raceway – the only new addition on the 2020 schedule – for the 11th race of the season on Saturday, June 27. The field will take the green flag at 8:15 ET for the start of the first Indy car race at the .75-mile oval since 2009. The race will be broadcast on NBCSN.