Erik Jones channels Kyle Busch, wins Trucks race at Iowa

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Kyle Busch wasn’t at the Camping World Truck Series race at Iowa Speedway Friday night, but one of his drivers Erik Jones, did a great job of channeling his boss in the American Ethanol 200.

The 18-year-old Jones dominated the 200-lap event, leading 131 laps at the 7/8-mile track in Newton, Iowa, for his second career win in the Truck series.

“That was awesome,” Jones told Fox Sports 1. “We definitely drove hard and there was nothing left in that thing.”

There was a close call with about 16 laps left when Jones got stuck behind lapped traffic and bumped fenders with eventual runner-up Ryan Blaney, but both drivers were able to continue on with minimal damage to their trucks.

“Ryan is a great competitor and great to race against,” Jones said. “He just raced me hard, raced me clean, we showed a lot of respect to each other.”

It was the ninth straight win in the Truck series for Toyota and the seventh in the season’s first nine races by Kyle Busch Motorsports drivers.

Ryan Blaney finished second, followed by Matt Crafton, Joey Coulter, German Quiroga Jr., Ben Kennedy, Jeff Choquette, Cole Custer, Tyler Reddick and John Hunter Nemechek.

Finishing 11th through 20th were Spencer Gallagher, Chase Pistone, Darrell Wallace Jr., Jeb Burton, Justin Jennings, Mason Mingus, Tyler Young, Johnny Sauter, Chris Eggleston and Justin Lofton.

The race only had a handful of cautions. Due to the second practice being postponed due to rain earlier in the day, NASCAR scheduled a competition caution at Lap 40.

The race almost got there, before a wreck on Lap 39 brought out the yellow.

Then on Lap 62, Ron Hornaday Jr. inadvertently put Timothy Peters into the outside wall. Peters retaliated by spinning Hornaday a half-lap later, which could lead to post-race penalties by NASCAR officials.

Jones led at the halfway mark (100 laps), leading Blaney, Crafton, Wallace Jr. and Coulter.

As for the NCWTS points standings, Crafton moved back into first place, Blaney moved up to spots into second (two points behind Crafton), previous points leader Sauter fell from first to third, Quiroga climbed from sixth to fourth and Hornaday remained in fifth place.

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Check out KBM’s Vine video of Jones pulling into victory lane at Iowa:

https://vine.co/v/MxbtlZ3W3F6

Robert Wickens in the Indy 500? Bryan Herta making plans to field a car for next year

Robert Wickens Indy 500
Brett Farmer/LAT Images/IMSA
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DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Bryan Herta wants to enter Robert Wickens in the Indy 500 as early as 2024 – a year longer than preferred as work continues on the hand controls needed for the paralyzed driver.

Wickens suffered a spinal cord injury in a crash at Pocono Raceway in his 2018 IndyCar rookie season. He’s worked as a driver coach for the Arrow McLaren IndyCar team since, but last year with Bryan Herta Autosport and Hyundai returned to racing in the IMSA Michelin Pilot Challenge.

The 33-year-old Canadian won a pair of races (including the season opener at Daytona) driving a Hyundai Elantra N-TCR that is fitted for Wickens to race strictly through hand controls. Herta said Thursday that perfecting that technology for an Indy car in the biggest race in the world has slowed the project he’s determined to do with Wickens.

‘I’M AS HUNGRY AS EVER’: Robert Wickens’ return to racing

“I’d love to take Robbie back to Indy because I know he could do that, and I think that would be a next step for him in his journey,” Herta told The Associated Press. “We’ve spent a lot of time looking at the logistical side of things, hand controls, and I think we have solutions for that.”

Herta said Honda has been supportive of the process, which Herta called “one of the most important things we’ve done in racing” last year.

“We actually looked at doing it this year, but the logistics of it, the timing, it just wasn’t enough,” Herta said. “That’s not something you can rush. There’s some things that we have to work very closely with IndyCar on, and things we just have to get right. It’s a process, but I can see a path to it.”

Wickens, when told his boss was openly discussing the Indy 500, grinned widely. Herta as a team owner won the Indianapolis 500 with Dan Wheldon and Alexander Rossi.

“That’d be fun,” he said of running the Indy 500.

But like Herta, Wickens said the effort has to be both done correctly and be competitive.

“We’d like to do it right. If we started right now, can we get a car ready for the open test in April? Probably,” Wickens told The AP. “But I don’t know where the systems would be and I want to get on proper simulators to make sure its correct.

“We all want to do a proper, professional effort,” he added. “I don’t want to do it for a marketing campaign. I want to do it for a chance to win.”

Wickens in 2021 did a demonstration in Canada that marketed advancements for paralyzed drivers and gave him a chance to again drive. His entire life had been upended 14 races into his rookie IndyCar season, just three months after winning top rookie honors at the Indianapolis 500.

Wickens has since married, returned to racing last year and welcomed the birth of his first child, an son named Wesley whom is infatuated with both race cars and the trip to Disney he took this week during the off days at Daytona International Speedway.

Wickens, who uses a wheelchair but can stand with some support, marks a full year back racing on Friday in the season-opening IMSA Michelin Pilot Challenge race. Despite success last season, Herta made changes to his lineups and Wickens this year will be teamed with Harry Gottsacker.