IndyCar: Montoya’s surge leads post-Pocono stats of note

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Just as we did post-Houston, here are some intriguing stats gleaned from digging into the numbers post-Sunday’s Pocono INDYCAR 500 fueled by Sunoco for the Verizon IndyCar Series:

  • Pocono winner Juan Pablo Montoya is the eighth different winner in 11 races. Two more makes 10 to tie the 2013 mark, with seven races to go.
  • Montoya has also recorded four top-10 finishes in a row, the longest active streak in the series, as he’s up to fourth in the championship. He and Team Penske teammate Helio Castroneves now have first, second and third-place finishes this year; Will Power is yet to finish third.
  • Here’s another Montoya stat: He’s the top-scoring driver in the championship since Round 6 at Detroit. Montoya has accrued 239 points in the last six races, with Castroneves second (226) and Power third (212) for a Team Penske 1-2-3 run. Simon Pagenaud (fourth, 191) is next up ahead of rookies Carlos Munoz (fifth, 180) and Mikhail Aleshin (sixth, 167). In the last six races, Indianapolis 500 champ Ryan Hunter-Reay has only the 16th most points scored (114).
  • Oval and road/street course championships aren’t awarded as they were for a couple seasons, but it’s still interesting to note who’s excelled at what discipline. Castroneves (222 oval points, 224 road/street course points) has the best points balance across the two disciplines; Power, Pagenaud and Hunter-Reay have been more skewed towards the road/street courses (276, 246 and 227 to rank first, second and third there; they have 170, 156 and 161 points on ovals to rank fourth, sixth and fifth there). Castroneves (222), Montoya (220) and Munoz (186) are the top three points scorers on ovals; fittingly, they’re the only three with top-five finishes in both 500-mile races.
  • Ryan Briscoe became the 20th different driver to record a top-five finish in 2014 with fourth place on Sunday. There were 20 different podium finishers in 2013; thus far, there’s been 16 different drivers in the top three in 11 2014 races.
  • There was not much in the way of points movement on Sunday in terms of position changes. Briscoe gained four positions (13th to ninth), Aleshin three (16th to 13th). Hunter-Reay, Sebastien Bourdais, James Hinchcliffe, Justin Wilson, Takuma Sato and Jack Hawksworth all lost two spots.
  • Podium stats! After scoring seven of the first 15 available podium positions in five races, Andretti Autosport has just two of the last 18 available over six races. Munoz achieved both. Meanwhile Team Penske has gone from five podiums in the first five races to eight in the last six. No other team has more than two podium finishes over the last six races (last six races: Penske 8, Andretti 2, Ganassi 2, Schmidt Peterson 2, Herta 1, Coyne 1, Carpenter 1, Rahal 1).
  • Yes, Pocono offered double points, but Josef Newgarden still made up a bag of points in this one race. With 49 points for eighth place on Sunday, Newgarden scored only three points fewer on Sunday than he had in the previous four races – combined. Finishes of 17th, 11th, 20th and 20th netted him only 52 points in that four-race run from Detroit Race 2 through Houston Race 2.
  • How crucial have the double points races been? Just look at how the results have impacted the championship. The five drivers who have two top-10s at both Indianapolis and Pocono (Montoya, Castroneves, Munoz, Power and Marco Andretti) all sit in the top-10 in points. The drivers without a top-10 on either (Hinchcliffe, Wilson, Sato, Hawksworth, Tony Kanaan, Charlie Kimball, Sebastian Saavedra, Graham Rahal and Carlos Huertas) all sit outside the top-10 in points.
  • Ganassi posted its second double top-five result of the season on Sunday. Through 11 races though, they only have one double top-five qualifying effort, and a single front row start (Kanaan second at St. Petersburg). Team Penske and Andretti Autosport don’t have many either, with each having three double top-five qualifying efforts this season.
  • Pagenaud outqualified Aleshin at Pocono, going back on top after Aleshin’s runner-up grid position at Houston Race 2. Pagenaud leads the head-to-head qualifying vs. his Schmidt Peterson Motorsports teammate 10-1. But with the 11th place in Pocono qualifying, Pagenaud started outside the top 10 for the first time since Round 6 at Detroit Race 1.

What’s next for Danica Patrick after the Indy 500? Dreams, downtime and waffles

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INDIANAPOLIS – When Danica Patrick was a 14-year-old growing up in Roscoe, Illinois, she had a firm idea of what she’d be doing 20 years later.

A reporter from her hometown newspaper recently reminded her of that in a recent interview when he brought a prescient artifact from those teenage years – an essay that she crafted as an up and coming go-kart driver about her racing accomplishments.

“I’m breezing through it, and then at the end, it said, ‘I wanted to race Indy cars,” Patrick, 36, said Thursday at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. “I was 14. I told him, ‘See? If this isn’t an example of “Write that shit down,” nothing is.’

“This is manifesting. You have write it down and you have to imagine what you want. So I do that as much as I can.”

Heading into the final start of her career in Sunday’s Indianapolis 500 (she will start seventh in her No. 13 Dallara-Chevrolet for Ed Carpenter Racing), Patrick already seems to have a solid idea of the next 20 years — in part, because of having some glimpses into her post-racing life.

There has been plenty of downtime since her final NASCAR start in the Daytona 500 three months ago. She has taken vacations (including an India trip to meet the Dalai Lama with boyfriend Aaron Rodgers) and created several new routines on her suddenly free from racing weekends.

“I make waffles on Sundays now,” she said. “That’s pretty fun.  In the summer, there’s like farmers market.  I can’t wait for that.  I mean, there’s going to be probably some new stuff that I don’t know yet.

“The one thing that I am definitely looking forward to less of is less stress.  Last weekend was awesome at the end of it all because it went well with qualifying, but I was nervous for 95% of that weekend. That’s uncomfortable.”

But testing her comfort zone is appealing to Patrick, who has spent most of her adult life testing the boundaries of gender norms in her profession. Though the pressure of race weekends might disappear, her incessant quest for challenges probably will remain.

Now that racing is over, Patrick still has a winery, a clothing line, a cookbook and a fitness manual to promote – and more is on the way.

“I just have a habit for pushing myself to uncomfortable spaces, making them comfortable for me,” she said. “At least just making them comfortable enough to be able to manage.

“As an example, I went bungee jumping a long while back, like 10 years.  I’m super scared of heights.  I’m still scared of heights.  But I just like to know that if I want to do something, I am brave enough and confident enough to do it.  That doesn’t mean I’m not still scared.  That doesn’t mean it’s not still something that’s easy to me afterward. I just like to know I can get past the fear if I have to.

“I’m OK with transitioning into other things, finding a little bit of happiness and joy each day, less colorization of emotions. I’m ready for that.”

So what specifically is on tap? Talk shows? Another book?

Patrick demurs when pressed.

“I think I have definitely big dreams and aspirations for myself, for all my companies, for the kind of emotion I want to have on a day-to-day basis,” she said. “I’m looking forward to a good, easy, happy, calm, joyful, exciting, adventurous life.  If I say I want it, there’s a very good chance that’s what I’ll get.”

In the short-term, there’s hosting an ESPN awards show that will keep her busy through July.

And after that, her schedule will free up just as Green Bay Packers training camp begins for Rodgers, the two-time MVP quarterback.

“I’m thinking I’m going to have plenty of time to write a cookbook in Green Bay,” she said.