Ten with Townsend: Pocono Debrief

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Following Sunday’s Pocono INDYCAR 500 fueled by Sunoco on NBCSN, won by Juan Pablo Montoya, MotorSportsTalk checks in with NBCSN IndyCar analyst Townsend Bell for the latest installment of “Ten with Townsend.”

Between commentary, his Indianapolis 500 race experience and his regular commitments in the TUDOR United SportsCar Championship, it’s been a busy year for Townsend, and we thank him for his time and insights post-Pocono. For an archive of all “Ten with Townsend” posts, click here.

 

-You’d said earlier this year Juan Pablo Montoya was methodically coming back to form but not there yet. Did you think when he did get back on form it would be at this point in the year, or more toward the end of the year?

It seems like a reasonable point based on his experience and world-class talent.  Now the question is when can he perform like that on a street circuit, short oval, or permanent road course.  He was patient, precise and aggressive at all the right times today.  Wins on the other disciplines are probably not far off.

-How does Will Power keep his head in the game given this series of penalties he’s triggered? Does he have anyone but himself to blame?

He’s fun to watch because he’s so committed to winning every lap, every session, but that is also what seems to trip him up so frequently.  At this point he needs a dramatic re-think in his approach so as to minimize his exposure to penalties.  I think Tim Cindric is an important part of coaching Will out of the hole he’s in. It’s an interesting challenge to harness the greatest talent in the series right now.

If I look at others to take the blame…the more I think about it, it’s really all Paul Tracy’s fault.

-Were you surprised he came after you guys in the booth post-race, or do you think that was just heat of the moment frustration knowing he’d lost the points lead and shot at another win?

Weird but a good laugh at the same time!  I’m only 32nd in points but in his dome.  How cool is that!?

-Did you like Tony Kanaan’s strategy this race of going for it every stint rather than opting to fuel save?

Well he started off going for it, then tried to nurse it but that wasn’t working so he had to go for it again but it was too late. Sometimes those strategies just don’t work out.  I’m sure TK wishes he and his engineers could have a re-do. He had the outright pace to beat anyone at Pocono.

-Did Helio Castroneves’ bounce back this race impress you after his Houston accident? 

Not really.  He’s a contender year in and year out, race in and race out.  Total pro.

-Who do you think has the mental edge between Power and Helio at Team Penske? Do you think JPM is getting to either or both of them? 

Helio is super focused (always) under that bubbly exterior and not nearly as rattled as Will when things go wrong.  JPM is simply having fun with none of the pressure the other 2 are dealing with – he could very well be in the mix at Fontana too!  The other question is…with all 3 of his drivers in the top 4 in points right now…can RP finally see a championship delivered this season?

-The rest of the field: Surprises and disappointments at Pocono. 

My surprise was (rookie Mikhail) Aleshin racing superbly on a track he had never seen…after just 2 short practice sessions.

Disappointments:  I was feeling for (Jack) Hawksworth and (Bryan) Herta after a tough hit in practice.

-Having had the chance to race Indianapolis, but then watch/call Pocono, how differently do you think Pocono played out in terms of the race flow? 

It was more ‘strategic’ than Indy with everyone cruising for the first 150 laps to save fuel.  Watching the final restart though with everyone fanning out (Aleshin was almost in the paddock!) was pretty wild.

-You hadn’t been to Pocono previously. What did you make of the facility, crowd, event atmosphere and race itself? 

I thought the track was super unique (this was my first time there).  The crowd and event atmosphere has plenty of room to grow.

– How did you enjoy calling the race with Bob Varsha and Paul Tracy? How has PT developed in just a few races in the booth this season? 

I really enjoyed it with Bob and PT.   Bob is so polished and effortless with his delivery.  My first U.S. broadcasting job (F1 on SPEED) was under his command so it was nice to work with him again.

PT has more winning expertise than anyone to ever sit in that chair so I try to listen and learn as much as I can.  He also makes me laugh in so many ways he doesn’t realize.  I particularly enjoyed watching him squirm as I learned Pocono with the Z28 in a single flying lap after dealing with his mild culinary freak-out when I ventured into the hood Saturday night in search of good food.

source:
Townsend Bell (center) flanked by Bob Varsha and Paul Tracy.

Attention NASCAR teams: IMSA drivers available for Daytona!

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NASCAR will be making its debut on the Daytona International Speedway road course next month, and there’s a big fan who’d like to join the historic weekend.

This fan actually has impressive credentials, too — a few thousand laps around the 12-turn, 3.56-mile layout that annually plays host to the Rolex 24 at Daytona in January.

In 2014, the winning GTLM team in the sports car endurance classic included IMSA Porsche driver Nick Tandy, who rabidly has followed NASCAR for more than 30 years since growing up in England.

So why not try racing NASCAR? Especially because Tandy has the weekend of Aug. 14-16 free.

He’s not picky, either — offering up his services on Twitter (as well as those of Porsche teammate Earl Bamber) for an ARCA, Xfinity, trucks or Cup ride.

Tandy’s affinity for American stock-car racing runs deep.

His first trip to the World Center of Racing was as a fan attending the 50th running of the Daytona 500 on Feb. 17, 2008. During Rolex testing in January, Tandy, 35, said he hadn’t missed a Cup race on TV in 15 years.

Among his favorite NASCAR drivers: the Earnhardts, Jimmie Johnson and Kyle Busch. When IMSA ran the Indianapolis Motor Speedway road course in 2014, Tandy stayed a few extra days at the Brickyard and bought Kyle Busch gear for himself and his children.

He briefly took the stage during a NASCAR weekend last October. After IMSA’s season finale at Road Atlanta, Tandy made a few demonstration laps and a burnout in his No. 911 Porsche before the Cup race at Talladega Superspeedway.

He also has some experience in stock cars, having raced Modified-type grass-roots series on England’s quarter-mile short tracks.

Couple that with a Daytona road course record that includes two consecutive podium class finishes (including last Saturday) and a sports car resume with 13 IMSA victories and an overall win in the 2015 24 Hours of Le Mans … and maybe a NASCAR team should take a look.

And Tandy isn’t the only IMSA driver who likely would be available.

Corvette driver Jordan Taylor, who won the 2017 Rolex 24 overall title with Jeff Gordon as a teammate (and the inspiration for his Rodney Sandstrom persona), also tweeted his availability for the weekend on the high banks.

Sports car veteran Andy Lally, a GTD driver with multiple class wins in the Rolex 24 as well as 38 Cup starts (he was the 2011 rookie of the season in NASCAR’s premier series), also hung out his shingle.

There also is AIM Vasser Sullivan’s Jack Hawksworth (who just won at Daytona last Saturday), the Englishman who teamed with Kyle Busch at the Rolex 24 in January and made an Xfinity start at Mid-Ohio last year with Joe Gibbs Racing.

Many sports car drivers (such as Taylor) already live in Florida, and many are hunkering down in the Sunshine State with IMSA returning to action at Daytona last week and Sebring International Raceway next week. Because of COVID-19-related travel concerns and restrictions, several IMSA stars who live outside the country are riding out the pandemic within a few hours of Daytona with nothing to do.

Why not a weekend at the World Center of Racing?

Over the years, scads of “road-course ringers” (including some Formula One veterans) have tried their hands in stock cars at Sonoma Raceway and Watkins Glen International.

How about considering the many sports car drivers who already have reached victory lane at Daytona by making a few right-hand turns, too?